2004-2005 Undergraduate Calendar

Chemistry  
Chair Jeffrey Atkinson Professors Emeriti Martin S. Gibson, Richard R. Hiatt, David C. Moule Professors Ian D. Brindle, J. Stephen Hartman, Tomas Hudlicky, Jack M. Miller, Andrew G. Reynolds, Mary Frances Richardson, Stuart M. Rothstein Associate Professors Jeffrey K. Atkinson, Melanie Pilkington, Art van der Est Assistant Professors Heather L. Gordon, Costa Metallinos Lecturer Roger McLaughlin Adjunct Professor Katrina Brudzinski Senior Demonstrator Gail Neff Senior Demonstrator - Research Technician Donna Vukmanic Co-ordinator, Analytical Services T.R.B. Jones Director, Co-operative Programs Cindy Dunne Co-operative Program Co-ordinator Stuart M. Rothstein  
General Information Go to top of document
Administrative Assistant Christine Skorski 905-688-5550, extension 3406 Mackenzie Chown E206 https://brocku.ca/chemistry Chemistry is the study of matter and its interactions with various forms of energy. Brock students are involved in the analysis, synthesis and purification of substances, determining their structures and properties and explaining the mechanisms of processes. Our programs stress chemical principles and practice through research in organic, inorganic, analytical, physical and theoretical chemistry, with a strong emphasis on the interdisciplinary fields of bio-inorganic and bio-organic chemistry and chemical biophysics. Research interests of the department include development of new chiral ligands, organometallic reagents, and methods for asymmetric synthesis, green chemistry including bacterial dioxygenase-mediated degradation of aromatics, new approaches in natural product synthesis emphasizing morphine alkaloids, design and synthesis of fluorinated inhalation anesthetic agents and unnatural oligo-saccharide conjugates, ligand design and crystal engineering aimed at self-assembly of novel molecule-based materials, organic electrochemistry, energetics of photosynthesis studied by time-resolved electron spin resonance of short-lived paramagnetic intermediates, nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, organometallic mass spectrometry, quantum and computational chemistry, pesticide and trace element analysis, protein affinity labelling and protein-lipid interactions, and structure-activity correlations of anticancer pharmaceuticals. The Honours program in Chemistry is designed to give the student a broad knowledge of chemistry as well as depth in areas in which the student is most interested. A research project must be successfully completed and a thesis written as part of the requirements for an Honours degree. The Honours program and certain combined Honours programs listed below, when taken with CHEM electives, satisfy the requirements for membership in the Chemical Institute of Canada and are the normal requirements for admission to graduate school in chemistry. The Chemistry Co-op program combines academic and work terms over a four and one half year period. Students spend two years in an academic setting, where they acquire the necessary background prior to taking the first work placement. Successful completion of courses in the core areas of Chemistry provides the necessary academic background for the work experience. In addition to the current fees for courses in academic study terms, Chemistry Co-op students are assessed an annual administrative fee (see the Schedule of Fees). Eligibility to continue in the Co-op program is based on the student's major average and non-major average. A student with a minimum 70 percent major average and a minimum 60 percent non-major average will be permitted to continue. A student with a major average lower than 70 percent will not be permitted to continue in the Chemistry Co-op program, but may continue in the non Co-op Chemistry stream. Students admitted to the Chemistry Co-op program must follow the Co-op program schedule. Failure to adhere to the schedule may result in removal from the Chemistry Co-op program. For further information, see the Co-op Programs section of the Calendar, and contact the Department of Chemistry. The requirement for graduation with a Chemistry (Honours) degree is a minimum 70 percent major average and a minimum 60 percent non-major average. The Chemistry Co-op program designation will be awarded to those students who have honours standing and who have successfully completed a minimum of twelve months of Co-op work experience. The equipment available in the Mackenzie Chown Complex is actively used for both teaching and research. Undergraduate students gain hands-on experience in operating modern equipment for separating of complex mixtures, determining molecular structures, and making quantitative measurements. Newer equipment is computer-controlled and is connected to the University's Ethernet backbone. The department also has a variety of computers and UNIX workstations for advanced computation, data interpretation and molecular modelling. Instrumentation includes 200- and 300- MHz NMR cryospectrometers for solution and high-resolution solids studies. A high resolution double focussing magnetic mass spectrometer interfaced to a data acquisition system allows for acquisition of positive and negative ion spectra with EI, CI and FAB sources. A GC interface and linked scanning add to the suite of capabilities of this instrument. A modern ion trap HPLC/MS/MS spectrometer is available with (ESI and APCI) sources and full MS/MS scanning. A dedicated HP quadrupole GC/MSD is also available. The research laboratories are all equipped with modern computer-interfaced equipment including liquid and gas chromatography systems for analytical and preparative work, UV/Visible spectro-photometers, FT-IR spectro-photometers, lasers, DCP and ICP spectrometers, AA spectrometers and an autopolarimeter. This instrumentation is augmented by a range of modern facilities available through the Cool Climate Oenology and Viticulture Institute, which support work in biochemistry, especially work involving proteins, nucleic acids, yeasts and bacteria. Students should consult the Department Chair when planning years 3 and 4 of the BSc (Honours) and BSc with a major programs, or year 3 of the BSc (Pass) program. In addition to its own programs, the Chemistry department participates in combined major programs with six other departments and is also a major participant in the Biochemistry, Biotechnology, Environment, and Oenology and Viticulture programs.  
Program Notes Go to top of document
1.  Professional schools may require an introductory PHYS credit with a lab.  
2.  The elective credits are normally taken from the Faculty of Mathematics and Science (except ASTR 1F00, BIOL 1F25, CHEM 1P00, ERSC 1F90, 1P92, 1P93 and SCIE 1F30).  
3.  COSC 1P93 is recommended. MATH 2F05 is recommended for students interested in physical chemistry and MATH 2P81 and 2P82 are recommended for students interested in analytical chemistry.  
4.  CHEM 3P40 and 3P41 are required for CHEM majors and are highly recommended for combined majors. At least one of these is a prerequisite for most projects in CHEM 4F90 and 4F91 and should be taken in year 3 by students intending to proceed to a year 4 thesis in Chemistry. Combined majors proceeding to research in organic and inorganic chemistry must take CHEM 3P40 while combined majors proceeding to research in analytical, physical, and theoretical chemistry must take CHEM 3P41.  
5.  Students planning to pursue graduate studies in Chemistry are strongly recommended to take at least two and one-half CHEM credits numbered 3(alpha)90 or above covering at least three of the sub- disciplines of physical, inorganic, analytical and organic chemistry, in addition to CHEM 4F90 and 4F91. Chemistry majors planning to pursue graduate studies in biochemistry or biological chemistry are strongly recommended to take CHEM 4P27, 4P67, or 4P68, and two additional year 4 CHEM credits.  
6.  Students with a minimum 70 percent in OAC or Grade 12U chemistry take CHEM 1F92. They may not take CHEM 1P00 without permission from the Department, which is granted only in exceptional cases.  
7.  In all 20 credit degree programs, at least 12 credits must be numbered 2(alpha)00 or above, six of which must be numbered 2(alpha)90 or above and of these, three must be numbered 3(alpha)90 or above. In all 15 credit degree programs, at least seven credits must be numbered 2(alpha)00 or above, three of which must be numbered 2(alpha)90 or above.  
Honours Programs Go to top of document
Year 1
- CHEM 1F92 (see program note 6)
- PHYS 1P21 or 1P91 (recommended; see program note 1)
- one of PHYS 1P22 or 1P92 (recommended; see program note 1)
- MATH 1P01 and 1P02
- one Humanities context credit
- one Social Science context credit
Year 2
- CHEM 2P12, 2P20, 2P21, 2P32, 2P42 and 2P63
- one of PHYS 2P20, 2P31, 2P50, 2P51
- one-half COSC or MATH credit (see program note 3)
- one elective credit (see program note 2)
Year 3
- CHEM 3P40 and 3P41
- two credits from CHEM 3P20, 3P21, 3P31, 3P32, 3P51, 3P53
- one of PHYS 2P20, 2P31, 2P50, 2P51 (not taken in year 2)
- one and one-half elective credits (CHEM 3P60 recommended; see program notes 2 and 5)
Year 4
- CHEM 4F90 and 4F91
- one credit from CHEM 3P20, 3P21, 3P31, 3P32, 3P51, 3P53 (not taken in year 3)
- one CHEM credit numbered 3(alpha)90 or above
- one elective credit (see program notes 2 and 5)
 
Chemistry Co-op (Honours only) Go to top of document
Students admitted to the Chemistry Co-op program must follow the program schedule as listed below. Failure to adhere may result in removal from the program. Year 1
- CHEM 1F92 (see program note 6)
- PHYS 1P21 or 1P91 (recommended; see program note 1)
- one of PHYS 1P22 or 1P92 (recommended; see program note 1)
- MATH 1P01 and 1P02
- one Humanities context credit
- one Social Science context credit
Year 2
- CHEM 2P12, 2P20, 2P21, 2P32, 2P42 and 2P63
- SCIE 0N90
- one of PHYS 2P20, 2P31, 2P50, 2P51
- one-half COSC or MATH credit (see program note 3)
- one elective credit (see program note 2)
Spring/Summer Sessions:
- CHEM 0N01
Year 3 Fall Term:
- CHEM 3P20, 3P31, 3P40 and 3P51
- one of PHYS 2P20, 2P31, 2P50, 2P51 (not taken in year 2) or one-half elective credit
Winter Term:
- CHEM 0N02
Year 4 Fall Term:
- CHEM 0N03
Winter Term:
- CHEM 3P21, 3P32, 3P41, 3P53
- one of PHYS 2P20, 2P31, 2P50, 2P51 (not taken in year 2) or one-half elective credit
Year 5
- CHEM 4F90 and 4F91
- one CHEM credit numbered 3(alpha)90 or above
- two elective credits
 
Research-oriented Co-op (Honours only) Go to top of document
Year 1
- CHEM 1F92 (see program note 6)
- PHYS 1P21 or 1P91 (recommended; see program note 1)
- one of PHYS 1P22 or 1P92 (recommended; see program note 1)
- MATH 1P01 and 1P02
- one Humanities context credit
- one Social Science context credit
Spring/Summer Sessions:
- one-half elective credit
Year 2
- CHEM 2P12, 2P20, 2P21, 2P32, 2P42 and 2P63
- COSC 1P93
- MATH 2F05 or MATH 2P81and 2P82
- one of PHYS 2P20, 2P31, 2P50, 2P51
- SCIE 0N90
Spring/Summer Sessions:
- CHEM 0N01 and 2P98
Year 3 Fall Term:
- CHEM 3P20, 3P31, 3P40 and 3P51
- one of PHYS 2P20, 2P31, 2P50, 2P51 (not taken in year 2), or one-half elective credit
Winter Term:
- CHEM 0N02
Year 4 Fall Term:
- CHEM 0N03 and 3P98
Winter Term:
- CHEM 3P21, 3P32, 3P41and 3P53
- one of PHYS 2P20, 2P31, 2P50, 2P51 (not taken in year 2), or one-half elective credit
Spring/Summer Sessions:
- CHEM 4F90 and 4F91
Year 5 Fall Term:
- one-half CHEM credit numbered 3(alpha)90 or above
- one elective credit (see program note 7)
 
BSc Honours in Chemistry: Environmental stream (Honours only) Go to top of document
The following has a biological content. A similar pattern with ERSC or GEOG courses replacing BIOL courses is possible. Consult the Chair. This program does not satisfy the requirements for membership in the Chemical Institute of Canada. Year 1
- CHEM 1F92 (see program note 6)
- BIOL 1F90
- ENVI 1P90 and 1P91
- MATH 1P01 and 1P02 or MATH 1P97 and 1P98
- PHYS 1P21 or 1P91 (recommended; see program note 1)
- one of PHYS 1P22 or 1P92 (recommended; see program note 1)
Year 2
- CHEM 2P12 or 2P63
- CHEM 2P20, 2P21, 2P32 and 2P42
- BIOL 2Q04
- PHYS 1P23
- one-half BIOL credit
- one Humanities context credit
Year 3
- CHEM 3P40 and 3P41
- two credits from CHEM 3P20, 3P21, 3P31, 3P32, 3P60
- ENVI 3P01 and 3P02
- one elective credit (BIOL recommended)
Year 4
- CHEM 4F90, 4F91 and 4P41
- ENVI 4P88
- one-half CHEM credit numbered 3(alpha)90 or above
- one and one-half elective credits (CHEM or BIOL recommended)
 
BSc with a Major Program Go to top of document
This program differs from the Honours program in that honours standing is not required for entry into year 4, and year 4 does not include the research project and thesis courses (CHEM 4F90 and 4F91). Combined majors should consult the Chair. Year 1
- CHEM 1F92 (see program note 6)
- PHYS 1P21 or 1P91 (recommended; see program note 1)
- one of PHYS 1P22 or 1P92 (recommended; see program note 1)
- MATH 1P01 and 1P02
- one Humanities context credit
- one Social Science context credit
Year 2
- CHEM 2P12, 2P20, 2P21, 2P32, 2P42 and 2P63
- one of PHYS 2P20, 2P31, 2P50, 2P51
- one-half COSC or MATH credit (see program note 3)
- one elective credit (see program note 2)
Year 3
- CHEM 3P40 and 3P41
- two credits from CHEM 3P20, 3P21, 3P31, 3P32, 3P51, 3P53
- one of PHYS 2P20, 2P31, 2P50, 2P51 (not taken in year 2)
- one and one-half elective credits (CHEM 3P60 recommended; see program notes 2 and 5)
Year 4
- one credit from CHEM 3P20, 3P21, 3P31, 3P32, 3P40, 3P51, 3P53 (not taken in year 3)
- three CHEM credits numbered 3(alpha)90 or above
- one elective credit (CHEM 3P60 and either CHEM 3P62 or 3P63 recommended)
 
Pass Program Go to top of document
Satisfactory completion of the first three years of the Honours program entitles a student to apply for a Pass degree.  
Biochemistry Go to top of document
Consult the Biochemistry calendar entry for a listing of courses and program requirements.  
Biotechnology Go to top of document
Consult the Biotechnology calendar entry for a listing of courses and program requirements.  
Concurrent BSc/BEd Go to top of document
The Department of Chemistry and the Faculty of Education co-operate in offering two Concurrent BSc (Honours)/BEd programs and a BSc (Pass)/BEd program. The Chemistry BSc (Honours)/BEd programs combines the BA Honours program or BA Integrated Studies Honours program with the teacher education program for students interested in teaching at the Intermediate/Senior level (grades 7-12) and at the Junior/Intermediate level (grades 4-10). The BSc Integrated (Pass)/BEd combines the BSc Integrated Pass program with the teacher education program for students interested in teaching at the Junior/Intermediate level (grades 4-10). Refer to the Education - Concurrent BSc (Honours)/BEd (Intermediate/Senior), Education - Concurrent BSc Integrated Studies (Honours)/BEd (Junior/Intermediate) or Education - Concurrent BSc Integrated Studies (Pass)/BEd (Junior/Intermediate) program listings for further information.  
Combined Major Programs Go to top of document
Combined Honours and Pass programs can be taken in Chemistry/Biology, Chemistry/Computer Science (Honours only), Chemistry/Earth Sciences and Chemistry/Environment. In most of the combined major programs a research project must be successfully completed and a thesis written as part of the requirements for an Honours degree.  
Chemistry and Mathematics Go to top of document
Honours Year 1
- CHEM 1F92 (see program note 6)
- MATH 1P01, 1P02, 1P12 and 1P40
- PHYS 1P21 or 1P91 (recommended; see program note 1)
- one of PHYS 1P22 or 1P92 (recommended; see program note 1)
- one Humanities context credit or Social Science context credit
Year 2
- CHEM 2P12 or 2P63
- CHEM 2P20, 2P32 and 2P42
- MATH 2P12
- one credit from MATH 2F05, 2P03 and 2P08
- one of PHYS 2P20, 2P31, 2P50, 2P51
- the Humanities context credit or Social Science context credit not taken in year 1
Year 3
- CHEM 3P40 or 3P41
- CHEM 3P51 and 3P53
- MATH 2F40, 2P81, 2P82, 3P08 and 3P09
- one-half CHEM credit numbered 2(alpha)90 or above
Year 4
- CHEM 4F90 and 4F91
- CHEM 3P20 and 3P21, or CHEM 3P31 and 3P32
- one credit from MATH 2P12 and 3P60, 3P08 and 3P09 (not taken in year 3)
- one CHEM or MATH credit numbered 2(alpha)90 or above
Pass Satisfactory completion of the first three years of the Honours program entitles a student to apply for a Pass degree.
 
Chemistry and Physics Go to top of document
Honours Year 1
- CHEM 1F92 (see program note 6)
- PHYS 1P21 or 1P91 (recommended; see program note 1)
- one of PHYS 1P22 or 1P92 (recommended; see program note 1)
- MATH 1P01 and 1P02
- one Humanities context credit
- one Social Science context credit
Year 2
- CHEM 2P12, 2P20, 2P32 and 2P42
- PHYS 2P20, 2P31, 2P50 and 2P51
- MATH 2F05
Year 3
- CHEM 3P51
- PHYS 3P35 and 3P36
- MATH 3P08 and 3P09
- one and one-half credits from CHEM 3P20, 3P21, 3P31, 3P32, 3P40, 3P41, 3P53
- one elective credit
Year 4
- CHEM 4F90 and 4F91 or PHYS 4F90 and 4F91
- one of CHEM 3P20, 3P21, 3P31, 3P32, 3P40, 3P41, 3P53
- one CHEM or PHYS credit numbered 2(alpha)90 or above
- one of PHYS 3P20, 4P61, 4P70
- one elective credit (see program note 7)
Pass Satisfactory completion of the first three years of the Honours program entitles a student to apply for a Pass degree.
 
Brock-Mohawk College Articulation Agreement Go to top of document
This agreement allows Brock to admit Mohawk graduates who have a minimum 78 percent overall average in the Chemical Engineering Technology Program to the Honours BSc program in Chemistry. Students automatically receive 6.5 credits towards the Honours BSc program in Chemistry.  
Minor in Chemistry Go to top of document
Students in other disciplines may obtain a minor in chemistry within their degree program by completing the following courses with a minimum 60 percent average:
- CHEM 1F92
- two CHEM credits numbered 2(alpha)00 or above
- two CHEM credits numbered 3(alpha)00 or above
 
Master of Science (MSc) Program Go to top of document
Candidates with either an Honours or a (Pass) BA or a BSc degree in Chemistry, or equivalent, may apply to the Director of the Graduate Studies Office for entry into this program. Candidates holding a Pass degree will be required to take a qualifying year, similar to year 4 of the Honours program, before formally enrolling for the MSc degree. Candidates may be required to write Graduate Record Aptitude and Advanced Chemistry Examinations. Candidates with an Honours degree, or who have completed a qualifying year, require a minimum of one year of full-time study. The department offers a wide range of courses and research opportunities in analytical, inorganic, organic, physical and theoretical chemistry. For further information about the MSc program see the Graduate Calendar and the department's Graduate Studies brochure.  
Course Descriptions Go to top of document
Note that not all courses are offered in every session. Refer to the applicable term timetable for details. # Indicates a cross listed course * Indicates a primary offering of a cross listed course  
Prerequisites and Restrictions Go to top of document
Students must check to ensure that prerequisites are met. Students may be deregistered, at the request of the instructor, from any course for which prerequisites and/or restrictions have not been met. CHEM 1F92 Chemical Principles and Properties A chemical approach to describing the natural world. Molecular structure, shapes, and behaviour of molecules, with emphasis on organic compounds. Bonding and intermolecular interactions; the states of matter; solutions and their properties. Thermochemistry, entropy, free energy, chemical equilibrium, and reaction rates. Labs emphasize chemical syntheses, stoichiometry, and modern analytical techniques. Lectures, 3 hours per week; plus a minimum of six 3-hour labs per term. Prerequisite: a minimum 70 percent grade in OAC or Grade 12U chemistry (or equivalent course), CHEM 1P00, or permission of the Department. CHEM 1P00 Introductory Chemistry Fundamental principles of chemistry. Topics include atomic structure and the periodic table, names and formulas of chemical compounds, principles of chemical bonding, types of chemical reactions, and basic chemical calculations. Tutorials emphasize the development and practice of problem solving skills. Lectures, 3 hours per week; lab, tutorial and problems solving session, 3 hours per week. Note: not open to students with 70 percent or greater in OAC or Grade 12U chemistry (or equivalent course). CHEM 1P00 is designed to assist those with insufficient background in chemistry to succeed in CHEM 1F92. Students with less than 70 percent in OAC or Grade 12U chemistry, or who have not taken an advanced high school chemistry course are allowed take CHEM 1F92 instead of CHEM 1P00 by permission of the Department if they pass a written test of basic chemistry knowledge, to be administered before classes begin. CHEM 1P90 Chemical Principles and Properties General chemistry, stoichiometry, inorganic and organic structures and reactions. Laboratory work includes chemical purification and analysis. Lectures, 3 hours per week; plus a minimum of six 3-hour labs. Restriction: open to CAST majors. Completion of this course will replace previous assigned grade in CHEM 1P80. CHEM 2P12 Introduction to Modern Physical Chemistry Phase equilibrium; gas phase kinetics; electronic structure of atoms and molecules; interaction of light with matter. Lectures, 3 hours per week; tutorial, 1 hour per week; plus a minimum of six 3-hour labs. Prerequisites: CHEM 1F92; MATH 1P01 and 1P02 (preferred), or MATH 1P97. CHEM 2P20 Principles of Organic Chemistry An introduction to the principles and techniques of organic chemistry; correlation of reactions and physical properties of organic compounds with structure and energetic concepts. Laboratory work includes organic preparations and techniques. Lectures, lab, 6 hours per week. Prerequisite: CHEM 1F92. CHEM 2P21 Principles of Bio-organic Chemistry Organic chemistry of selected groups of natural products; their biological origin and significance. Introduction to applications of spectroscopy in organic chemistry and biochemistry. Laboratory work includes organic syntheses and characterization and organic analysis. Lectures, lab, 6 hours per week. Prerequisite: CHEM 2P20. CHEM 2P32 Principles of Inorganic Chemistry A survey of the periodic table stressing periodicity of chemical behaviour. Chemistry and reactions in aqueous solutions; structure and bonding in simple compounds; applications to biological and environmental processes. Lectures, 3 hours per week; plus a minimum of six 3-hour labs. Prerequisite: CHEM 1F92. CHEM 2P42 Introduction to Analytical Chemistry Introduction to separation methods such as chromatography, solvent extraction and precipitation; use of buffers for pH-control; statistical treatment of analytical data including normal distributions, significance testing and linear regression. Lectures, lab, 6 hours per week. Prerequisite: CHEM 1F92. *CHEM 2P63 Introduction to Biophysical Chemistry (also offered as BTEC 2P63) Physical chemistry as applied to biological sciences. Introductory thermodynamics, kinetics, equilibria, and transport phenomena as applied to proteins, biological membranes and other biological systems. Laboratory work includes kinetic measurements, equilibrium constant measurements and protein purification and characterization. Lectures, lab, 6 hours per week. Prerequisites: CHEM 1F92; MATH 1P01 and 1P02 (preferred), or MATH 1P97. CHEM 2P98 Undergraduate Research Undergraduate research project carried out either in the department under the supervision of a faculty member or as an employee in a chemical industry or other suitable laboratory. Restriction: open to CHEM (single or combined) majors and permission of the Department. Note: if both CHEM 2P98 and CHEM 3P98 are taken, only one of these may be based on work done in the department. CHEM 3P20 Structure and Reactivity of Organic Molecules Basic stereochemical principles. Methods for functional group manipulation including oxidation, reduction and the use of protecting groups in organic chemistry. General methods for carbon-carbon bond formation emphasising three dimensional structure and mechanism. Modern methods of asymmetric synthesis. Laboratory work includes selected experiments in synthetic organic chemistry and the handling of air and water sensitive reagents. Lectures, lab, 6 hours per week. Prerequisite: CHEM 2P20 or permission of the Department. Note: CHEM 3P40 recommended. May be taken concurrently. CHEM 3P21 Organic Reactions The chemistry of acyclic, cyclic and heterocyclic compounds, reactive intermediates, design of organic synthesis, molecular rearrangements, free radical chemistry; introduction to organic photochemistry and electrochemistry. Lectures, lab, 6 hours per week. Prerequisite: CHEM 3P20. CHEM 3P31 Transition Metal Chemistry Systematic inorganic and organometallic chemistry of the transition elements, with emphasis on structure, bonding and reactivity in inorganic and organometallic compounds. Selected experiments in inorganic and organometallic synthesis; use of modern structural methods for determination of composition, structure and bonding. Lectures, lab, 6 hours per week. Prerequisite: CHEM 2P32. Note: CHEM 3P40 recommended. May be taken concurrently. CHEM 3P32 Main Group Inorganic Chemistry Continuation of CHEM 3P31 emphasizing the main group elements. Lectures, lab, 6 hours per week. Prerequisite: CHEM 3P31. Completion of this course will replace previous assigned grade in CHEM 3P30. CHEM 3P40 Spectroscopic Techniques for Structure Elucidation Use of instrumental methods for the determination of structures of molecules. Techniques will include mass spectroscopy, nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, dispersive and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, visible and UV spectroscopy, computerized data manipulation. Molecular modelling software may be included for three-dimensional visualization of complex molecules. Lectures, tutorial, 6 hours per week. Restriction: students must have a minimum of 9.0 overall credits. Prerequisite: CHEM 2P20. CHEM 3P41 Instrumental Methods for Quantitative Analysis Use of instrumental methods for quantitative determination of elements and molecular species. Techniques include chromatography, atomic spectrometry, X-ray fluorescence spec-trometry, nuclear emission and neutron-activation analysis, introduction to electroanalytical techniques. Emphasis on sample preparation and cleanup and aspects of quality assurance/quality control. Lectures, lab, 6 hours per week. Restriction: students must have a minimum of 9.0 overall credits. Prerequisite: CHEM 2P42. CHEM 3P51 Quantum Chemistry Schrodinger equation, solution of the harmonic oscillator problem, hydrogen atom, angular momentum theory, variational method with applications to atomic and molecular systems, molecular orbital theory and simple group theory. Introduction to FORTRAN 77. Lectures, 3 hours per week; lab, 2 hours per week; tutorial, 1 hour per week. Prerequisite: CHEM 2P12 or 2P63. CHEM 3P53 Atomic and Molecular Structure and Spectroscopy Group theory and theory of electro-magnetic radiation and spectroscopic transitions. Rotational and vibrational spectroscopy (Microwave, IR, Raman); atomic and molecular electronic spectroscopy (UV/Visible); magnetic resonance (NMR, EPR); X-ray crystallography. Lectures, lab, 6 hours per week. Prerequisite: CHEM 3P51. CHEM 3P60 Industrial Chemistry Principles and practice of industrial chemistry. A survey of the chemical industry, pollution control, plant design, corrosion and similar topics. Selected industrial processes will be discussed in detail. Tours of chemical plants and industrial laboratories. Lectures, 3 hours per week; seminars and plant tours, 3 hours per week. Prerequisite: one credit from CHEM 2P12, 2P20, 2P32, 2P42, 2P63. *CHEM 3P62 Bio-organic Chemistry (also offered as BTEC 3P62) Biosynthesis of the natural products of secondary metabolism. Introduction to the use of enzymes and other biological reagents in organic synthesis. Lectures, lab, 6 hours per week. Prerequisite: CHEM 2P21. *CHEM 3P63 Protein and Nucleic Acid Chemistry (also offered as BTEC 3P63) Structure and chemistry of proteins and nucleic acids. Selected aspects of transcription, translation, protein folding, post-translational modification, targeting, synthesis and sequencing, and detection techniques. Lectures, lab, 6 hours per week. Prerequisite: CHEM 2P21. CHEM 3P98 Undergraduate Research Undergraduate research project carried out either in the department under the supervision of a faculty member or as an employee in a chemical industry or other suitable laboratory. Restriction: open to CHEM (single or combined) majors with 9.0 overall credits and permission of the Department. Note: if both CHEM 2P98 and CHEM 3P98 are taken, only one of these may be based on work done in the department. CHEM 4F90 Research Project Experimental or theoretical research to be carried out under faculty supervision. Restriction: open to CHEM (single or combined) and BCHM majors with approval to year 4 (honours) and permission of the Chair. Prerequisite: CHEM 3P40 or 3P41. Co-requisite: CHEM 4F91. CHEM 4F91 Thesis The thesis incorporates the results of the research in CHEM 4F90 and forms the basis for a seminar to be presented by the student. Restriction: open to CHEM (single or combined) and BCHM majors with approval to year 4 (honours) and permission of the Chair. Prerequisite: CHEM 3P40 or 3P41. Co-requisite: CHEM 4F90. CHEM 4P01 Special Topics Tutorials, seminars, special projects or directed readings in an area of chemistry. Lectures/ seminar/ tutorial, 3 hours per week. Restriction: open to CHEM (single or combined) majors with a minimum of 14.0 overall credits and permission of the Chair. CHEM 4P14 Statistical Thermodynamics Systems of independent particles, chemical equilibrium, partition functions for atoms and molecules, nuclear spin statistics, fluctuations, thermodynamic properties of crystals, real gases, metals. Lectures, seminar, 3 hours per week. Prerequisite: CHEM 3P51. Co-requisite: CHEM 3P53. CHEM 4P17 Biophysical Photochemistry Principles of light induced processes such as electron, energy and signal transfer and their role in biological systems. Marcus theory, Dexter and Foerster mechanisms of energy transfer. The optical and magnetic resonance spectroscopy of excited states. Lectures, 3 hours per week. Prerequisite: CHEM 3P40, 3P53 or permission of the instructor. *CHEM 4P18 Computational Chemistry: Applications in Biotechnology (also offered as BTEC 4P18) Structure-based drug design, molecular modelling, conformational search techniques, secondary and tertiary protein structure prediction, quantitative structure activity relationships and bioinformatics. Lectures, 3 hours per week. Restriction: students must have a minimum of 13.5 overall credits. Prerequisite: CHEM 2P12 or 2P63. CHEM 4P21 Organic Reactions and Synthesis The disconnection approach to organic synthesis. Problems of chemo-, regio- and stereo-selectivity. Appreciation of elaborate syntheses. Synthetic organic chemistry topics from the recent literature. Lectures, seminar, 3 hours per week. Prerequisite: CHEM 3P21. CHEM 4P22 Organic Reactions and Mechanisms Topics include conformational analysis, introduction to transition state theory and the description of stereo and electronic control in organic reactions. Pertinent applications will be taken from the recent literature. Lectures, seminar, 3 hours per week. Prerequisite: CHEM 3P21. CHEM 4P23 Organometallics in Organic Synthesis Use of organometallic reagents for organic transformations. Metalation and trans-metalation using organolithium, magnesium, cerium and zinc reagents; stable precursors and reactive intermediates in transition metal catalyzed organic reactions employing palladium, nickel, ruthenium, and other metals. Topics from recent literature involving applications to organic synthesis, emphasizing stereoselectivity. Lectures, seminar, 3 hours per week. Prerequisite: CHEM 3P21. *CHEM 4P27 Enzyme and Co-enzyme Mechanisms (also offered as BTEC 4P27) Hydrolytic and other processes catalyzed by enzymes lacking non-protein prosthetic groups; transferase reactions involving biotin, pyridoxal phosphate, thiamine pyrophosphate, folic acid and cobalamin; oxidation mechanisms involving pyridine nucleotides, flavoenzymes, hydroperoxidases and oxgenases. Lectures, seminar, 3 hours per week. Prerequisites: CHEM 2P21, BCHM 3P01and 3P02. CHEM 4P32 Bio-inorganic Chemistry Principles governing selection, uptake, storage, transport, and role of metal ions in biological processes. Topics include electron-transfer systems, substrate binding and activation by nonredox enzymes, metal-containing drugs, and biomineralization. Lectures, seminar, 3 hours per week. Restriction: students must have a minimum of 12.0 overall credits. Prerequisites: CHEM 2P21 and 2P32. CHEM 4P40 Scientific Instrumentation Review of the use of electronic components and circuits for measurements and control; analog and digital measurements; instrument optics. Application to spectroscopic, electrochemical and other scientific instrumentation used for analysis, measurement or control. Lectures, 3 hours per week. Prerequisite: CHEM 3P40, 3P41 or permission of the instructor. CHEM 4P41 Enviro-Analytical Chemistry Chemical speciation studied by a variety of modern analytical techniques. Transport and fate of various compounds and elements in the environment. Lectures, seminar, 3 hours per week. Prerequisite: CHEM 3P41. CHEM 4P47 Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) Spectroscopy Applications of high-resolution NMR spectroscopy to chemical systems. Theory of chemical shifts, coupling constants and relaxation times; instrumentation, including pulse and Fourier transform techniques; structure determination by NMR; two-dimensional NMR; chemical exchange effects. Lectures, 3 hours per week. Prerequisite: CHEM 3P40 or permission of the instructor. CHEM 4P48 Mass Spectroscopy The theory and practice of modern mass spectroscopy applied to organic, inorganic and organometallic systems; systematic interpretation of organic mass spectra; high resolution mass spectra; GC/MS; HPLC/MS; new ionization methods; metastable ions; computerized mass spectrometry. Lectures, 3 hours per week. Prerequisite: CHEM 3P40 or permission of the instructor. *CHEM 4P67 Biophysical Techniques (also offered as BCHM 4P67 and BTEC 4P67) Modern instrumental methods of biotechnology emphasizing understanding theory. Development of newer technologies which utilize biological components. Topics include optical, X-ray and NMR techniques, separation techniques, hybridization assays, immunoassays, biosensors and mass spectral techniques; membrane chemistry. Lectures, seminar, 3 hours per week. Prerequisites: CHEM 2P21 and 2P63 or permission of the instructor. *CHEM 4P68 Biotransformations (also offered as BTEC 4P68) The organic reactions carried out by isolated enzymes, fungal cultures and bacteria. The production of pharmaceutical, agricultural and industrial chemicals by biological processes. Lectures, 3 hours per week. Prerequisite: one of CHEM 3P20, 3P62, 3P63 or permission of the instructor. CHEM 4P92 Library Research and Seminar Detailed study of the scientific literature under faculty supervision. Restriction: open to students in the BSc with a Major in Chemistry program with a minimum of 15.0 overall credits or permission of the Department. Note: the results of the study will be written up in a major essay and presented as a formal seminar.  
Co-op Courses Go to top of document
CHEM 0N01 Work Placement I First co-op work placement (4 months) with an approved employer. Restriction: open to CHEM Co-op students. CHEM 0N02 Work Placement II Second co-op work placement (4 months) with an approved employer. Restriction: open to CHEM Co-op students. CHEM 0N03 Work Placement III Third co-op work placement (4 months) with an approved employer. Restriction: open to CHEM Co-op students. CHEM 0N04 Work Placement IV Optional Co-op work placement (4 months) with an approved employer. Restriction: open to CHEM Co-op students. CHEM 0N05 Work Placement V Optional Co-op work placement (4 months) with an approved employer. Restriction: open to CHEM Co-op students.  
SCIENCE Go to top of document
SCIE 1F30 Science and Society For non-science majors, basic questions and problems in understanding the nature of science and technology and their impact on contemporary society. Some questions addressed: how are scientific theories formulated? What is pollution? What is the relation of science to ethics and public policy? Lectures, 3 hours per week; seminar, 1 hour, alternate weeks. Note: co-ordinated through the Department of Chemistry. SCIE 0N90 Co-op Training and Development Framework for the development of learning objectives for individual work terms, for students in the co-op programs in the Faculty of Mathematics and Science. Includes orientation to the co-op experience, goal setting, career planning, resume preparation and interview skills preparation. Lectures, presentations, site visits, 2 hours per week. Restriction: open to Science Co-op students. Note: see Director of Co-op Programs Office.  
Last updated: September 30, 2004 @ 10:54AM