Articles by author: ealdridgelow

  • “A 17th-Century Poet’s Digital Renaissance”  – Free Event

    January 26th, 7 p.m.: Brock Talks

    Leah Knight, Department of English Language & Literature, Brock University

    When a poet named Hester Pulter died in 1678, her verse survived in a single leather-bound manuscript. That book was barely remembered until scholars reopened it in the very last years of the twentieth century and were astounded to read Pulter’s 120 original poems. These remarkable texts respond to the political and scientific revolutions of the seventeenth century as well as the personal tumult of living through those civil and intellectual wars, birthing fifteen children, and burying most of them. Professor Leah Knight will provide an account of harnessing the digital revolution of our own time in order to transform this important addition to our store of early modern women’s writing by making it freely available through The Pulter Project: Poet in the Making.

    This event is co-hosted by the St. Catharines Public Library and will take place online. The event is free, but advance registration is required. To register, visit: https://www.eventbrite.ca/e/brock-talks-a-17th-century-poets-digital-renaissance-tickets-133877783053

  • Christmas Wishes from MARS!

  • The Virtual Brigata – Free Online Lecture Series

    The American Boccaccio Association, founded in 1974, is a non-profit scholarly organization dedicated to the promotion of the study and teaching of Giovanni Boccaccio’s life and works.  They are offering a free online lecture series – The Virtual Brigata.  For more info, click here.

  • 2020 Medievalism Transformed Conference – virtual and free to attend

    Medievalism Transformed is an annual event hosted by Bangor University, School of English Literature that aims to explore the medieval world and its sustained impact on subsequent culture and thought. It brings together postgraduates and early career researchers from across the United Kingdom and worldwide. The theme of this year’s conference is ‘Movement through Arthurian Legend’.

    The conference will be held over two days: 18-19 September 2020. 

    This virtual conference is free to attend and open to all who are interested in all things medieval. The registration link is available here: http://medievalismtransformed.bangor.ac.uk/register.php.en

    The keynote speaker will be Dr Aisling Byrne from the University of Reading. She will be giving a paper entitled “Medieval Arthurian Texts in Motion”.

    Follow on Twitter @BangorMTC2020 and like our Facebook page “Bangor English Medievalism Transformed 2020”.

    Click here for conference poster

    Click here for final conference schedule

  • The Medieval & Early Modern Classroom in the Time of COVID-19

    Some great reading!  The Centre for Medieval and Renaissance Studies has put together some web resources linking the medieval and early modern periods to our modern-day Pandemic.

     

  • Early Modern Bookscapes – featuring Professor Leah Knight

    You’ve heard of landscapes and seascapes, but have you ever head of bookscapes? Today’s researcher investigates the history of reading and attempts to unravel the complex relationship between women and written text in Early Modern Britain. Dr. Leah Knight from the Department of English Language and Literature spoke with us about textual culture and her digital project featuring the unpublished manuscript of 17th century poet Hester Pulter.

    Dr. Knight studies early modern English poetry, prose, and the culture they emerge from. She’s authored two books, Of Books and Botany in Early Modern England and Reading Green in Early Modern England, which were both awarded the annual book prize of the British Society for Literature and Science.
    More recently, Dr. Knight has been investigating the history of reading, examining the evidence of reading materials, habits, and experiences associated with Anne Clifford (1590-1676).

    She has also turned to the long-neglected manuscripts of the poet Hester Pulter (1605-1678) and has launched a digital project with Dr. Wendy Wall of Northwestern University that was selected as the year’s best project in digital scholarship by the Society for the Study of Early Modern Women and Gender in 2018.

    Find a full transcript at https://brocku.ca/humanities/foreword

  • Viking Culture – featuring Professors Andrew McDonald and Angus Somerville

    What image comes to mind when you hear the word Vikings? A violent warrior society, raiding and pillaging? A seafaring people trading and migrating across vast distances of the North Atlantic?

    Vikings have a hold on the popular imagination, but new directions in Norse studies might just challenge our preconceptions of who and what the Vikings were. We spoke with professors Andrew McDonald and Angus Somerville from Brock University’s Centre for Medieval and Renaissance Studies about their research into gender roles in Viking society.

    Dr. Andrew McDonald is a professor with the Centre for Medieval and Renaissance Studies and the Department of History. In July 2019, Professor McDonald launched his book The Sea Kings: The Late Norse Kingdoms of Man and the Isles c. 1066-1275, which went on to be shortlisted for Scotland’s prestigious Saltire Society Literary Awards.

    Dr. Angus Somerville is a retired professor of English. He taught Old Norse, Anglo-Saxon, and Middle English language and literature while at Brock and won two awards for his teaching. Professor Somerville has published on authors Evelyn Waugh, Robert Graves, Martin Seymour-Smith, and Michael Polanyi. He has worked for almost forty years on The Historical Thesaurus of the Oxford English Dictionary (published by Oxford University Press).

    Professors McDonald and Somerville co-authored the book The Vikings and Their Age and have recently released an updated edition of their textbook, A Viking Age Reader, with University of Toronto Press.

    Click here to listen.

  • CALL FOR PAPERS – BANGOR UNIVERSITY’S 16TH ANNUAL MEDIEVALISM TRANSFORMED CONFERENCE

    2020 Call for Papers for Bangor University’s 16th Annual Medievalism Transformed Conference to be held online at Bangor University, North Wales on 18 September 2020. This conference is re-scheduled from the original date due to the COVID-19 pandemic. Please note that only virtual proposals are being accepted for this conference.

    Medievalism Transformed is an annual event hosted by Bangor University, School of English Literature that aims to explore the medieval world and its sustained impact on subsequent culture and thought. It brings together postgraduates and early career researchers from across the United Kingdom and worldwide. The theme of this year’s conference is ‘Movement through Arthurian Legend’. We invite papers relating to movement through Arthurian legend crossing all periods, borders, and historical and literary disciplines including but not limited to:

    ·     Travel, migration, and pilgrimage

    ·     Familial bonding

    ·     Life and death

    ·     Dreams versus reality

    ·     History of Emotions

    ·     Translation between languages and mediums (ekphrasis, illustration, music)

    ·     Movement of ideas through time, place, and space

    ·     Re-readings of the Arthurian legend through time

    We welcome individual proposals for twenty-minute papers (max. 200 words). We also encourage three-person panel proposals (max. 300 words). Submissions should include a title as well as five keywords. Please send all submissions (as PDF attachments) to medievalismtransformed@bangor.ac.uk.

     We welcome applications from graduate students at any university. We also welcome graduate students and others interested in the medieval period who wish to listen but not take part in the conference.

    We are extremely excited to announce that our 2020 keynote speaker will be Dr Aisling Byrne from the University of Reading.

     Proposals due 30 June 2020

     Follow us on Twitter @BangorMTC2020 and like our Facebook page “Bangor English Medievalism Transformed 2020”.

  • From Text to Bronze: Rodin’s Visualization of Dante’s Inferno by Professor Ernesto Virgulti

    The Centre for Reformation and Renaissance Studies proudly presents
    Professor Ernesto Virgulti, Brock University, MLLC
    “From Text to Bronze: Rodin’s Visualization of Dante’s Inferno
    Friday January 31, 2020
    3:30-5:00 p.m.
    Victoria University Common Room, 89 Charles Street West, Victoria College
    For event poster, click here
  • MARS Guest Lecture – “I am Named the Truth-Speaking Advocate of Ladies”: Defending Women in Manuscript and Print