2004-2005 Undergraduate Calendar

History  
Chair Carmela K. Patrias Undergraduate Officer TBA Professors Emeriti Craig R. Hanyan, Robert R. Taylor Professors Rosemary Hale, John A. Sainsbury Associate Professors Jane A. McLeod, Carmela K. Patrias, David H. Schimmelpenninck, Murray R. Wickett Assistant Professors Michael D. Driedger, A. Bonny Ibhawoh, R. Andrew McDonald, Gillian McGillivray, Daniel Samson, Barnett B. Singer, Mark G. Spencer, Donald A. Wright, Joanne Wright  
General Information Go to top of document
Administrative Assistant Heidi Klose 905-688-5550, extension 3500 Mackenzie Chown C420 https://brocku.ca/history/ Historians explore changes in past societies, cultures and peoples. They examine cultural, artistic, political, economic, intellectual, as well as military and national history. Their interests range from the history of individuals and local communities to studies of nations and international relations. They analyze the causes and consequences of significant change over time. They seek to illuminate the past. The study of history involves surveying and gathering evidence and evaluating, interpreting and refining it by constructing clear and logical arguments on the basis of that evidence. Within the requirements indicated under the Honours program and Pass program, the Department allows students considerable flexibility in the selection of HIST courses. There are no mandatory courses and only a few upper-level courses have prerequisites. The Department normally offers four to six full credit and 30-35 half-credit courses, both lecture and seminar courses, in any one year. Courses not offered in one year are normally offered the following year, so that a two-year rotation pattern is in operation. To assist students in refining their analytical and critical skills, weekly seminars are a crucial part of every history course. In many courses individual students are given the responsibility of organizing and leading discussions on particular topics. The Department of History recommends combining History with other disciplines, such as Child and Youth Studies, Classics, Communication Studies, Community Health Sciences, Economics, English Language and Literature, Geography, Labour Studies, Philosophy, Political Science, Psychology, Sociology, Women's Studies and languages.  
Language Requirement for Humanities Majors Go to top of document
Students in the Department of History are required to complete one credit in a language other than English.Where half-credit courses are used to satisfy the requirement, both half credits must be in the same language. One credit numbered 1(alpha)00 in French, German, Italian, Latin, Russian or Spanish is recommended.  
Program Notes Go to top of document
1.  History majors must take one credit outside of History to satisfy their Social Science context requirement.  
2.  Courses numbered 3(alpha)90 or above are restricted to students with a minimum of three credits numbered 2(alpha)00 to 2(alpha)99 or permission of the instructor.  
3.  Students in the Honours and Pass programs in History have the option of fulfilling one of their required History credits by taking two half or one full credit(s) from those listed under the heading "Departmental Offerings which are Approved History Credits". Students choosing this option must meet all prerequisites for the course(s) selected.  
4.  The courses chosen must be approved by the Chair or Undergraduate Officer, as comprising an acceptable program.  
5.  In all 20 credit degree programs, at least 12 credits must be numbered 2(alpha)00 or above, six of which must be numbered 2(alpha)90 or above and of these, three must be numbered 3(alpha)90 or above. In all 15 credit degree programs, at least seven credits must be numbered 2(alpha)00 or above, three of which must be numbered 2(alpha)90 or above.  
Honours Program Go to top of document
Eleven HIST credits are required for an Honours degree. Year 1
- One of HIST 1F95, 1F96, 1P92 and 1P93
- one Science context credit
- one Social Science context credit (see program note 1)
- one language credit other than English (see language requirement)
- one elective credit
Years 2 and 3
- Six HIST credits numbered 1(alpha)90 to 3(alpha)99
- four elective credits (see program note 2)
Year 4
- One HIST credit
- one HIST credit numbered 3(alpha)90 or above
- two HIST credits numbered 4(alpha)00 to 4(alpha)99
- one elective credit
 
Concurrent BA (Honours)/BEd Go to top of document
The Department of History and the Faculty of Education co-operate in offering two Concurrent BA (Honours)/BEd programs. The History BA (Honours)/BEd program combines the BA Honours program or BA Integrated Studies Honours program with the teacher education programs for students interested in teaching at the Intermediate/Senior level (grades 7-12) and at the Junior/Intermediate level (grades 4-10). Refer to the Education - Concurrent BA (Honours)/BEd (Intermediate/Senior) or Education - Concurrent BA Integrated Studies (Honours)/BEd (Junior/Intermediate) program listings for further information.  
Pass Program Go to top of document
Seven HIST credits are required for a Pass degree. Satisfactory completion of the first three years of the Honours program entitles a student to apply for a Pass degree.  
Combined Major Programs Go to top of document
Students may take a combined major in History and a second discipline. For requirements in the other discipline, the student should consult the relevant department/centre. It should be noted that not all departments/centres provide a combined major option. Honours
- Seven HIST credits
- seven credits from the co-major discipline
- one language credit other than English (see language requirement)
- one Science context credit
- one Social Science context credit
- three elective credits
History and Great Books/Liberal Studies (Honours only) Consult the Great Books/Liberal Studies entry for a listing of the course requirements. Pass
- Five HIST credits
- five credits from the co-major discipline
- one language credit other than English (see language requirement)
- one Science context credit
- one Social Science context credit
- two elective credits
 
Minor in History Go to top of document
Students in other disciplines can obtain a Minor in History within their degree program by completing the following courses with a minimum 60 percent overall average:
- One HIST credit numbered 1(alpha)90 to 1(alpha)99
- two HIST credits
- two HIST credits numbered 2(alpha)90 or above
 
Approved History Courses Offered by Other Departments Go to top of document
Students in the Pass and Honours programs in History have the option of fulfilling one of their required History credits by taking two half or one full credit course(s) from those listed below. Students choosing this option must meet all prerequisites for the course(s) selected. ABST 2F90 Studies in Hodinohsonni History I ABST 2F91 Studies in Aboriginal History (in Mohawk) ABST 2F92 Studies in Hodinohsonni History II CANA 2P91 Culture and Power in Canada I: Cultural Communities CANA 2P92 Culture and Power in Canada II: Cultural Institutions CLAS 3P07 History of Early Greece CLAS 3P08 History of Classical Greece CLAS 3P09 History of the Roman Republic CLAS 3P10 History of the Early Roman Empire CLAS 3P61 Gender and Society in Ancient Greece * COMM 4P55 Advertising, Mass Media and Culture (also offered as PCUL 4P55) ECON 2P09 Canadian Economic History ECON 2P10 United States Economic History ECON 2P11 European Economic History ECON 3P01 History of Economic Thought I ECON 3P02 History of Economic Thought II ENGL 2P51 Literature of the British Empire (also offered as INTL 2P51) ENGL 3F91 History of the Language FILM 2F90 Film History and Research Methods * FILM 2P20 Introduction to Popular Culture (also offered as COMM/PCUL 2P20) * FILM 2P21 Canadian Popular Culture (also offered as COMM/PCUL 2P21) * FILM 2P54 Documentary Film (also offered as COMM 2P54 and SOCI 2P54) * FILM 2P56 Canadian Cinema (also offered as COMM 2P56) * FILM 3P54 Issues in Documentary Film (also offered as COMM 3P54 and SOCI 3P54) * FILM 3P56 Issues in Canadian Cinema (also offered as COMM 3P56) FILM 3P95 National Cinema * FILM 3P97 Gender and Film (also offered as COMM/WISE 3P97) * FILM 3P98 Screened Women (also offered as COMM/WISE 3P98) GBLS 1F90 Great Books Seminar I: The Individual Society GBLS 2P94 Great Books Seminar II: Epics and Ethics GBLS 3P90 Great Books Seminar III GBLS 4P10 Great Books Seminar IV GEOG 2P03 Urban Geography (also offered as ENVI 2P03) GEOG 2P06 Cultural and Historical Geography GEOG 2P50 Geography of Canada GEOG 3P45 Urban Growth Processes and Planning GEOG 3P86 Themes in Cultural Geography GEOG 3P87 Themes in Historical Geography * ITAL 2P40 Early to High Renaissance Art and Architecture (also offered as VISA 2P40) MUSI 1F50 History of Music from Medieval to Modern Times MUSI 3P96 History of Music in the Baroque Era MUSI 3P97 History of Music in the 20th Century MUSI 3P98 History of Music in the Classical Era MUSI 3P99 History of Music in the Romantic Era MUSI 4P50 History of Music in the Middle Ages MUSI 4P51 History of Music in the Renaissance MUSI 4P52 Eighteenth-Century Italian Opera MUSI 4P53 Methodology and Research in Musicology MUSI 4P54 Singspiel and German Romantic Opera POLI 2F12 The Government and Politics of Canada POLI 2P91 Political Theory I POLI 2P92 Political Theory II POLI 2P93 Liberal Democracy POLI 2P97 The Government and Politics of the United States POLI 3P11 Local Government * POLI 3P16 Politics in Québec (also offered as CANA 3P16) POLI 3P28 Canadian Foreign Policy POLI 3P43 Politics in the Developing World POLI 3P45 Politics in Advanced Democratic Systems * POLI 4P01 The Philosophy of Law (also offered as GBLS 4P01) * POLI 4P02 Ancient Political Theory (also offered as GBLS 4P02) * POLI 4P04 Politics and Tyranny (also offered as GBLS 4P04) POLI 4P14 Federalism in Canada * POLI 4P15 Canadian Political Economy (also offered as LABR 4P15) POLI 4P22 Canada and the Developing World POLI 4P47 Arab Politics PSYC 4P92 History of Psychology VISA 2P41 Baroque Art and Architecture VISA 2P50 Canadian Identities: From Nouvelle France to the Mid-20th Century VISA 2P51 Canadian Art since 1960: Contemporary Trends * VISA 2P90 Art in Revolution: 1750-1851 (also offered as GBLS 2Q90) * VISA 2P91 Modernism, Modernity and Contemporaneity: 1851-1907 (also offered as GBLS 2Q91) VISA 3P05 The European Avant-Garde: 1905-1970 VISA 3P06 The American Avant-Garde: 1912-1970 WISE 2P91 The Status of Women: Historical Perspectives  
Course Descriptions Go to top of document
Note that not all courses are offered in every session. Refer to the applicable term timetable for details. # Indicates a cross listed course * Indicates primary offering of a cross listed course  
Prerequisites and Restrictions Go to top of document
Students must check to ensure that prerequisites are met. Students may be deregistered, at the request of the instructor, from any course for which prerequisites and/or restrictions have not been met. HIST 1F95 World History since 1914 Major political, social, economic and cultural trends of the 20th century, with prime focus on developments in Europe and the way they have affected the rest of the world; the decline of Europe in global political and economic terms. Topics include the world wars, the Russian Revolution, fascism, the Holocaust, the Cold War, decolonization and conflict and its resolution in the international, political and social spheres. Lectures, seminar, 3 hours per week. HIST 1F96 The Americas Comparative themes in the history of the Americas from pre-Columbian times to the present, emphasizing class, colonialism, economics, gender, labour, political systems, race, religion, revolution and war. Lectures, seminar, 3 hours per week. HIST 1P92 Early Medieval Europe Western Europe from the late Roman Empire to the year 1000 emphasizing political, social, religious and economic change as the Roman Empire fragmented and was replaced with regional power blocs and identities. Division of the Roman Empire, development of Germanic successor states, rise of Christianity, conversion processes, rise of Europe, and nature of society. Lectures, seminar, 3 hours per week. HIST 1P93 The High Middle Ages Expansion of European society 1000-1350 and the 'age of adversity' marking the end of the middle ages, 1350-1500. Thematic treatment of royal and papal power, Norman Conquests and Crusades, monastic, intellectual and architectural expansion, as well as late medieval crises in church and society including Hundred Years War and the Black Death. Lectures, seminar, 3 hours per week. HIST 2F20 The Origins of Modern Britain, 1485-1832 Political, religious, and economic forces that shaped British society and led to the country's emergence as an industrial and global power. Lectures, seminar, 3 hours per week. HIST 2F92 Modern East Asia Survey of East Asian history from the 17th century to the present focussing on China and Japan. Lectures, seminar, 3 hours per week. HIST 2P01 Pre-Confederation Canada Canadian history from the pre-contact period to 1867. Lectures, seminar, 3 hours per week. Completion of this course will replace previous assigned grade in HIST 2P07 and 2P11. HIST 2P02 Post-Confederation Canada Canadian history from 1867 to the present. Lectures, seminar, 3 hours per week. Completion of this course will replace previous assigned grade in HIST 2P11 and 2P12. HIST 2P03 Early Medieval Britain 400-1000: Celts, Saxons, and Vikings The end of Roman Britain to the Danish invasions and conquest of 1013-16. Migrations, invasions, and settlements of Anglo-Saxons, Scots, and Vikings; Romano-British and Brittonic society; quest for King Arthur; processes of state formation; heroic society; warfare; conversion to Christianity. Lectures, seminar, 3 hours per week. HIST 2P04 Medieval Britain1000-1485: The Four Nations Medieval Britain from the Danish invasions and conquest of 1013-16 until the Wars of the Roses. Emphasis on Celtic societies; Norman Conquest and impact; kings and kingship; church and monasticism; Anglo-Celtic relations, including the Scottish Wars of Independence and the English conquest of Wales. Lectures, seminar, 3 hours per week. *HIST 2P05 Women Thinkers in Western History (also offered as WISE 2P05) Key women thinkers, including Mary Wollstonecraft, Virginia Woolf and Simone de Beavoir, examined in historical context emphasizing European and British intellectuals; nature and special problems associated with studying "women's history." Lectures, seminar, 3 hours per week. HIST 2P15 Glory and Despair: The United States 1607-1865 United States history and culture from the invasion of the North American continent by Europeans to the break-up of the Union in the Civil War. Topics include contact with Native peoples, origins of slavery, Puritanism, economic development, the Revolution, the Constitution, growth of transportation, political parties, abolitionism, sectional conflict, and the Civil War. Lectures, seminar, 3 hours per week. Completion of this course will replace previous assigned grade in HIST 2P79 and 2P82. HIST 2P16 Ambiguities of Greatness: The United States 1860 to the Present United States since the Civil War. Emphasis on industrialization and post-industrialism, empire building, race, gender relations, world wars, Cold War, consumerism, youth rebellion and popular culture. Lectures, seminar, 3 hours per week. Completion of this course will replace previous assigned grade in HIST 2P83. HIST 2P25 Revolutions in Communication Major developments in the history of communication from the invention of writing until the modern information age. Lectures, seminar, 3 hours per week. HIST 2P34 Seventeenth-Century Europe, 1566-1715 Survey of the history of continental Europe between the Netherlands Revolt and the death of Louis XIV. Topics include absolutism and its limits, religious controversy, developments in science, the witch craze and the effects of colonial expansion. Lectures, seminar, 3 hours per week. HIST 2P41 Eighteenth-Century Europe, 1715-1789 Demographic, economic and structural changes as they affected the nobility, bourgeoisie and popular classes; changes in patterns of criminality, riot and popular mentality; war as a stimulus of social reform; the Enlightenment in its social and cultural context and the origins of the French Revolution. Lectures, seminar, 3 hours per week. HIST 2P42 Revolutionary Europe, 1789-1815 The French Revolution and its European impact emphasizing its origins, its role in the development of European political culture and its impact on the experience of women. Topics include the failure of the constitutional monarchy and the counter-revolution. Lectures, seminar, 3 hours per week. HIST 2P51 Europe, 1815-1914 Political, social and cultural changes in the subcontinent when liberal, imperialist and industrializing Europe was still a dominant global power. Lectures, seminar, 3 hours per week. HIST 2P55 The Culture of War from the Renaissance to the 20th Century Changing character of warfare and its consequences since 1500. Lectures, seminar, 3 hours per week. *HIST 2P61 Columbus' World, 1400-1600 (also offered as INTL 2P61) Comparison of the major civilizations of the Americas, Asia, and Europe, as well as the growing contacts between them. Lectures, seminar, 3 hours per week. *HIST 2P62 Early Africa (also offered as INTL 2P62) Social political, cultural and economic history of Africa before and during the era of European colonialism until the end of the 19th century. Lectures, seminar, 3 hours per week. *HIST 2P63 Modern Africa (also offered as INTL 2P63) Social political, cultural and economic history of modern Africa. Lectures, seminar, 3 hours per week. HIST 2P91 Europe's Reformations, 1450-1650 Origins, course and consequences of the division of Western Christendom into Protestant and Catholic factions in the 16th century. Lectures, seminar, 3 hours per week. Completion of this course will replace previous assigned grade in HIST 2F90. HIST 2P96 Early Russia Russian history from its beginnings in the Kievan period (ninth century) to the end of Catherine the Great's reign (1796). Lectures, seminar, 3 hours per week. HIST 2P98 Modern Russia Politics, society and culture from 19th-century Imperial Russia to the Soviet Union. Lectures, seminar, 3 hours per week. *HIST 2P99 Ideas and Culture before 1850 (also offered as GBLS 2P99) Major developments in European intellectual and cultural life, such as the Renaissance, the Scientific Revolution, the Enlightenment, Romanticism, and the emergence of modern ideologies. Lectures, seminar, 3 hours per week. HIST 2Q90 Canada: Nations Transformed Themes in late 19th- and early 20th-century Canadian history. Lectures, seminar, 3 hours per week. *HIST 2Q95 Women in North America (also offered as WISE 2Q95) Major themes in the history of women in Canada and the United States: native and European women in New France and British North America; women in the American Revolution; the lives of enslaved women; women and industrialization; women in the west; suffrage and social reform; women and the two world wars; and feminism in the 1960s and 1970s. Lectures, seminar, 3 hours per week. *HIST 2Q96 Women in the Pre-Modern World (also offered as WISE 2Q96) Women's lives before 1800; how women's experience of historical phenomena differed from that of men; special problems in studying "women's history." Lectures, seminar, 3 hours per week. HIST 2V90-2V99 History in its Environment Study of the history of a country or region in its own cultural and geographical context. Background preparation and research preceding an intensive study period on location. Lectures, seminar, 3 hours per week. Restriction: permission of the Department. Note: given in English. Students are responsible for travel, accommodation and other expenses. Completion of this course will replace previous assigned grade in SPAN 2V90-2V99. HIST 3F20 Modern Britain Politics, economy, society and culture in the British Isles from the early 19th century to the present. Lectures, seminar, 3 hours per week. Note: HIST 2F20 recommended. HIST 3F81 Modern Latin America Latin America since 1810. Emphasis on wars of independence, personalistic rule, labour, immigration, the role of the Roman Catholic Church, militarism, revolutions, failures of modernization and inter-American relations. Lectures, seminar, 3 hours per week. *HIST 3P00 Ideas and Culture since 1850 (also offered as GBLS 3P00) Intellectual and cultural developments in Europe and North America during the late 19th and 20th centuries. Lectures, seminar, 3 hours per week. Note: one or more of HIST 2F20, 2P02, 2P16, 2P51 recommended. HIST 3P01 Canadian Prime Ministers, 1867 to the Present Themes in Canadian history and historiography, focussing on prime ministers. Lectures, seminar, 3 hours per week. HIST 3P15 American Enlightenment Intellectual and cultural history of the thirteen colonies and the early republic. Origins, manifestation, and decline of the Enlightenment as seen through the life and writings of seminal American thinkers and less well-known figures. Transatlantic focus on dissemination of ideas and their impact. Lectures, seminar, 3 hours per week. Note: HIST 2P15 recommended. HIST 3P30 The Viking Age Follows the Vikings from their Scandinavian homelands as they raid, trade and settle throughout Europe and the North Atlantic, convert to Christianity, establish new kingdoms and eventually assimilate into medieval Christendom. Lectures, seminar, 3 hours per week. Note: HIST 1P92 or 1P93 recommended. Completion of this course will replace previous assigned grade in HIST 3Q90 or 3V96. HIST 3P40 France and its Empire Since the Revolution Political, social, intellectual history domestically, and expansion and stresses abroad. Lectures, seminar, 3 hours per week. Note: HIST 2P41 or 2P42 recommended. HIST 3P50 Directed Research In exceptional circumstances, a student with honours standing may be permitted to pursue directed research using primary sources. Topics to be defined in consultation with a faculty member who is willing to supervise the student. Restriction: permission of the Department. HIST 3P52 African American Experience History and culture since the introduction of peoples from Africa to the North American continent to the present day. Topics include origins of slavery, development of slave culture, varied forms of slave resistance, Civil War and emancipation, rise of sharecropping, formation of ghettos, segregation, the Harlem Renaissance, African Americans in the World Wars, the Civil Rights Movement, urban housing and social problems, rise of rap music. Lectures, seminar, 3 hours per week. Note: HIST 2P16 recommended. Completion of this course will replace previous assigned grade in HIST 3Q92. *HIST 3P60 The World of Genghis Khan: Inner Asia since 500 BCE (also offered as INTL 3P60) History of Mongolia, Tibet and Xinjiang. Political, economic, social and cultural topics. Emphasis on the nomadic encounter with the settled world (China, Russia), including the medieval nomadic invasions, the Great Game and nationalistic policies in the 20th century. Lectures, seminar, 3 hours per week. Note: seminars will include films and primary sources (in translation). HIST 2P96 recommended. *HIST 3P61 Diplomacy of the Pacific Rim (also offered as INTL 3P61) History of relations among the major powers around the Pacific Ocean focussing on China and Japan, and their interaction with the world since the 16th century. Lectures, seminar, 3 hours per week. Note: HIST 2F92 recommended. *HIST 3P62 Global Economic History, 1700-1880 (also offered as INTL 3P62) Cotton, china and opium: development of the world economy in an age of industrial growth. Lectures, seminar, 3 hours per week. Note: at least one second-year history course recommended. *HIST 3P63 Selected Themes in the History of Europe's Global Influence, 1600-1950 (also offered as INTL 3P63) Europe's impact on the world and regional responses. Lectures, seminar, 3 hours per week. Note: HIST 2P51 recommended. HIST 3P64 Africa and the African Diaspora Voluntary and involuntary movements of peoples of African ancestry across the continental homeland, their subsequent dispersion around the world, and return to Africa. Lectures, seminar, 3 hours per week. Note: HIST 2P62 and 2P63 recommended. HIST 3P74 Canadian Immigration and Ethnic History Immigrants, immigration movements, problems of adjustment and government policies. Lectures, seminar, 3 hours per week. *HIST 3P75 Canadian Labour History (also offered as LABR 3P75) Canadian workers and the labour movement from the mid-19th century to the present, combining studies of trade unions with the broader context of the social, community and political life of workers. How gender and race/ethnicity have shaped the working class experience. Lectures, seminar, 3 hours per week. Note: HIST 2P02 recommended. Completion of this course will replace previous assigned grade in HIST (CANA/LABR) 3Q95. HIST 3P90 The Rise and Fall of the Russian Empire The Russian empire and its components over the past 500 years. Topics include expansion, nationalities, diplomacy and the politics of dissolution in the post-Soviet era. Lectures, seminar, 3 hours per week. Note: HIST 2P96 or 2P98 recommended. HIST 3P91 North America's First Nations Topics in the history of North American aboriginal peoples. Lectures, seminar, 3 hours per week. *HIST 3P94 Revolution in Latin America (also offered as SPAN 3Q94) Social, economic, and intellectual roots of revolutions in Mexico, Bolivia, Guatemala, Cuba and Nicaragua. Seminal role of the Mexican Revolution. Lectures, seminar, 3 hours per week. Note: HIST 3F81 recommended. HIST 3P97 United States Foreign Policy since 1945 U.S. foreign policy during the Cold War era; rise of the U.S. to superpower status; consequent global responsibilities. Lectures, seminar, 3 hours per week. Note: HIST 2P16 recommended. HIST 3P98 French Canada The cultural, economic and political institutions of French Canada; analysing the sources of French-English conflict emphasizing such questions as education, cultural values, imperial defence and conscription. Lectures, seminar, 3 hours per week. HIST 3P99 The Challenge to Social Order in 18th-Century England The basis of Hanoverian stability and the threat to it from political factionalism, popular dissent and economic upheaval. Lectures, seminar, 3 hours per week. Note: HIST 2F20 recommended. HIST 3Q05 Canadian Politics in the 20th Century Political developments, themes and institutions in Canada from Laurier to Chretien. Emphasis on the evolution of Canada's political culture, complex relationship between politicians, the electorate and media, and enduring strengths and weaknesses of Canada's parliamentary system. Lectures, seminar, 3 hours per week. Note: HIST 2P02 recommended. HIST 3Q91 Canadian Regional History Selected themes in the history of Canada's regions. Lectures, seminar, 3 hours per week. Note: HIST 2P02 recommended. HIST 3Q93 The Crusades The Crusading Movement 1095-1291, including its growth in western Europe, the crusader kingdoms, crusades outside the Holy Land and the Islamic response to the crusades. Lectures, seminar, 3 hours per week. Completion of this course will replace previous assigned grade in HIST 3V95. HIST 3Q96 Medieval Social and Cultural History Selected topics in European history between 500 and 1500. Seminar, 3 hours per week. HIST 3Q97 History and the North American Environment Overview of human interaction with nature in North America; nature and natural resources as they shape patterns of human life; how attitudes toward nature shape cultural and political life; the consequences of human alterations of the natural world for natural and human communities. Seminar, 3 hours per week. Note: a second-year American or Canadian history course recommended. HIST 3Q98 Myth, Memory and Meaning in Canadian Cultural History (also offered as CANA 3Q98) How different groups and individuals have remembered, commemorated and assigned meanings to the past, focussing primarily on the post-Confederation period. Prerequisite: CANA 2P91, 2P92 (2F91) or two HIST credits numbered 2(alpha)00 to2(alpha)99 or permission of the instructor. Completion of this course will replace previous assigned grade in HIST (CANA) 3V91. HIST 3V90-3V94 Topics in Canadian Cultural History Lectures, seminar, 3 hours per week. Prerequisite: CANA 2P91, 2P92 (2F91), two HIST credits numbered 2(alpha)00 to 2(alpha)99 or permission of the instructor. Note: HIST 2P02 recommended. HIST 3V95-3V99 Topics in Medieval History Lectures, seminar, 3 hours per week. HIST 4F99 Honours Tutorial Directed reading and discussion in the student's selected field in preparation for a comprehensive examination. Restriction: open to HIST (single or combined) majors with approval to year 4 (honours) until the date specified in the BIRT guide and then open to other students with permission of the Department. Note: students must make arrangements before the end of April for tutorials to begin the following school term. Honours students who are interested in this course may begin their reading for HIST 4F99 in year 3. HIST 4V00-4V09 Themes in Literature and History Seminar, 3 hours per week. Restriction: open to HIST (single or combined) majors with approval to year 4 (honours) until the date specified in BIRT guide and then open to other students with permission of the Department. HIST 4V10-4V69 Problems in History Studies of selected problems in different eras of Canadian, American and European history. Topics studied in any given year will focus on a particular theme. Seminar, 3 hours per week. Restriction: open to HIST (single or combined) majors with approval to year 4 (honours) until the date specified in the BIRT guide and then open to other students with permission of the Department. HIST 4V12 2004-2005: Human Rights in Colonial and Post-Colonial Africa Debates and conditions of human rights discourse in Africa in the colonial and post-colonial periods. HIST 4V16 2004-2005: Populism in Latin America How industrialization and urbanization in Latin America led to mass mobilizations and creation of populist regimes. Traditional liberal and Marxist interpretations of these histories, and newer cultural approaches, emphasizing race and gender. HIST 4V28 2004-2005: Origins of Liberalism and Modernity Rise and critique of liberal ideas in the history of political thought from the early modern period to the 20th century. Challenges inherent in liberal modernity, centering on issue of inequality and social alienation. HIST 4V29 2004-2005: Topics in Medieval History Selected topics in Medieval history. HIST 4V38 2004-2005: The Russian Revolution Causes of the Romanov dynasty's collapse and its replacement by Bolshevism. HIST 4V41 2004-2005: The Holocaust Origins, nature, and legacy of the Holocaust. HIST 4V43 2004-2005: Censorship: A Comparative Approach Comparison of attitudes and approaches to censorship in a number of contexts (the Inquisition, the English Civil War, absolute monarchy, the French Revolution and the totalitarian state) between the Middle Ages and the 20th century. HIST 4V61 2004-2005: Histories of the End: Apocalypticism in Perspective History of apocalyptic thought and millenarian movements studied from a comparative perspective.  
Last updated: June 24, 2004 @ 03:43PM