News

  • Canada Games Research Spotlight: Duncan Koerber

    Assistant Professor of Communication, Popular Culture and Film Duncan Koerber’s research focuses on the teaching of writing skills and the theory of crisis communication. In crisis communication, he is particularly interested in understanding why public crises develop in social media, and why social media crises have become so common and so damaging to organizations’ images and people’s careers. He also studies media and journalism history.

    Koerber is one of 11 Brock researchers and scholars who received funding under the 2020-21 round of the VPR Canada Games Grant program. Here, he discusses his research project titled “Social Media and Large Sporting Events: Social Media Crisis Monitoring of the Niagara 2022 Canada Games.”

    Please give a brief overview of your research project

    This project is about how crises during large sporting events are sparked or amplified by social media users on Twitter. I’m also interested in researching best practices for dealing with crises that occur on social media.

    Part One of the project, now completed, saw a Brock student produce a literature review report of previous studies on the use of social media during large sporting events. Part Two of the project will see a Brock student use public relations industry software to monitor Canada Games-related Twitter posts during the event in August. What’s uncertain is that we obviously don’t know if a social media crisis will occur during the Canada Games. But we’ll be ready, capturing all the Games-related tweets. If a crisis happens, we can use the tweets as our primary source material for analysis on many different levels.

    What do you expect will be the outcome of your research?

    This project will generate new research on social media content during one large sporting event. As well, Part One of the project, the literature review, found that very little research has been done in this specific area. Instead, researchers in different fields have been studying slightly different topics. I hope this study will bring together these streams of research and push them forward in a new direction. With the Canada Games as a central case study, the project will offer insights into social media, crisis communication and large sporting events.

    How will this contribute to knowledge, or understanding, of the Canada Summer Games? 

    This project is a case study of one Canada Games, which will provide analysis and advice for social media managers of future Canada Games. But it will also link this major Canadian sporting event to others like the FIFA World Cup and Olympic Games. Researchers and practitioners studying those events will be able to build on the analysis and advice from the Canada Games.

    How did you become interested in this research?

    For the past three years, I’ve been working on a book about social media and crisis communication. The study of social media in crisis situations is a relatively new research area. Even less research has been done on sports and social media crisis. I’m a big sports fan too, so this project brings these interests together.

    How do you plan on sharing your research? 

    The research will be disseminated in a journal article, likely in the area of communication studies or public relations.

    Categories: News

  • Film fans yell ‘action’ on a double-feature wedding

    In 2013, Teagan Chevrier met Tyrell Lisson on Facebook, where the two began chatting in a group for incoming first-year students to Brock University and noticed they had similar interests: both were film studies majors and enjoyed listening to Fall Out Boy and Bring Me the Horizon. They agreed to meet up during the second day of orientation week to wander around campus – and ended up spending the next eight hours together. “We had so much in common, it was spooky,” Chevrier, a film editor, says. “The time just flew by.”

    Within a week and a half, they were officially an item.

    At first, Lisson, a film producer, was drawn to Chevrier’s punk aesthetic. And he quickly realized her temperament perfectly complemented his. “She’s the yin to my yang,” he says. “I can get pretty wound up about things, and she’s there to ground me.” Chevrier felt like she had finally met someone she could talk to forever.

    And they’ve been talking ever since. After six years of dating, Lisson decided to propose while in Hawaii on a vacation with Chevrier’s family. On the second day of the trip, while the rest of the family was watching hockey playoffs, Lisson suggested they take a stroll on Waikiki Beach. Choppy waves crashing onto the shore kept Lisson from getting down on one knee, but he clinched the “yes” regardless.

    They chose 10/10/2020 as their wedding date because Chevrier liked the symmetry and selected The Elm Hurst Inn & Spa in her hometown of Ingersoll, Ont. as the venue because, she says, “we didn’t want to do something that was ‘modern city,’ but we also didn’t want to go full-on ‘wedding in a barn.’”

    Due to pandemic restrictions, the Elm Hurst pushed their wedding into 2021, but rather than wait, the couple opted to keep the special date they’d already picked out. They cut down their guest list from 150 to 25 and hosted an outdoor wedding in Chevrier’s parents’ backyard. Chevrier sourced vintage mismatched glassware from flea markets and thrift shops to avoid drink mix-ups and served individual picnic baskets complete with a single serving of prosecco. Her Kleinfeld dress didn’t arrive in time, so Chevrier found a vintage 1970s wedding dress on Kijiji, which her grandmother altered into a two-piece set. Lisson wore an H&M suit he already owned, and the couple exchanged last-minute $70 rings from Mejuri. Though little went as planned, Chevrier says, “it turned into a perfect day with no stress because it was so low-key.”

    The highlight of the ceremony involved handfasting, an ancient Celtic tradition in which a knot is tied around the couple’s hands to signify their intent to marry. (It also happens to be the origin of the phrase “tying the knot.”) Chevrier was drawn to the tradition because of her Scottish heritage and because she “liked the idea that if the situation isn’t perfect, you’re doing this for now with the understanding you will revisit it and make it official.”

    On Oct. 30, 2021, a little more than a year later, the couple made it official, as their original invitees descended on the Elm Hurst. Their second wedding was almost a “carbon copy” of the first, says Lisson, with the same florist and photographer – only this time things went according to plan.

    At the second wedding, they employed an innovative way for the guests to request the bride and groom kiss without clinking glasses: answering movie trivia. Chevrier, who wrote questions for each table thinking there wouldn’t be much interest, didn’t expect the competitive showdown. “Tables were fighting other tables to get the answers,” she says.

    The wedding turned into an impromptu concert when groomsmen took turns playing songs by the Band and the Proclaimers. A friend wrote the couple a song as a wedding gift and performed it for the first dance – and had it pressed onto seven-inch vinyl so they could treasure it forever.

    Now, the pair can cherish double the nuptial memories. “We’re so lucky we got to have two weddings,” Lisson says. “People continually make the joke, When are you going to have a third?”

    By Isabel B. Slone, Special to the Toronto Star
    Feb. 27, 2022

    CPCF alumni stories
    Categories: News

  • Congratulations to Nick Printup

    The Department of Communication, Popular Culture and Film congratulates Nick Printup, one of four winners of the National Share Your Roots Virtual Reality Competition hosted by Uber, the Canadian Council for Aboriginal Business and ORIGIN.

    Printup, a Media and Communication Studies graduate, pitched an idea for a virtual reality video to create a cultural learning experience about the origin of Lacrosse. He was selected as a semi-finalist (1 of 15 from across Canada) at which point the competition called for people to vote for the semi-finalists online to aid the judges in making their decisions.

    Having been selected as one of four recipients, he will be awarded a video production of I approximately $35,000 to turn his idea into a (virtual) reality. Printup hopes to begin filming by the end of the summer within the Niagara Region.

    Congratulations Nick!

    Read Nick’s bio here.

    Categories: News

  • 2020 Dobson Case Competition

    Start putting your teams together!

    To learn more click here

    Categories: Events, News

  • Feb. 25: CPCF Research Forum

    Another research forum will be held on March 10. Speakers will be announced shortly.

    Categories: Events, News

  • Feb. 4 – Research Forum

    Additional research forums will be held on Feb. 25 and Mar. 10. Speakers will be announced shortly.

    Categories: Events, News

  • Postdoctoral fellow publishes piece in The Walrus

    Anna Peppard, a Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada postdoctoral fellow in Brock’s Department of Communication, Popular Culture and Film, had a piece recently published in The Walrus about themes of transformation, disguise and duality in superhero stories and how these themes relate to the LGBTQ community.

    Peppard writes:

    “In a film-and-television landscape increasingly saturated with superhero content, the CW network’s Batwoman — which debuted last fall and was renewed for a second season last week — is unique for at least two reasons: the title character, who is a lesbian, is the first openly LGBTQ superhero to headline a live action comic book adaptation; and the show’s star, Ruby Rose, who identifies as lesbian and gender fluid, is the first openly LGBTQ performer to portray a headlining superhero.

    This isn’t a case of “in name only” diversity. The lesbian identity of Batwoman, civilian name Kate Kane, is woven into the show’s narrative premise. The show is adapted from a 2006 comic book reenvisioning of the character, which made her a former star recruit at West Point academy who is forced to abandon her dreams of a military career after an anonymous tip outs her as a lesbian. This compels Kate to find another way to serve, which leads to her becoming Batwoman. In the CW show, Kate is additionally compelled by necessity: Gotham City has descended into near anarchy after the mysterious disappearance of Batman three years earlier. Yet she is more directly compelled by love; she dons the Batsuit for the first time in order to save her military-academy ex-girlfriend, Sophie, from the clutches of a supervillain.”

    Continue reading the full article here.

    Categories: News

  • Opportunity for recent grads: Ontario Internship Program

    Join a supportive, diverse and inclusive community with the Ontario Public Service (OPS) – Ontario Internship Program (OIP).

    The Ontario Internship Program offers a paid one-year internship to recent post-secondary graduates. It’s an excellent opportunity to gain experience, develop skills, and build a network in an organization that has been recognized as one of Canada’s Top Employers for Young People (2019).

    Online applications will be accepted from January 6, 2020 until 11:59 a.m. on January 22, 2020. Placements begin in July 2020.

    For more information, visit www.internship.gov.on.ca

    Informational flyers:

    Categories: News

  • Summer 2020: International Internship Opportunity

    There is an exciting international internship opportunity for CPCF students in Czech Republic. Masaryk University is offering a summer internship course worth 0.5 credits in a variety of fields relating to Media/Business Communication.

    Students will gain 200 hours of work experience in a local business in Brno (unpaid) and have the opportunity to travel within the Czech Republic and surrounding countries as well. More information about the opportunity can be found here: https://czs.muni.cz/en/student-from-abroad/summer-schools/social-sciences/communication-internship

    Internal applications are due February 1 and students can apply through Brock International’s online application: https://brocku.ca/international/mobility/summer/requirements/

    Categories: News

  • Nov. 29: CPCFSS Charity Event

    Get crafty for a great cause! Join the Communication, Popular Culture and Film Student Society (CPCFSS) this Friday in Skybar Lounge in Isaac’s for a holiday crafting charity event. All crafts will be donated to kids staying in local hospitals over the holidays and raffle proceeds will go to Crafting for a Cure (CFC).

    Categories: Events, News