Webinars/Forums

  • Interview with Cullum Brownbridge – Unveiling Esports Webinar

    We sat down (virtually) with Ph.D. student Cullum Brownbridge to chat about the Esports Webinar, “Unveiling Esports: A panel discussion on the direction and growth of a billion-dollar industry” that will be held on November 17th. Cullum will be moderating this exciting webinar and asking questions from the audience to facilitate a great conversation.

    In our interview, we had a chance to speak with Cullum about his connection to Esports as well as what participants will gain from attending the webinar.

    What is your connection to Esports & what excites you about it?

    Outside of having Esports as my Ph.D. main topic and a couple of other research topics within Esports, it’s mostly as a fan. I think is most students and faculty in the sports management department research sports management because they enjoy the sports themselves. When I was in my first year of undergrad at McMaster University, back in 2012, I began watching live Esports events, namely the League of Legends World Championships. There was a huge crowd and I remember there was a fan using a vuvuzela, which was popular during the 2010 FIFA World Cup. So, it was very bizarre to me at first. Since then, I’ve seen just how much the scene has grown and how more people are a part of it. In the beginning, older people might have thought “oh, you know you’re watching somebody else play video games it seems like a waste of time”, but now they see the value in it too.

    It excites me in the sense that it’s a growing industry. It’s another space for people to connect, to share, to play and to work together. It is exciting to see that people are seeing video games as a way to make connections with other people through teamwork and clubs. It’s a relatively new field and jumping into it now allows me to put my foot in the door and shape the way that literature unfolds itself around it over the next few years.

    Why should people attend this webinar?

    For students specifically, it’s a great opportunity to get a behind the scenes look at the industry. I find that a lot of people I talk to have played video games but aren’t familiar with the competitive video gaming scene. I think people are curious as first of all, how did Esports get so popular? Why is it so popular? Is it going to be a main competitor to traditional sports or other forms of entertainment?

    There is an opportunity for those who might be interested in pursuing a career in sport management. Anything they would take away and apply for the sport management field can be applied to Esports. This industry is going to continue to grow, and if students can get their foot into the door now it might benefit them a lot in the future. Especially if Esports continues to grow, and I don’t see any reason why it would stop growing.

    What will the webinar look like to the average participant?

    I think they’re going to listen to some great commentary from 3 professionals in the industry who can give them the insight that they’re looking for in terms of the direction of Esports. We’ll look into its growth, what it’s going to look like in Canada over the next five years, what it’s going to look like at the grassroots level, the collegiate level and even the professional level.

    There are three experts who work closely with teams in Esports-based organizations who can give their expertise and can share their life experiences. That will connect to the average viewer so if they’re thinking about pursuing a career in Esports or even elsewhere, they will take away lessons that will be a great benefit.

    If you are interested in attending this exciting webinar please register here!

    Categories: Blog, Webinars/Forums

  • Interview with Peter Donnelly – Athletes First: The Promotion of Safe Sport in Canada

    We sat down (virtually) with Dr. Peter Donnelly, from the Faculty of Kinesiology and Physical Education at the University of Toronto, to chat about his participation in the forum, “Athletes First: The Promotion of Safe Sport in Canada,” that will be held on June 16, 17, and 18 on Microsoft Teams. Dr. Donnelly will be speaking on the Governance panel on the second day of the event.

    In our interview, we had a chance to speak with Dr. Donnelly about what safe sport means to him, as well as what attendees will gain from attending the virtual forum.

    What does Safe Sport mean to you?

    Safe Sport is increasingly coming to be used as the collective term used to refer to sport where athletes are not subject to physical, psychological or sexual abuse, and where they are not bullied or neglected. To me, it means bringing humanity back into sport — building a sport culture where athletes and sport leaders are fellow human beings, respecting each other’s human rights, and where adults in charge of children’s sport acknowledge and take seriously their duty of care for those children.

    How are you involved in Safe Sport?

    A colleague at Queen’s University, Hart Cantelon, used the term “child labour in sport” in 1981 and it stuck with me. I began to hear more and more stories about children as athletic labourers and about child abuse in sport. In about 1987 I began to study this seriously, interviewing retired high performance athletes about their past experiences as child and adolescent athletes. I called the study, “the good, the bad, and the ugly” so you can imagine the kind of things that I was hearing in the interviews. Since that time, I have been seeking various ways to try to improve the experiences of children in sport.

    Why should someone attend this forum?

    Anyone interested in helping to change sport, especially high performance sport, from a culture of abuse to a culture of respect, might be interested in this forum.

    Categories: Blog, Webinars/Forums

  • Interview with Isabelle Cayer, Peter Niedre, and Kasey Liboiron – Athletes First: The Promotion of Safe Sport in Canada

    We sat down (virtually) with Isabelle Cayer and Peter Niedre, from the Coaching Association of Canada, and Kasey Liboiron, from the Canadian Centre for Ethics in Sport, to chat about their participation in the forum, “Athletes First: The Promotion of Safe Sport in Canada,” that will be held on June 16, 17, and 18 on Microsoft Teams. Isabelle, Peter, and Kasey will be speaking on the Coach Education panel on the third day of the event.

    In our interview, we had a chance to speak with Isabelle, Peter, and Kasey about what safe sport means to them, as well as what attendees will gain from attending the virtual forum.

    What does Safe Sport mean to you?

    Isabelle and Peter: Sport is fun and has many physical, mental, emotional and social benefits and contributes to the health of a nation. Sport should inherently be safe, where parents/guardians feel confident enrolling their children, and athletes through the system feel welcomed to a positive environment. When you look up the definition of safe it is “protected from or not exposed to danger or risk; not likely to be harmed or lost.” To us it means a place you go or a thing you do where you can show up as your authentic self and participate in physical activity, games, or competition and achieve your goals. Healthy communications and trusting relationships are key to safe sport.

    Kasey: Safe sport should be a baseline expectation for participants. It should be the foundation on which a values-based approach to sport is applied in order to maximize the benefits of sport on participants and community.

    How are you involved in Safe Sport?

    Isabelle and Peter: As the Director of Sport Safety and the Director of Education Partnerships at the Coaching Association of Canada, our roles are to make sport safe for everyone through building trust and support in the system. The primary enabler of social change is through education. We do this through our events, platforms and partnerships via training, coach education, coach and partner products and services, connecting the community and the professionalization of coaching.

    Kasey: For more than a decade, I have been advocating for sport that is fair, safe and open, as an employee of the Canadian Centre for Ethics in sport. The hope is to make sport better for more people by inspiring and supporting by inspiring and supporting Canadians to apply a values-based approach to sport and recreation.

    Why should someone attend this forum?

    Isabelle and Peter: It’s important for all participants, leaders and experts in sport to come together to listen, learn, lead, and take action. We are all accountable in making sport safe for everyone, and this forum is a great opportunity to discuss safe sport.

    Kasey: Safe sport often focuses on what not to do – attend this forum to learn how to engage your stakeholders in developing a culture of safety in order to maximize the sport experience for participants.

    Categories: Blog, Webinars/Forums

  • Interview with Bruce Kidd – Athletes First: The Promotion of Safe Sport in Canada

    We sat down (virtually) with Dr. Bruce Kidd, from the Faculty of Kinesiology and Physical Education at the University of Toronto, to chat about his participation in the forum, “Athletes First: The Promotion of Safe Sport in Canada,” that will be held on June 16, 17, and 18 on Microsoft Teams. Dr. Kidd will be speaking on the Governance panel on the second day of the event.

    In our interview, we had a chance to speak with Dr. Kidd about what safe sport means to him, as well as what attendees will gain from attending the virtual forum.

    What does Safe Sport mean to you?

    Capitalized, I would say Safe Sport is the long campaign to eradicate abusive behaviour and maltreatment from Canadian sport, and create a culture of inclusive, educationally focused, enjoyable sports, and to that end, create a federally-funded pan-Canadian institution to provide leadership to that campaign and root out the abusers. Uncapitalized, safe sport requires a complex list of conditions, summarized in the attached a two-slide deck derived from a set of literature reviews Peter [Donnelly] and I coordinated in 2008.

    How are you involved in Safe Sport?

    I’ve been an advocate for both as long as I can remember.

    Why should someone attend this forum?

    To hear and interact with leading researchers and advocates on the battle for the future of Canadian sport, and to decide for themselves ‘whose side am I on?

    Categories: Blog, Webinars/Forums

  • Interview with Erin Willson – Athletes First: The Promotion of Safe Sport in Canada

    We sat down (virtually) with Erin Willson, former Olympian and current co-chair of the Safe Sport committee at AthletesCAN, to chat about her participation in the forum, “Athletes First: The Promotion of Safe Sport in Canada,” that will be held on June 16, 17, and 18 on Microsoft Teams. Willson will be speaking on the Athletes’ Voices panel, along with Allison Forsyth, on the first day of the event.

    In our interview, we had a chance to speak with Willson about what safe sport means to her, as well as what attendees will gain from attending the virtual forum.

    What does Safe Sport mean to you?

    For me, Safe Sport means creating an environment where athletes can reach their highest potential without sacrificing their health and well-being. It means creating an environment where all participants (coaches, athletes, sport staff) feel safe, comfortable, confident and bring their full selves to do what they love.

    How are you involved in Safe Sport?

    I am a PhD candidate at the University of Toronto studying abuse in sport. I have spent the past 4 years in graduate school learning about all types of abuse (physical, emotional, sexual, neglect), and also learning how to be an advocate for athletes on these issues in the Canadian sport system.

    Why should someone attend this forum?

    There has been a growing awareness of the issues that athletes have faced in sport but there is less education and discussion about how to fix these issues and protect all sport stakeholders. I think this forum is an amazing opportunity to have an open discussion on how we as the sport community can move forward and create a safer sport environment.

    Categories: Webinars/Forums

  • Interview with Margot Page & Willy Manigat / Kascius Small-Martin & Daniel Caldwell – Planning and Building Through Challenging Circumstances

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    We sat down (virtually) with Margot Page, Head Coach of Brock Women’s Hockey, and Willy Manigat, Head Coach of Brock Men’s Basketball, to chat about their webinar, “Planning and Building Through Challenging Circumstances,” that will be held on March 23 at 7 PM (EST) on Lifesize.

    In our interview, we had a chance to speak with Page and Manigat about the challenges that coaches are facing during COVID-19 and what attendees will gain from attending their virtual event.

    We also had the pleasure of hearing from two members of Brock University Men’s Basketball team, Kascius Small-Martin and Daniel Caldwell, who spoke about their experiences being athletes throughout the pandemic.

    Margot Page and Willy Manigat

    For those unaware but interested in attending the webinar, could you provide a brief description of the challenges that coaches have faced as they coach through COVID-19?

    During the COVID-19 pandemic coaches have been faced with many challenges. Some examples include inability to access gyms and fields to conduct in person training, the number cap creating separation within the team and continuity, less contact points with the athletes, less contact point for the athletes with their teammates, and difficulty holding team members accountable to the team’s usual norms and expectations.

    Why should people attend this webinar?

    Coaches should attend this webinar in order to get a perspective of the difficulties other coaches share with them regardless of the level they are currently coaching. We hope to provide some of our solutions to some of the difficulties based on the age group or level they [attendees] are working with (i.e. club coaches, volunteer coaches, university coaches, etc.).

    We also hope to provide some insight on how coaches can move forward through this pandemic as we work closer towards normalcy and a return to competition in what we hope is the near future.

    What does coaching through these challenging circumstances look like in practice?

    Due to health and safety protocols, during the pandemic our teams and programs have had to train while keeping social distancing rules. Our practices and training sessions consist mostly on the game fundamentals, our spacing concepts and a lot of skill development.

    What is the webinar going to look like for the average participant?

    The webinar will be laid out as follows: We will begin with a discussion on Coaching Struggles, then move on to Commonalities, Solutions for Practice and Culture Building, and then end with testimonials from coaches and players.

    Can I contact the speakers after the event if time restrictions don’t allow all questions from participants to be answered?

    Willy Manigat will be available to answer questions via email after the webinar if time restraints do not allow all questions to be answered.

    Kascius Small-Martin and Daniel Caldwell

    What are the most valuable transferable skills that you have learned through COVID-19?

    Daniel Caldwell: Teamwork. 

    Kascius Small-Martin: Leadership, teamwork, communication, and discipline.

    Have you felt any changes in your team culture as you train/practice/play throughout COVID-19?

    Daniel Caldwell: The team is less of a unit as we would be in this time of year having an entire season behind us by now. Instead, the lockdowns have separated us and although we take opportunities to bond together individually through forms of virtual communication, it is not the same as spending every day for the last 8 months physically together in practices, games, travel, meetings, and workouts throughout the university. Being a team going through a culture change and trying to find its culture, it is difficult to build that [culture] during the lockdowns and separation. Although the culture has not been impacted negatively, it has not had the opportunity to grow as much as it would during a regular season. 

    Kascius Small-Martin: Somewhat of a change due to distance and only being able to see each other online for the most part. 

    Think about your training/practice style as it was before COVID-19, now think of what it’s like now. Do you miss any aspects of how things used to be? If so, can you explain?

    Daniel Caldwell: Currently our practices are individual skill-development based due to social distancing and restrictions. Given basketball is a team sport, the most missed aspects of the old practices is being able to play 5-on-5 in the half-court or run up and down 5-on-5 full-court, whether that is situations and running through plays or just playing to get cardio in, the inability to simulate games is the missing aspect.

    Kascius Small-Martin: I miss every aspect of the training and practice styles before COVID-19 because training and practice isn’t the same without being in the actual facilities (i.e. Bob Davis, BSPC, the zone) or being able to scrimmage and play contact.

    What do you think coaches have done well as they coach through COVID-19?

    Daniel Caldwell: I think our coaches have done extremely well given the circumstances. They know how difficult it is for the players and we know how badly they want us to get back to normal. But the focus is on individual development and a complete year off is the perfect time to focus on the individual needs of every player on their team. [Coaches have also been] ensuring their players that the issues going on in the world are bigger than the game of basketball as people are losing their lives and [have been] reminding us that the rules and restriction on practices are there for a reason. Our coaches have set an example by not bending the rules for us which leads for us not bending the rules outside of team/practice time and doing our part in preventing the spread of the virus.

    Kascius Small-Martin: They have kept the training programs going virtually from the very start of COVID-19 and have kept everyone optimistic that we’ll be getting back to it, [we] just have to be patient, stay safe, and do our part.

    What are some ways that coaches can improve their coaching style during COVID-19?

    Daniel Caldwell: I feel like a lot of coaches at high-level basketball do not care to get to know their players on a deeper personal level from what is going on in the gym. Most coaches just care about the type of basketball player a person is and have no interest in the type of person the player is, which could result in understanding that player more and being able to get the most out of each player on their team.

    Kascius Small-Martin: They can make the game enjoyable and fun again and let us play contact and compete.

    For those interested in attending the “Planning and Building Through Challenging Circumstances” webinar, register for March 23 at 7 PM here.

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    Categories: Blog, Webinars/Forums

  • Interview with Corliss Bean, Ph.D. – Pivoting Youth Sport and Recreation Programming in the Wake of COVID-19

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    We sat down with Corliss Bean, Ph.D., Assistant Professor within the Department of Recreation and Leisure Studies, and member of the Centre for Sport Capacity. Dr. Bean will be a panelist alongside Harry Bell of Canadian Jumpstart Charities and Erin Graybiel of the YMCA of Niagara in our upcoming webinar, “Pivoting Youth Sport and Recreation Programming in the Wake of COVID-19: Recommendations and Resources,” that will be held on Wednesday November 25th, from 1:00 pm – 2:30 pm on Lifesize.

    In our interview, we talked about the challenges that youth sport and recreation programming are facing amidst COVID-19, and what the webinar has in store for attendees.

    For those unaware but interested in attending the webinar, could you provide a brief description of the challenges youth sport and recreation programming have been dealing with as we live amongst COVID-19?

    The global outbreak of COVID-19 has resulted in closure of gyms, arenas, pools, dance and fitness studios, parks and playgrounds. Many youth are therefore not able to actively participate in their regular recreation activities outside of their homes. Under such conditions, many youth tend to be less physically active, have longer screen time, and also experience poorer mental health effects in the face of isolation from normal life compared to pre-COVID-19 times. Youth-serving organizations are working to engage youth through virtual sport and recreation programming. Such online offerings can serve to increase access to programs, activities, and program staff that would otherwise be inaccessible. However, this comes with its own challenges related to access to digital technologies

    What does youth sport and recreation programming during COVID-19 truly look like in practice?

    Tune into the webinar to find out! There are a lot of creative and engaging ways to engage youth through sport and recreation programming during COVID-19 both indoors and outdoors. Both Erin and Happy will share some great tips and resources that practitioners can use and applying within their own programming.

    What is the webinar going to be like for the average participant? 

    The webinar will share three perspectives from individuals who have diverse roles and experiences in the youth sport and recreation sectors. This webinar aims to provide recommendations and resources for all stakeholders that can help with program planning, implementation, and evaluation. This webinar will include three guests who will discuss lessons learned, best practices, and supports available to the sector during a time of uncertainty.

    If I have questions will I be able to address those at the webinar?

    Yes! There will be multiple opportunities throughout the webinar ask questions.

    Can I contact the webinar speakers after the event?

    Yes, the webinar panelists will provide their email addresses and links to their websites and social media platforms in case webinar attendees want to get in touch following the webinar.

     

    For those interested in attending the webinar on November 25th from 1:00 – 2:30 pm (ET) on Lifesize, you can register by clicking here.

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    Categories: Blog, Webinars/Forums

  • Interview with Dr. Shannon Kerwin – The Same Game Model

    We recently sat down and spoke with Dr. Shannon Kerwin, an Associate Professor of Sport Management here at Brock and a member of the Centre for Sport Capacity. Dr. Kerwin is hosting our upcoming webinar, “Understanding Same Game: The Self-Guided Gender Equity Toolkit” that will be held on September 30th, from 1:00 p.m. – 2:00 p.m.

    In our interview, we had a chance to speak with Dr. Kerwin about the Same Game Model, and what the webinar has in store for those who choose to attend.

    For those unaware but interested in coming to the webinar, could you provide a short, personal description of the Same Game model?

    “Same Game is a resource for sport organizations that has been developed by Canadian Women & Sport (with support from Women and Gender Equality), pilot tested in sport clubs, and adapted based on systematic research to ensure it is effective in providing tools that will help sport managers move towards club and organization relevant opportunities for girls and women in sport; on and off the field of play.”

    Why is Same Game and this webinar important?

    “Research shows that sport organizations want to move towards equitable places for participants, coaches, officials, staff, and board members; However, sport managers lack the capacity to create sustainable change on their own. The webinar will provide an overview of Same Game to introduce the steps involved and the key pieces to engaging stakeholders organizational and club commitment in a movement towards gender equity. Same Game recognizes that change can not occur on the back of one person, and therefore collective action must be taken. The webinar will highlight these key pieces of Same Game.

    I am proud to have been involved in the evaluation and update of Same Game. Equity is an important topic for sport managers and Same Game provides a valid resource to setting the stage for effective change towards more inclusive sport contexts in Canada.”

    What does the Same Game model truly look like in practice?

    “Same Game is an online resource that is a step by step process to help facilitate initiatives towards gender equity. The steps emphasize visioning, board and stakeholder commitment, communication and evaluation of what works and what doesn’t work. The essential piece to Same Game is embedding gender equity into policy and practice; Moving beyond one person and taking collective action. Same Game provides a tested and effective platform to do so.”

    What is the webinar going to be like for the average participant?

    “The webinar will be a chance to take in information regarding Same Game from the creators (Canadian Women & Sport) and myself. Participants will also have a chance to post questions to the team of presenters, and follow-up with the presenters after the webinar for more information.”

    If I have questions will I be able to address those at the webinar?

    “There will be an opportunity to ask questions. Due to time, all questions may not be answered within the webinar space; However, follow-up will occur between the presenters and those asking questions.”

    The webinar, “Understanding Same Game: The Self-Guided Gender Equity Toolkit”, will be held on September 30th, from 1:00 p.m. – 2:00 p.m. Spots are limited, so those who are interested in attending are encouraged to reserve their spot now by clicking here.

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    Categories: Blog, Webinars/Forums