News and events

  • Transgressive Vikings: Gender boundaries in the Viking Age

    The Centre for Medieval and Renaissance Studies Speaker Series presents

    Professor Angus Somerville

    Transgressive Vikings: Gender boundaries in the Viking Age

    October 24, 2019  3-4 p.m. in GLNA164

    Light refreshments served – come try some Scandinavian goodies!

    All welcome

    Click here for event poster

     

  • Call for Papers – 4th Conference of the Canadian Women Artists History Initiative

    CALL FOR PAPERS

    Modernisms, Inside & Out
    The 4th conference of the Canadian Women Artists History Initiative

    http://cwahi.concordia.ca
    Toronto, 15 – 17 October 2020

    A collaboration between Concordia University, the Art Gallery of Ontario, the McMichael Canadian Art Collection & Ryerson University’s Modern Literature and Culture Research Centre.

    The 4th conference of the Canadian Women Artists History Initiative welcomes papers that respond to this question across all forms of material and visual culture. Case studies and broader analyses are welcome, as are new methodologies for studying un(der)explored Canadian women artists inside and outside of Canada. Modern formations cross time, geographies, cultures, and media; we invite your engagement with current debates that help us to better understand this diversity.

    Deadline for submissions: 15 January 2020. Please email a working title, a 150-word abstract and a 2-page cv to cwahi.conference@gmail.com. Graduate students should also forward a letter of support from their supervisor. Selections will be made by 30 March 2020. Any inquiries may be directed to kristina.huneault@concordia.ca

    Click here for CFP

     

     

     

  • Brock prof returns to land of Vikings for book launch

    A tiny island nation tucked away in the middle of the United Kingdom has a special place in Viking history, and History Professor Andrew McDonald hopes to share that story with a wider audience.

    McDonald, whose research focuses on the Viking kingdoms of the Late Norse period, has been visiting the Isle of Man regularly for research and lectures since 2005. He has worked closely with Manx National Heritage — the island’s heritage organization — and consulted on a number of their initiatives, including museum exhibits.

    McDonald returned to the heart of Viking culture to launch his new book The Sea Kings: The Late Norse Kingdoms of Man and the Isles c. 1066-1275.

    Brock History Professor Andrew McDonald, fourth from right, joined a group of Vikings of Man re-enactors for Tynwald Day celebrations during his time on the Isle of Man to launch his new book.

    “It’s a somewhat neglected period because it’s usually considered to fall after the Viking age proper, but there is still considerable Scandinavian influence in the Isle of Man and the Scottish islands in this period,” he says.

    The book represents the first-ever overview of the two dynasties of sea kings that dominated the island kingdoms on the Atlantic margins of Britain between the 11th and 13th centuries.

    In the late 11th century, a warlord named Godred Crovan united the Isle of Man and the Scottish islands into a “sea-girt kingdom” ruled by his descendants for the next 200 years, until 1260, says McDonald.

    With the Isle of Man being the focal point of this kingdom, it was an appropriate place for McDonald to launch his new book. The professor gave a public lecture on July 4, following by the book launch on July 6 at Peel Castle, the base of operations for the sea kings of the Late Norse period.

    McDonald’s events coincided with Tynwald Day, a national Manx holiday. Tynwald is the site of a four-tiered artificial hill used for the open-air assemblies, which were important institutions in the Viking world.

    “Every July 5, the Manx parliament or Tynwald still holds an open-air assembly at the site that mirrors in many ways the medieval protocols,” says McDonald.

    His work on the island’s history has always been welcomed enthusiastically by the Manx people, he says. His lectures have always been well-attended, and he has been interviewed about his work on Manx radio.

    “The Manx nation is, rightly, very proud of its Viking heritage and the continuities that exist with the Viking and Late Norse periods,” says McDonald.

    “I am very grateful for the warm welcome I’ve always received there and for the interest in my work. It’s one of the most gratifying aspects of my research by far.”

    Click here to link to original Brock News article.

  • MARS instructor uses creative ways to engage students

    Have you ever thought about registering for a course in Medieval and Renaissance Studies?  Think it might be boring?  Think again!

    Check out Professor Barootes blog reflecting on MARS 2P95  Reading the Middle Ages: the Heroic and the Chivalric, which he taught in 2019 at Brock and will again in 2020.  The student comments show just how engaged they were.

     

  • Happy Canada Day from all of us in the Centre for Canadian Studies

  • Professor McDonald – In Search of the Sea Kings: Public Lecture at the Manx National Heritage

    In Search of the Sea Kings – A Forgotten Manx Medieval Kingdom.  Dr Andrew McDonald will be discussing his new book ‘The Sea Kings’.

    • Date  July 4, 2019
    • Time Doors open 6.30pm, talk starts at 7pm
    • Location Manx Museum Lecture Theatre, Douglas
    • Price £10

    Professor McDonald’s new book represents the first study of the Late Norse kingdoms of Man and the Isles in the period of the central Middle Ages (c.1066–1275).

    “The Manx and Hebridean sea kings represent something like lost rulers of the medieval British Isles. But in their own day they were figures of considerable stature and importance. One of the most gratifying aspects of my research is attempting to redress the balance and restore them to a well-deserved place in medieval British history.” – Dr. Andrew McDonald

    For more information, click here

  • Learning From Old Books

    Joanna Tibbetts, a fourth-year English student, carefully looks through a 16th century book on herbs and plants in the Brock Archives and Special Collection. Tibbetts was comparing the physical book with an online digitized copy for clues about the book’s past uses and what particular reading practices it fostered. Students in ENGL 4P70 “Reading a Renaissance Woman” have been learning about the author and patron of literature Lady Anne Clifford (1590-1676) from Leah Knight, Associate Professor of English. Examining rare books from Brock’s Archives and Special Collections gives students insight into how early modern readers such as Clifford experienced books and reading.

    ENGL 4P70 “Reading a Renaissance Woman” is a cross listed course with Medieval and Renaissance Studies (MARS 4P70) and will be offered again next year.

  • 94th Annual Meeting of The Medieval Academy of America and UTP

    The 94th Annual Meeting of The Medieval Academy of America

    University Toronto Press is excited to announce that we will be attending The 94th Annual Meeting of The Medieval Academy of America in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, March 7-9.

    We are also delighted to announce that A Short History of the Middle Ages, Fifth Edition, has just won a 2019 TAA Textbook Excellence Award. Congratulations to author Barbara H. Rosenwein.

    We’re bringing this award winner and some of our newest books to Philadelphia – and you’ll want to add one or two to your reading list. Visit us to learn more about our most recent publications and to discuss new projects with our acquisitions editor.

    Some of the books featured include:

    Cultures of the Fragment: Uses of the Iberian Manuscript, 1100-1600 by Heather Bamford

    Preaching Apocrypha in Anglo-Saxon England by Brandon W. Hawk

    Reconsidering Boccaccio: Medieval Contexts and Global Intertexts edited by Olivia Holmes and Dana E. Stewart

    The Writer’s Gift or the Patron’s Pleasure? The Literary Economy in Late Medieval France by Deborah McGrady

    European Magic and Witchcraft: A Reader edited by Martha Rampton

    A Short History of the Middle Ages, fifth edition by Barbara H. Rosenwein (Winner of the TAA Textbook Excellence Award)

     

     

     

  • The Knights Templar and the Grail: Exploring Narratives of Rosslyn Chapel

    The Centre for Medieval and Renaissance Studies Speaker Series presents Dr. Brian deRuiter and The Knights Templar and the Grail: Exploring Narratives of Rosslyn Chapel on March 27, 2019 from 2:30-3:30 p.m. in Goodman School of Business Room 308 (GSB 308).  All welcome and light refreshments served.

    Click here for more info

     

  • Renaissance Stained Glass in the Netherlands

    The Centre for Reformation & Renaissance Studies presents a workshop on Renaissance Stained Glass in the Netherlands on Friday March 29, 2019 from 3:30-5:00 p.m. in the Victoria University Common Room, 89 Charles Street, Toronto.

    For more information click here.