Articles by author: cdaigle

  • Rescheduled round-table: “More Than Human. Posthumanism, Human-Technological Relations, and Bioethics

    This round-table will now take place on May 4th, 2022, 16:00 (EST). Please see the poster for how to join the meeting.

     

  • Round-table: More than Human: Posthumanism, Human-Technological Relations, Bioethics

    The ‘Posthumanism: Cinema Philosophy Media’ Roundtable Series presents:

    MORE THAN HUMAN: Posthumanism, Human-Technological Relations, and Bioethics

    March 29, 2022 @ 7:00 P.M.

    Zoom Meeting: https://wilfrid-laurier.zoom.us/meeting/register/tJEsduqtpzsoGdBH4VOdDieN4ykgVKgw4GKK

    Biohacking, biomedical advancements, bioengineering, and transhumanist hopes, aspirations and fixations – How do technological advancements extend what it means to be human?

    This roundtable discussion seeks to break down the barriers between different perspectives upon and methods of analysis of transhumanism, biohacking, and bioethics. From film studies, to a cultural studies lens on biohacking as a subculture, to the latest mind-body interface technologies, how we take up our relationships to and with technological advancements is central to how we understand what it means to be (or not to be) human.

    Join an engaging roundtable with:

    • Jeremy Hunsinger, Associate Professor, Department of Communication Studies, Wilfrid Laurier University
    • Andrea Austin, Associate Professor, Department of English and Film Studies, Wilfrid Laurier University
    • William Brown, Assistant Professor, Department of Theatre and Film, University of British Columbia
    • Alex Pearlman, Communications Director, Science and Technology Reporter, Research Affiliate at MIT Media LabConcentric by Ginkgo

    For more information contact: Russell Kilbourn rkilbourn@wlu.ca or Julia Empey empe3530@mylaurier.ca

    Categories: event, news

  • Talk by Dr. Myra Hird on Waste

    Dr. Myra Hird (Queen’s University) will be giving a talk on “Waste: a Tale of Two Problems” on March 21st, 2022, 11:00-12:00 ET. This talk is jointly hosted by the Environmental Sustainability Research Centre, the Sustainability, Science and Society program (SSAS) and the Posthumanism Research Institute (PRI) and will be live-streamed here.

    Categories: event, news

  • Decentering the Nature-Culture Divide in Diplomacy

    The North American Cultural Diplomacy Initiative (NACDI) invites you to attend our virtual panel, Decentering the Nature-Culture Divide in Diplomacy, which carries forward the issues and debates that foregrounded our 2021 summit, Players: We Are All Practitioners. Hosted by NACDI in partnership with the Posthumanism Research Institute, our virtual event will be held on 16 February 2022 at 2:00 – 3:30 pm (ET), 1:00-2:30 pm (CT), and 11 am-12:30 am (PT).

    **Click here to register to attend this free event!*

    Building on the North American Cultural Diplomacy Initiative’s work to address the question of culture’s role in diplomacy, this event focuses on statist diplomacy as a Eurocentric practice to advance a discussion of diplomacy that is refracted by applying posthumanist and post-anthropocentrist lenses. Taking as a starting point forms of diplomacy on the North American continent that were, and continue to be practiced by Indigenous Peoples, the panel also brings into play Islamic perspectives and posthumanist discourses.

    This panel suggests that to properly examine “cultural diplomacy,” the centrality of a nation-state-based understanding of “culture” that excludes other ways of knowing and stands in opposition to “nature” must be problematized. Viewing diplomatic practice and orientation through the lens of what Glen Coulthard (2014) terms “grounded normativity”, this session challenges the ways in which Cartesian dualism of nature and culture provide a limited understanding of being in and relating to the world. Re-orientating our relationship to time and place, grounded normativity centers histories, practices, and ways of relating to one another which contest the state-centric and settler-colonial orders and broadens the scope of diplomacy to include non-human players.

    Categories: event, news

  • Roundtable on Posthumanism, Cinema, Memory

    We are happy to co-host this round-table event with a special guest presentation by Dr. Anna Amza Reading. The event takes place on Monday February 28, 2022, 11:00-14:00 EDT.

    What does it mean to approach memory from a critical posthumanist perspective?

    Please join us for a roundtable discussion on the intersection of cinema, posthumanism, and memory studies. The topic of memory affords unique opportunities for posthumanist inquiry, including (but not limited to): object-oriented memory; environmental memory; animal memory; Indigenous memory; feminist memory; radical alterity and memory; post-anthropomorphic memory; post-apocalyptic memory; multidirectional memory. Rosi Braidotti revalues memory as one of the “main criteria for posthuman theory,” a positive life-affirming force of imagination. Cary Wolfe maintains that, in a certain sense, memory has always been posthuman: in its cultural and institutional forms it has historically relied on prosthetic supports, technologies like writing, for the recording and storage of information or knowledge. Of these technical supports, writing is the “fundamental historically identifiable form” of the “exteriorization of memory.” This is the de-ontologization characteristic of modern memory whose roots, of course, are considerably older than modernity—a modern memory now supported by digital audiovisual media. In thinking about memory and its relation to cinema, posthumanist theory tends to privilege science fiction film, whether dystopian or otherwise. Yet, close attention to audiovisual style also allows for a critical interrogation of such questions as whether or not a given film text actually represents a given posthumanist concept, properly speaking, or whether the film ultimately perpetuates some form of anthropocentric or neo-humanist understanding of the relations between the human as currently understood and what comes after or falls outside or beyond. It remains to be seen to what degree posthuman memory names a modality of human experience that is as much about the present or future, marshalling these temporalities in the service of a memory that transcends a mere relation to the past—a ‘making present of the past’ (Richard Terdiman)—with the potential to operate at a global scale far beyond discrete social groupings. The ultimate question, perhaps, is whether such a posthuman memory will still wear a human face.

    Our four panelists will share their varied approaches to memory studies, posthumanism, and cinema in a discussion that hopes to further illuminate how audiovisual media as “prosthetic support” expresses and engages with memory in a posthumanist context. This will be an online event supported by Zoom to be held Monday February 28, 11:00am-2:00pm ET..

    Please see the poster for Zoom webinar registration information. Also available here.

  • New play i/O by partner theatre company Post Humains on stage Nov 16 – Dec 4

    Thanks to a SSHRC Partnership Engage grant, the PRI has collaborated with the Montreal theatre company Post Humains for the research-creation that led to the elaboration of their play i/O. The play is presented at the Centre du Théâtre d’Aujourd’hui, salle Michelle-Rossignol, from November 16 to December 4, 2021, in Montreal. For an interview with the playwright and director of the company, Dominique Leclerc, see here.

    Categories: news

  • Public talk by Rick Dolphijn – October 7, 2021

    Rick Dolphijn (Utrecht) will give a presentation related to his most recent book on October 7, 2021. The talk takes place 10:00-11:30 (EDT) on Zoom. Please see link below to log on or contact Mitch Goldsmith (mg12vh@brocku.ca).

    “The Wounds that Matter” 

    In my recently published monograph, The Philosophy of Matter; a meditation, one of the key concepts is ‘the wound’. Much inspired by literature and the arts, this talk aims to explore woundedness in different ways; how wounds bring us together? How are we “born to embody” our wounds, as Joë Bousquet would say it? And what is pain teaching us about the non-fascist life?

    Dr. Rick Dolphijn is an Associate Professor at Media and Culture Studies, Utrecht University, and a Honorary Professor at the University of Hong Kong (2017-2023). He published widely on new materialism, posthumanism and affect theory. His monograph The Philosophy of Matter: a meditation was published with Bloomsbury Academic in August 2021.

     

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    Categories: event, news

  • 20th Anniversary of Atanarjuat – “Posthumanism: Philosophy Cinema Media” inaugural event

    The first of a series of events in the “Posthumanism: Philosophy Cinema Media” series takes place on October 6, 2021. This event celebrates the 20th anniversary of Zacharias Kunuk’s Atanarjuat. Kunuk and team members will take part in the round-table also featured a panel of international scholars. Registration here or by scanning the QR code on the poster.

    Posthumanism: Cinema Philosophy Media: A Roundtable Series

    Announcing the Inaugural Event:

    ‘Running Time’: Atanarjuat 20th Anniversary Roundtable and Celebration

     Oct. 06, 2021, 6:00-9:00 pm EST (via Zoom)

    Twenty years ago this fall saw the release of Atanarjuat, The Fast Runner: “an exciting action thriller set in ancient Igloolik, the film unfolds as a life-threatening struggle of love, jealousy, murder and revenge between powerful natural and supernatural characters” (IsumaTV). The first-ever feature fiction film in Inuktitut, written, directed, produced, and performed by an Inuit cast and crew, Atanarjuat went on to win six Genie awards, including Best Picture and the Camera d’or for best first feature film at the 2001 Cannes International Film Festival, among many other awards. In 2015 it was voted the best Canadian film of all time.

    Well before contemporary debates around identity politics, cultural appropriation, and equity, diversity, and inclusivity, Atanarjuat set the terms of the discussion while laying out a vision for the future of Indigenous peoples in Canada and around the world—a vision of self-determination, however, that has yet to be fulfilled. The past twenty years has seen Atanarjuat’s significance manifest in several different ways: as a story the film continues to resonate all over the world with Indigenous and non-Indigenous audiences alike; as cultural object the film stands as one of the most significant achievements of Indigenous self-representation; as a film Atanarjuat represents a great work of art cinema.

    This roundtable brings together key members of the original team behind the film—writer-director Zacharias Kunuk and Lucy Tulugarjuk (Puja)—with an international panel of scholars: Erich Fox Tree (Associate Professor, Religion and Culture, WLU); Jenny Kerber (Associate Professor, English and Film Studies); Pauline Clague (Associate Professor, Manager of Cultural Resilience Hub, Jumbunna Institute for Indigenous Education & Research, University of Technology, Sydney); Simone Bignall (Senior Researcher in the Jumbunna Research Hub for Indigenous Nations and Collaborative Futures, University of Technology, Sydney).

    For more information contact: Russell Kilbourn > rkilbourn@wlu.ca

    Zoom registration link: https://wilfrid-laurier.zoom.us/meeting/register/tJUrcOqgpz8jGtazM3ZJ4HbhSV11jvpAf3nc

    The organizers wish to thank SSHRC, the Posthumanism Research Institute, the WLU Student’s Union, the Faculty of Arts, and the Department of English and Film Studies for supporting this event.

    Categories: event, news

  • First issue out! Interconnections. Journal of Posthumanism/Interconnexions. Revue de posthumanisme

    We are proud to announce the publication of the inaugural issue of our journal. You can read it here.

    Categories: news

  • Posthumanism and Education Round-table – December 8, 2020

    Please join our panel of speakers to discuss posthumanist perspectives on education on Tuesday December 8, 2020, 2:00 to 3:30 pm (EST).

    To join the meeting, click on the link on the PDF file (downloadable here) or click here.

    Categories: event, news