Featured research

Explore some of our recently highlighted research within the Faculty of Social Sciences.

DEPARTMENT OF PSYCHOLOGY

RESEARCHERS DEVELOP NEW TOOL FOR STUDYING CHILDREN’S FUTURE THINKING

PhD student Tessa Mazachowsky (left) and Associate Professor Caitlin Mahy (right) have worked together for several years to develop the Children’s Future Thinking Questionnaire.

Anyone studying children’s ability to think about the future can now access a research tool: an easy-to-administer and highly effective parent questionnaire. The questionnaire covers five domains that reflect a child’s ability to consider the future when making decisions. They include planning, saving, delaying gratification, prospective memory (the ability to remember to do something in the future), and episodic foresight (the ability to project oneself into future instances).

DEPARTMENT OF CHILD & YOUTH STUDIES

Professor’s book examines notions of innocence and children’s art

Assistant Professor Hannah Dyer recently published The Queer Aesthetics of Childhood: Asymmetries of Innocence and the Cultural Politics of Child Development.

According to Assistant Professor Hannah Dyer in the Department of Child and Youth Studies, a child’s picture really can be worth a thousand words. In her new book, Dyer explores the ways in which children’s artistic expressions can make space for them – and for the adults who care for them – to grapple with issues like racism, homophobia and settler colonialism that touch and shape their lives. The Queer Aesthetics of Childhood: Asymmetries of Innocence and the Cultural Politics of Child Development was recently published by Rutgers University Press.

DEPARTMENT OF POLITICAL SCIENCE

NICOLE GOODMAN RECEIVES BROCK’S CHANCELLOR’S CHAIR FOR RESEARCH EXCELLENCE

Nicole Goodman, Assistant Professor in the Department of Political Science, received the Chancellor’s Chair for Research Excellence.

Nicole Goodman is the 2019 recipient of the Chancellor’s Chair for Research Excellence, open solely to Brock University tenured and tenure-track faculty. She plans to give at least one public lecture on the topic and will write a book and/or journal articles contributing to studies on Canadian political science, public administration, public policy, local government, Indigenous issues and elections in Canada and internationally. “The major practical output of the research will be a framework to guide communities in future elections as voting becomes increasingly digital,” she says.