Featured research

Explore some of our recently highlighted research within the Faculty of Social Sciences.

DEPARTMENT OF APPLIED LINGUISTICS

Linguistics research explores effective teaching methods for ESL students

Jackie Lloyd, a master’s student in Applied Linguistics, is researching teaching methods that will help English as a second language (ESL) students learn about and apply English articles in their speech.

The master’s student in Applied Linguistics is passionate about coming up with a method that will help ESL students learn about and apply articles in their speech.To that end, Lloyd has started a study with a group of ESL students. She is giving them a series of six instructional sessions on the use of English articles and comparing which instructions are most beneficial.

DEPARTMENT OF CHILD & YOUTH STUDIES

Professor’s book examines notions of innocence and children’s art

Assistant Professor Hannah Dyer recently published The Queer Aesthetics of Childhood: Asymmetries of Innocence and the Cultural Politics of Child Development.

According to Assistant Professor Hannah Dyer in the Department of Child and Youth Studies, a child’s picture really can be worth a thousand words. In her new book, Dyer explores the ways in which children’s artistic expressions can make space for them – and for the adults who care for them – to grapple with issues like racism, homophobia and settler colonialism that touch and shape their lives. The Queer Aesthetics of Childhood: Asymmetries of Innocence and the Cultural Politics of Child Development was recently published by Rutgers University Press.

ENVIRONMENTAL SUSTAINABILITY RESEARCH CENTRE

New research shows what hinders young Canadians in the fight against climate change

New research out of Brock University finds the majority of Canadian teens are confident they can individually impact climate change, they’re just not sure how.

“Exploration of youth knowledge and perceptions of individual-level climate mitigation action” by Gary Pickering and Xavier Fazio of Brock’s Environmental Sustainability Research Centre (ESRC), Kaylee Schoen (BA ’19) of Brock’s Department of Psychology and Marta Botta of the University of the Sunshine Coast in Australia, was published earlier this year in Environmental Research Letters. The paper shows that 88 per cent of participants believe they can personally affect climate change, yet their confidence in their education about those actions was low.

DEPARTMENT OF POLITICAL SCIENCE

NICOLE GOODMAN RECEIVES BROCK’S CHANCELLOR’S CHAIR FOR RESEARCH EXCELLENCE

Nicole Goodman, Assistant Professor in the Department of Political Science, received the Chancellor’s Chair for Research Excellence.

Nicole Goodman is the 2019 recipient of the Chancellor’s Chair for Research Excellence, open solely to Brock University tenured and tenure-track faculty. She plans to give at least one public lecture on the topic and will write a book and/or journal articles contributing to studies on Canadian political science, public administration, public policy, local government, Indigenous issues and elections in Canada and internationally. “The major practical output of the research will be a framework to guide communities in future elections as voting becomes increasingly digital,” she says.

DEPARTMENT OF PSYCHOLOGY

RESEARCHERS DEVELOP NEW TOOL FOR STUDYING CHILDREN’S FUTURE THINKING

PhD student Tessa Mazachowsky (left) and Associate Professor Caitlin Mahy (right) have worked together for several years to develop the Children’s Future Thinking Questionnaire.

Anyone studying children’s ability to think about the future can now access a research tool: an easy-to-administer and highly effective parent questionnaire. The questionnaire covers five domains that reflect a child’s ability to consider the future when making decisions. They include planning, saving, delaying gratification, prospective memory (the ability to remember to do something in the future), and episodic foresight (the ability to project oneself into future instances).

DEPARTMENT OF SOCIOLOGY

Brock expert reflects on responding to policy challenges amid COVID-19 pandemic

Kate Bezanson, Associate Professor of Sociology and Associate Dean of Undergraduate Studies in Brock University’s Faculty of Social Sciences.

Within three weeks of schools closing in March, Bezanson and a team of colleagues had produced “From Stabilization to Stimulus and Beyond: A Roadmap to Social and Economic Recovery,” a policy document outlining four key areas of focus – social solidarity, care work, federal leadership, and social and built infrastructure – and providing recommendations to solve both short- and long-term challenges associated with the pandemic. The document was published April 6 and summarized in First Policy Response shortly after. Bezanson and her colleagues produced opinion pieces to reach a broader audience and were soon called on for multiple interviews with the Toronto StarCTV NewsThe Hill Timesthe National Post, and Huffington Post, among other venues.

CENTRE FOR WOMEN'S AND GENDER STUDIES

Bourgeois to talk National Inquiry next steps at Royal Society of Canada meeting

Robyn Bourgeois, Acting Vice Provost, Indigenous Engagement and Associate Professor in the Centre for Women’s and Gender Studies, will present virtually to the Royal Society of Canada about her Decolonial Reading Circle initiative on Tuesday, Nov. 24 at 11:30 a.m.

Bourgeois was invited to take part in the panel by its moderator, Qajaq Robinson, who served as one of the Inquiry’s commissioners. Bourgeois will speak about the Decolonial Reading Circle (DRC), which she is leading for the second consecutive year. The six-month long initiative for Brock and the wider community has participants read from and discuss the Inquiry’s final report. She is also hosting a second DRC with Brock’s Centre for Pedagogical Innovation to explore other readings around decolonization. This group recently welcomed acclaimed author Alicia Elliott to a discussion of her book, A Mind Spread Out on the Ground. During the Royal Society of Canada presentation, Bourgeois will also talk about how “the community-based research approach employed in the Inquiry offers a model for how to conduct good research with Indigenous communities.”