Brock researchers awarded more than $2 million in funding

The Campaign for a Bold New Brock




Brock researchers awarded more than $2 million in funding


June 4, 2009

Nearly 40 Brock University researchers conducting worldwide research were recently awarded more than $2.25 million in grants through the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council (SSHRC).

These SSHRC-funded social science and humanities research projects, undertaken to advance knowledge and build understanding about individuals, groups and societies, represent a success rate for Brock — in the fall competition — that has more than doubled from previous years.

“We greatly appreciate the support of the federal government in research,” said Liette Vasseur, Vice-President Research at Brock University. “Brock has increasingly taken a greater place in Canadian research over the past few years and these results demonstrate the research excellence housed at Brock.”

The research grants include a wide range of topics, including evaluating the effectiveness of Aboriginal network groups, finding modern relevance in works of fiction and the dramatic arts, investigating water issues or studying the various factors involved in aggressive behaviour.

Geographically speaking, the research ranges from work close to home in various Niagara municipalities and institutions to the remote mountain village of Shimshal, on the northern border of Pakistan.

The following Brock researchers were recently awarded SSHRC grant money:

Chelsea Willness, Organizational Behaviour, Human Resource Management, Entrepreneurship and Ethnics, was awarded a Public Outreach Grant of $31,847 in Management, Business and Finance for her research project entitled “Attracting job applicants: The role of organizational image and corporate social responsibility.”

John McNamara, Child and Youth Studies, was awarded a Research Development Initiative (RDI) grant of $24,316 for “Closing the summer learning gap for vulnerable learners: A pilot study.”

Tim Dun, Communication, Popular Culture and Film, was awarded a Research Development Initiative (RDI) grant of $28,506 for “Family communication at the start of a new generation.”

Gyllian Raby, Dramatic Arts, was awarded a Research/Creation Grant in Fine Arts of $140,277 for “Devising theatre with youth in Niagara high schools.”

Under a program called Special Call Northern Communities: Towards Social and Economic Prosperity, a Strategic Research Grant was awarded to co-investigators Lorenzo Cherubini, principal investigator, and John Hodson and Michael Manley-Casimir, co-investigators, all from the Faculty of Education, along with Kathryn Bennett, a co-investigator from McMaster University. The $202,749 grant is for a project entitled “Analyzing the impact of new educational policy on Aboriginal youth in Northern Ontario schools: An Inter-disciplinary and bi-epistemic approach toward building capacity.”

Under the special call for environmental issues, a Strategic Research Grant of $171,499 was awarded to Mohammed Dore, principal investigator, and Khaleghi Moghadam, co-investigator, both from Economics, for “Modernizing drinking water supply in small and rural communities: sustainability and risk.”

Under the special call for environmental issues, a Strategic Research Grant was awarded to Ryan Plummer, Tourism and Environment, Robert DeLoe, from Waterloo University, and Derek Armitage, from Laurier University, for “First Nations and source waters: understanding vulnerabilities and building capacity for governance” worth $263,496. Under the same call, a grant worth $216,194 was awarded to this trio for “Improving water governance through policy transfer and lesson learning.”

Nancy Cook, Sociology, principal investigator, and David Butz, co-investigator, Geography, as co-investigators, were awarded a Standard Research Grant of $84,200 for “Life in the fast lane: Road construction, accessibility and social change in Shimshal, Pakistan.”

Christine Daigle, Philosophy, was awarded a Standard Research Grant of $42,873 for “Nietzsche as phenomenologist.”

Ann Duffy, and June Corman, from Sociology and the Centre for Labour Studies, as co-investigators at Brock, and joined by a York University researcher, were awarded a Standard Research Grant of $99,567 for “Displaced workers and their communities.”

Thomas Farrell, Applied Linguistics, was awarded a Standard Research Grant of $53,673 for “Professional development through reflective practice.”

Ann Howey, English Language and Literature, was awarded a Standard Research Grant of $29,285 for “Trapped ladies and dead lily maids: The Lady of Shalott/Elaine of Astolat in popular culture.”

Rene Kirkegaard, Economics, was awarded a Standard Research Grant of $30,057 for “Manipulating auctions with many heterogeneous bidders.”

Jane Koustas, Modern Languages, Literatures and Cultures, was awarded a Standard Research Grant of $47,432 for “Robert Lepage in Toronto: Transforming translation/theatre practice.”

Cheryl McCormick, Psychology, was awarded a Standard Research Grant of $90,000 for “Situational factors, personality traits, physiological markers and their relevance to aggressive behaviour.”

Michelle Webber, Sociology, and a co-investigator at the University of Toronto, were awarded a Standard Research Grant of $133,951 for “The New Scholarly Subject: Academic work, subjectivities and accountability governance.”

Julian Kitchen and John Hodson, as co-investigators from the Faculty of Education, were awarded a Standard Research Grant of $30,290 for “Aboriginal teachers in Northern Nishnawbe Nations: Learning and enacting Aboriginal pedagogy.”

Adam Dickinson, English Language and Literature, was awarded a Standard Research Grant of $13,515 for “The Science of Skins: Pataphysics, Biosemiotics and Environmental Poetics.”

Danny Cho, principal investigator, Finance, Operations and Information Systems, and Tomson Ogwang, Economics, were awarded a Standard Research Grant of $31,500 for “A conceptual framework and analysis for developing alternative global purchasing managers’ indices.”

Hemantha Herath, Accounting, was awarded a Standard Research Grant of $27,334 for “A study of Copula functions in real options.”

Mark Julien, principal investigator, and Deborah Zinni, Organizational Behaviour, Human Resource Management, Entrepreneurship and Ethnics, were awarded a Standard Research Grant of $8,104 for “Evaluating the effectiveness of Aboriginal network groups.”

Maxim Voronov, principal investigator, Marketing, International Business and Strategy, and Dirk De Clercq, Organizational Behaviour, Human Resource Management, Entrepreneurship and Ethnics, were awarded a Standard Research Grant of $85,024 for “Creating symbolic value in commercial cultural production: The Ontario wine industry.”

Lianxi Zhou, Marketing, International Business and Strategy, and a colleague from HEC Montreal, were awarded a Standard Research Grant of $66,194 for “Consumer responses to negative brand publicity: The role of informational characteristics, risk perception, and perceived degree of control.”

Mary Breunig, Recreation and Leisure Studies, and a colleague from Lakehead University, were awarded a Standard Research Grant of $24,944 for “Evaluating the impact of integrated environmental studies programs in Ontario.”

Miya Narushima, principal investigator, and Jian Liu, Community Health Sciences, were awarded a Standard Research Grant of $75,867 for “Community-based lifelong learning for active aging: A case study of public continuing education programs for seniors in Toronto.”

Philip Wilson, principal investigator, and Diane Mack, Physical Education and Kinesiology, along with a colleague from Dalhousie University, were awarded a Standard Research Grant of $163,067 for “Understanding behavioural persistence in weight-loss programs: An application of self-determination theory.”

Lynn McCleary, Nursing, and a colleague from the University of Toronto were awarded a Letter of Intent grant of $20,000 to make a formal application for “Engaged scholarship: Evaluating community care for older adults,” through the Community-Universities Research Alliances (CURA). Candidates must receive a Letter of Intent before making a formal application.

The Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council (SSHRC) is the federal agency that promotes and supports university-based research and training in the humanities and social sciences. Through its programs and policies, the council enables the highest levels of research excellence in Canada, and facilitates knowledge sharing and collaboration across research disciplines, universities and all sectors of society. Created by an act of Parliament in 1977, SSHRC is governed by a Council that reports to Parliament through the Minister of Industry.

Through research and training programs, SSHRC fosters the development of talented and creative people who become leaders across the private and public sectors and who are critical to Canada’s success in the globalized 21st century.