Interdisciplinary Humanities PhD Program

Faculty of Humanities




Interdisciplinary Humanities PhD Program

 

Malisa Kurtz, Current Student
Nomadic Transgressions: Globalization, Postcoloniality and Science Fiction

My research examines the intersection of postcoloniality, globalization, and technoculture in twentieth century science fiction. As a genre rooted in a predominately white male tradition, science fiction’s narratives often exclude women, people of color, and the developing world, raising important questions concerning the genre’s relationship with imperialism and globalization. This research investigates science fiction as a global phenomenon that expresses what Istvan Csicsery-Ronay Jr. calls the “technoscientific empire” that is our new socio-political imaginary. Postcolonial science fiction and an increasing number of texts emerging from the Global South highlight the effects of technological development on geopolitically marginalized groups. The interdisciplinary research I propose here argues science fiction is a mode that crosses traditional academic boundaries as it is actively and critically engaged with the political realities of contemporary globalization. Thus, my research aims to generate insights into scientific advancements and global structures that may perpetuate, or perhaps even challenge, continuing colonial ideologies.

 

Malisa