Teaching

Office Hrs for Winter 2020: 

Mondays 5pm-6pm

Office Location: MCB 331

Applications of computers to management and analysis of data, including data entry, statistical procedures and interpretation of output, using SPSS.

Lectures/lab: 3 hours per week.

Restriction: open to PSYC (single or combined) and NEUR majors with a minimum 77 percent major average, a minimum of 8.0 overall credits and 3.0 PSYC credits above PSYC 1F90.

Prerequisite(s)PSYC 1F90 and 2F23.

NoteNeuroscience majors with a minimum 70 percent major average and a minimum of 8.0 overall credits may register. Contact Psych Department.

Integrative examination of the neural basis of human language, with an emphasis on contemporary methods in cognitive neuroscience.

Topics include:

  • Methodology (e.g., behavioural and neuroimaging)
  • Biological and developmental bases of language
  • Foundations of language
  • Word and sentence comprehension

Lectures, seminar: 3 hours per week.

Restriction: open to PSYC (single or combined), NEUR, SPLS majors and PSYC minors until date specified in Registration guide. Students must have a minimum of 8.0 overall credits and 1.0 PSYC credit above PSYC 1F90.

Prerequisite(s): PSYC 1F90; one of PSYC 2P20, PSYC 2P49, PSYC 2P35 or PSYC 2P36; or permission of the instructor.

Methodology (e.g., behavioural and neuroimaging), second language acquisition (in children and adults), social psychological aspects of bilingualism and cognitive consequences of bilingualism.

Format: Lectures, seminar, 3 hours per week.

Restrictions: open to PSYC (single or combined), NEUR, SPLS majors and PSYC minors until date specified in Registration guide. Students must have a minimum of 8.0 credits and 3.0 PSYC credits above PSYC 1F90.

Prerequisites: Prerequisite(s): PSYC 1F90 or permission of the instructor.

Notes: Must hold a minimum of 8.0 overall credits or 3.0 PSYC credits greater than 1F90. Open to majors and minors until July 18, 2019. Cli ck on course name to see restriction for list.

Previous courses taught

For an interesting perspective on this course, see the attached article by Prof. Ruth McQuirter Scott, who took this course for credit.  Please scroll to pg. 25 to read the article “Professor as Student” to see her perspective on the class.

In this course, students examined introductory principles of generative grammar over the course of two terms (Fall and Winter).

Topics included:

  • An introduction to the field of generative grammar (includes defining Universal Grammar)
  • Morphology
  • Phonetics
  • Phonology
  • Syntax
  • Language typology and language families
  • Sociolinguistics

An introduction to brain and language.

Topics included:

Assumptions of cognitive neuropsychology
Neuroanatomy
Imaging techniques
Research methods
Processing language in visual and auditory modalities
The course ends with an in-house conference where students present posters on research areas in brain and language.

Here’s a note from a former student and TA in that class, now pursuing her MSc. in Speech Language Pathology at the University of Alberta:

“First of all something that you can tell your Neurolinguistics students. The research methods class that I am taking here is the exact same format as our Neurolinguistics course except that we do our own research.

We have to do a research proposal, research paper, poster and presentation, which is just another example of how helpful the Neurolinguistics class was. While the majority of the class was very nervous, I felt well equipped. As well, there is a strong neuroscience component to the material we’re covering in my course on anatomy and physiology, so they will need to know that material in their masters. Thank you for that class!”

An introduction to generative syntax.

Topics included:

Assumptions in generative grammar
What is the lexicon
Constituency tests and tree structure
Argument structure
Theta theory
Binding
Anaphora