Articles tagged with: Mainstage

  • The Rise and Fall of the City of Mahagonny

    WRITTEN BY: Bertolt Brecht and Kurt Weill
    DIRECTED BY: Virginia Reh
    SCENOGRAPHY BY: David Vivian

    Show dates/times: Nov. 13, 14, 20 & 21 at 7:30 p.m.
    Matinee performances: Sunday, Nov. 15 at 2 p.m., & Friday, Nov. 20 at 11:30 a.m.

    Performed in the Dramatic Arts Theatre, Marilyn I. Walker School of Fine and Performing Arts, 15 Artists’ Common, St. Catharines.

    Purchase tickets here

    Come to Mahagonny where all your dreams and nightmares come true. The Widow Begbick welcomes you to her fantasyland for grown-ups. Every day’s party day in Mahagonny. Music! Dance! Drama! Why would you ever want to leave?

    Tickets are $18 Adults; $15 Students/Seniors; $12 Groups (10+);  $5 eyeGo high school program, and are available through the FirstOntario Performing Arts Centre Box Office Centre
    at or online at boxoffice@firstontariopac.ca


    Brock University
    MEDIA RELEASE

    October 29, 2015
    Marilyn I. Walker School of Fine and Performing Arts
    905.688.5550, x4765

    The curtain rises on the first mainstage presentation of the inaugural season for the new Dramatic Arts Theatre: The Rise and Fall of the City of Mahagonny

    Brock University’s Department of Dramatic Arts presents their rendition of German playwright Bertolt Brecht and composer Kurt Weill’s renowned opera/musical, The Rise and Fall of the City of Mahagonny, to be held in the Dramatic Arts Theatre at the Marilyn I. Walker School of Fine and Performing Arts, 15 Artists’ Common, from Nov. 13 – 21, 2015.

    The title refers to the colour ‘mahogany’, Brecht’s reference to the German ‘Brown Shirts.’ This production is set in 1957 on the Gulf Coast, close to Pensacola. In parallels to the original productions, America is recovering from the McCarthy era, and the coast is threatened by an impending hurricane – in our case, Audrey.

    An opera of Epic Theatre, The Rise and Fall of the City of Mahagonny follows the lives of its denizens as they are consumed by the power of money, which wins out against all other forces that motivate us: friendship, family, morality, philosophy.

    “In the whole human race, there is no greater criminal than a man without money.” ~Brecht/Weill, The Rise and Fall of the City of Mahagonny

    Directed by Guest Artist Virginia Reh and designed by Associate Professor David Vivian, The Rise and Fall of the City of Mahagonny showcases the talents of students in the Department of Dramatic Arts undergraduate program, including the performers: Keri Bishop, Helena Ciuciura, Nikka Collison, Caroline Coon, Ben Fallis, Andrew Godin, Rob Grady, Lena Hall, Mark Harrigan, Shanza Hashmi, Cole Larson, Adrian Marchesano, Sean McClelland, Jonah McGrath, Elizabeth Pereira, Julia Scaringi, Demetri Tsioros, and with special guest alumni David MacKenzie and Steve Reistetter.

    Virginia Reh states, “The original productions were in the early 1930s and very much in Brecht’s style of theatre for the people. In recent years, Mahagonny has become popular with large opera companies. Our production aims to dial the piece back to something Brecht might actually recognize.”

    The Rise and Fall of the City of Mahagonny will run Nov. 13, 14, 20 & 21 at 7:30 p.m.; Nov. 15 at 2 p.m.; and Nov. 20 at 11:30 a.m., and will be held in the Dramatic Arts Theatre, Marilyn I. Walker School of Fine and Performing Arts, 15 Artists’ Common, St. Catharines. Tickets are $18 Adults; $15 Students/Seniors; $12 Groups (10+); $5 eyeGo high school program, and are available through the FirstOntario Performing Arts Centre Box Office at 905.688.0722, online at http://firstontariopac.ca or via email: boxoffice@firstontariopac.ca

    Such programs from the Department of Dramatic Arts (https://brocku.ca/miwsfpa/dramaticarts) are an integral part of the Marilyn I. Walker School of Fine and Performing Arts’ mandate in building connections between the community and the breadth of talent and creativity at Brock University.

    Parking is not available on-site, however, there are more than 1,000 spots available in nearby parking garages, surface lots and on city streets within a five-minute walk to our address at 15 Artists’ Common. Visit this website for a list of parking locations.

    This production contains strong language and sexual content.

    Media Day: Tuesday, November 10 at 5 p.m., held at the Dramatic Arts Theatre, 15 Artists’ Common, St. Catharines, ON.

    For more information or to set up interviews contact:
    Marie Balsom, Communications
    Marilyn I. Walker School of Fine and Performing Arts
    T: 905.688.5550 x4765
    C: 905.964.7646
    E: mbalsom@brocku.ca
    W: brocku.ca/miwsfpa/dramaticarts


    Media & Downloads:

    View the TVCogeco feature on The Rise and Fall of the City of Mahagonny below:

     

    Download a copy of the poster and the promotional card by clicking on the images below:

    Poster:
    The Rise and Fall of the City of Mahagonny - Poster

    Promo Card:
    The Rise and Fall of the City of Mahagonny - Promo Card

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    Categories: Events, Media Releases, News, Plays

  • THE BELLE’S STRATAGEM

    “Marie Antoinette” by Yuling Deng

    WRITTEN BY: Hannah Cowley
    DIRECTED BY: Gyllian Raby
    SCENOGRAPHER: Kelly Wolf

    November 13, 14, and 15, 2014 at 7:30 p.m.
    Matinee performance: November 14 at 11:30 a.m.

    Performed in the Sean O’Sullivan Theatre, Brock University

    Hannah Cowley’s most successful Town Comedy of 1783 demonstrated how to get your man and keep him in Georgian times — but once relocated in today’s Toronto, the laughing feminism lurking within the Marriage Plot is exposed in all its decadent hilarity.

    purchase tickets here

    A Study Guide is available for review, prepared by Assistant Director Nicholas Leno: download to print a copy (PDF, 3.7 MB)

    Please scan here to buy tickets and follow us on social media. keepingupwithmrsracket.com

    The Belle’s (Social Media) Stratagem
    A central character in the Department of Dramatic Arts’ autumn Mainstage production, The Belle’s Stratagem, will have an active life on social media thanks to a partnership between students in one of the department’s courses and the Mainstage production team. The goal of this partnership is extend the life of The Belle’s Stratagem both before ad after the actual run (November 13-15) and to engage audiences in critical dialogue around the show.

    Director and DART professor Gyllian Raby and assistant director Nick Leno have adapted and updated Hannah Cowley’s 18th-century comedy to be set in today’s Toronto. Through Instagram, Twitter, and YouTube, tech-savvy students in DART 3P95: Studies in Praxis I: Theatre Criticism are creating an online identity for one of the play’s central characters, Mrs. Racket. Followers of @racketlife can see photos of her favourite products, read her daily aphorisms, and watch “fan” videos posted on YouTube. Mrs. Racket’s online persona not only develops the character beyond the page and stage, but also highlights some of the production’s key themes related to consumerism, celebrity, and social class.

    The social media platforms officially launch on October 20. Each platform is interconnected through the blog www.keepingupwithmrsracket.com; the blog is also accessible via the production’s QR code, which is included in all publicity materials. Followers are encouraged to interact with Mrs. Racket across all three platforms using the hashtag #racketlife: they can repost her Instagram photos or post and tag their own, tweet with Mrs. Racket, and vlog about the production on YouTube. The possibilities for participation are endless! During the show’s run, Praxis students will be present before each performance to demonstrate this technology through an interactive lobby display.

    This partnership is part of a key component of the Theatre Criticism course, in which students immerse themselves behind-the-scenes in creative processes with local arts organizations, and write about it for the course blog, DARTcritics.com. The Belle’s (Social Media) Stratagem is an innovation this year, the first time that Theatre Criticism students have gone behind the scenes on a DART Mainstage and the first time that the learning outcomes involve a social media strategy.

    Instagram account: @racketlife
    Twitter account: @racketlife
    YouTube channel: Racketlife


    some words from our guests:

    …excellent adaptation with the references to modern Toronto and all its foibles.
    – Associate Dean, Dr. Brian Power

    By re-historicizing Hannah Cowley, [Gyllian Raby, the director] is able to liberate her message. Cowley’s hesitant feminism is sharpened in Raby’s adaption. And shifting the play’s locale from eighteenth-century London to twenty-first century Toronto, Raby adds biting commentary – much of it delivered through choruses of rap music – on the ravaging cultural and economic effects of unfettered financial capitalism, which goes well beyond Cowley’s predictable tut-tutting about the vulgar spending displays of England’s nabobs. . . . . Mixing rap music with formal eighteenth-century drama sounds depressingly like a sterile post-modern conceit. But it works wonderfully well in this instance, partly because Raby is the director of the play she adapted. She directs an exuberant student cast who seem just as much at home mincing through the formalities of a masqued ball as they do gyrating to the strains of Rick Ross, Lil’ Mama, and Salt ’n’ Pepa.
    – from a review by Professor Emeritus John Sainsbury in the online British Journal of Eighteenth-Century Studies published by the The British Society for Eighteenth-Century Studies.


    Press:

    Published on Nov 8, 2014: The Department of Dramatic Arts at Brock University presents The Belle’s Stratagem from November 13th to 15th. Katie Jones reports. See the Cogeco TV report on The Belle’s Stratagem:

     

    Published on Nov 11, 2014: From Brock TV, a look into The Belles Stratagem, opening this Thursday! Meet the cast and crew of DART’s latest production of Hannah Cowley’s The Belle’s Stratagem.

     


    Photos:

    Painting the set floor for Belles Stratagem. L-R: Nikka Collison, Caroline Coon, Andrew Von Lukawiecki, and Brian Cumberland (Production Manager)

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  • Jehanne of the Witches

    jehanne_promo_dvJEHANNE OF THE WITCHES

    by Sally Clark

    February 13-15, 2014 at 7:30 PM
    Student Matinee February 14 at 1:00 PM

    DIRECTED BY Virginia Reh
    Scenographer: David Vivian

    Assistant Director:  Casey Gillis
    Assistant Designer: James McCoy
    Dramaturg:  Brittany Stewart

    Black magic, illusion, and the suppression of Truth. Voices swirl as Joan of Arc and Gilles de Rais, the infamous Bluebeard, concoct a witches’ brew of sexuality and the use – and abuse – of power.

    The Department of Dramatic Arts of the Marilyn I. Walker School of Fine and Performing Arts is proud to present this play by Canadian playwright Sally Clark. Ms Clark was part of a wave of female playwrights in the 1980s who wrote plays about notable women from a female perspective. The play is mostly based on solid historical fact; Clark weaves her magic through unique interpretation and theatricality.


    Information:

    View our media release.

    High-School teachers should read this letter about the Matinee performance opportunity available for Jehanne of the Witches (February 2014). We’re also providing information on Secondary Education Curriculum Ties.

    NEW! An Audience Guide is available for download.

    Download the poster

    Join us on our Facebook event page

    Purchase tickets here!


    Media:

    see the preview on Cogeco TV below:

     

    see the article in the Brock News:

    david_jehanne_01-300x226
    That burning feeling: Jehanne of the Witches

     

    Media call photos:

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  • TWELFTH NIGHT, (or what you will) a comedy by William Shakespeare at the Department of Dramatic Arts

    image by Nitin Vadukul

    image by Nitin Vadukul

    TWELFTH NIGHT, (or what you will)

    a comedy by William Shakespeare

    November 7 – 9, 2013 at 7:30 PM
    Student Matinee November 08 at 11:30 AM

    DIRECTED BY Gyllian Raby
    Co-Director and Vocal Coach: Danielle Wilson
    Assistant Director and Dramaturge: Keavy Lynch

    If music be the food of love, play on!
    “Twelfth Night, (or what you will)” presented on stage at the Sean O’Sullivan Theatre

    The Department of Dramatic Arts’ rendition of Twelfth Night gives this classic Shakespearean comedy a 20th century twist, setting it in the 1950s and taking audiences to the era of soul-searching country blues. This production runs November 7, 8 and 9, 2013 at 7:30 p.m., and November 8 at 11:30 a.m., held at the Sean O’Sullivan Theatre, Brock University.

    The magical fictitious kingdom of Illyria is a modern world where boys are boys and girls are girls and subterranean passions blow apart rigid conventions. Fools, lovers, and shipwrecked souls grapple adverse fortunes and comic misunderstandings to find what truth and love might mean. To meet Shakespeare’s demand that Illyria be a land where music is “the food of love,” we present the fool musician Feste as the leader of a country blues band.

    The production is a directorial collaboration between Dramatic Arts faculty Gyllian Raby and Danielle Wilson, assisted by Keavy Lynch. Raby states, “We are performing Twelfth Night using music rooted in contemporary culture, so although this production is not a musical, music is threaded throughout the play.” Wilson adds, “The play has many of the elements common to Elizabethan romantic comedy, including the devices of mistaken identity, separated twins, and gender-crossing disguise, and its plot revolves around whether one can manage betrayal, and overcome the obstacles to truth and love.“

    Have a look at our media release (PDF).

    Let us know you’re coming by joining our Facebook Event.

    High-School teachers should read this letter about the Matinee performance opportunities available for Twefth Night (November 2013) and Jehanne of the Witches (February 2014)  (PDF)

    A Study Guide is available for review,
    prepared by Gyllian Raby and Keavy Lynch:
    download to print a copy (PDF, 2.0 MB)

    watch this preview on Cogeco TV:

    see the article in the Brock News!

    (From left): Sean Rintoul, Chris Chapman and Bri Lidstone perform in the Department of Dramatic Arts production of Twelfth Night, which opens Nov. 7 at the Sean O'Sullivan Theatre.

    (From left): Sean Rintoul, Chris Chapman and Bri Lidstone perform in the Department of Dramatic Arts production of Twelfth Night, which opens Nov. 7 at the Sean O’Sullivan Theatre.

    Announcing $5.00 Fridays!

    all holders of Brock ID cards – students, staff and faculty – are invited to take advantage of a special new price for the Matinee mainstage performance. Please present your ID card upon purchase of your ticket.
    Tickets for all performances including the $5.00 Friday Matinees are available through the  Box Office of the Centre for the Arts
    or  905.688.5550  x 3257

    For more information, please contact Marie Balsom, Co-ordinator of the School of Fine and Performing Arts, at 905-688-5550, ext. 4765; e-mail: mbalsom@brocku.ca

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    Categories: Events, Plays

  • The Blue Room

    blue_room_poster_image_220_no_border_0By David Hare, freely adapted from Arthur Schnitzler’s La Ronde

    Director: Virginia Reh
    Scenographer: David Vivian
    Lighting Design: Ken Garrett
    Assistant Director: Jessi Robinson

    February 14, 15 & 16, 2013: 7:30pm – 9:30pm
    Matinee: February 15, 2013: 1pm – 3 pm

    Directed by Professor Virginia Reh, The Blue Room is David Hare’s 1998 adaptation of Schnitzler’s Reigen (La Ronde), first produced in 1921. The plot is a “sexual daisychain”: the Girl couples with the Cab Driver, then the Cab Driver with the Au Pair, etc. Each time the new participant in one scene moves on to the next scene and so on, until in the final scene the Girl returns and encounters the Aristocrat. The play looks at casual sexual encounters as a (mostly) unsatisfactory substitute for human connection. This is a universal and timeless quest. The play is an important exploration with diverse current points-of-view: as each character has encounters with two different partners, the play explores the shifting status relationships (both social and personal). The relational dynamics of the play have interesting correspondences to explorations on social media.

    Tickets: Adults $15.00, Students/Seniors $12.00, Groups $10.00, eyeGo $5.00. H.S.T. extra.

    Theme-oriented and moderated workshops will be available. DART 3F93: Social Issues Theatre for Community Development, taught by Professor Joe Norris,  will employ Process Drama and Applied Theatre techniques to explore themes that underlie the Blue Room. Scenes will be created that delve into issue of identity, innocence, risks, thresholds, secrets, awkwardness, beliefs, mores, taboos, exploitation and power. With a participatory dimension cast and audience will enter into conversations to explore the issues further.

    Please contact us for more information.

    THE BLUE ROOM: A Primer 
    is available for review before you come to see the production

    low res 709kb
    high res 2139 kb
    print res 3690 kb


    Media:

    Interactive Arts and Science program student Patrick Gagliardi has put together a sultry trailer for the show.

    from COGECO TV, Published on Feb 8, 2013: The Department of Dramatic Arts at Brock University are hoping to spice up your Valentines Day with their new production “The Blue Room’.

     

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    In the buff with Brock’s Blue Room:
    A fun full-first-page-of-the-section article about our upcoming mainstage in the city paper – another great reason to study dramatic arts at Brock University. Come see the play and discover what its really all about.

     

    br-_brock_press_th
    See the article about the show in The Brock Press, the independent student newspaper.

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    Categories: Events, Plays

  • The Suicide – A Russian Comedy

    final_october_04_12_no-layers_web_thNovember 8-10, 2012 at 7:30 PM
    Student Matinee: November 09 at 11:30 AM

    A Russian Comedy by Nikolai Erdman
    Adapted by: Gyllian Raby and Anna MacAlpine
    Director: Gyllian Raby
    Russian Consultant: Larisa Brodsky
    Set Design: Nigel Scott
    Costume Design: Roberta Doylend
    Lighting Design: Ken Garrett
    Assistant Director: Dylan Sylvester
    Assistant Designer and Poster Design: Stephanie Baxter
    Music Director: Anna MacAlpine
    Movement: Trevor Copp, with Rachel Romanowski

    A classic comedy that satirizes the New society which was developing in Russia under Lenin’s New Economic Policy of 1924 – a program that many communists considered to be a step backwards for communism. A fast moving, unpretentious examination of hubris and lifestyle and its expression in style: physical poise, dress and drawl. An examination of conformity. The play is ultimately very homely in its definition of human happiness with the physicalized characters, balancing serious satire and comedy.

    Themes: big items in the human condition: love, ego, appetite, meaning of life and social convention.

    There is NO mature language or sexual content and the violence is “keystone cops” – this show is fine for youth.

    High-School teachers should read this letter about the Matinee performance opportunity (PDF, 247 KB)
    A Study Guide is available for review, prepared by Gyllian Raby and Anna MacAlpine.

    A copy of this special new adaptation of the script is available for download here. (PDF, 120kb)

    The Suicide, By Nicolai Erdman
    Adapted by Gyllian Raby and Anna MacAlpine
    Thanks to Larisa Brodsky.
    Royalty free with permission, 2012.
    Gyllian Raby
    Department of Dramatic Arts
    Brock University
    graby@brocku.ca


    Photos:

    Director Gyllian Raby and Set Designer Nigel Scott present the concept of the set design for this innovative new production of The Suicide, seen below:

    Production images below courtesy of Naturally in Niagara. Click the link to see more of their images from our media call.

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  • Lion in the Streets

    Written by Judith Thompson

    Directed by Danielle Wilson
    Designed by David Vivian

    Lion in the Streets is a beautiful nightmare.
    – Danielle Wilson, director

    February 16, 2012 – 7:30 pm
    February 17, 2012 – matinee 11:30 am AND 7:30 pm
    February 18, 2012 – 7:30 pm

    Adult $15 : Students/Seniors $12 : eyeGO $5 : Group Rates $10
    Buy tickets at arts.brocku.ca

    All DART Students receive ONE free ticket.

    Lion in the Streets is a play in which the obsessions of the characters erupt forth in heightened, surreal and imagistic language. The young protagonist, a Portuguese immigrant to Toronto named Isobel, is a ghost in a purgatorial condition. She deftly moves in and out of critical, extreme moments in each of the characters lives while searching for the man who killed her seventeen years prior. Twentieth century music underscores the critical moments in these characters’ lives animated with contemporary movement inspired by dance company La La La Human Steps. This unique mixture complements and elucidates surreal moments while revealing Thompson’s brilliant, sparkling humor. The production embodies our contemporary quest for faith, truth, and a ‘state of grace’ while contending with the absurdity of daily life.

    Lion in the Streets is written by award-winning Canadian Playwright Judith Thompson.  Premiered at the Tarragon Theatre in 1990 the play won the Chalmers Outstanding New Play Award in 1991. Thompson’s plays embrace subconscious elements of human experience not often seen on stage, capturing audience’s attention across the country. Canadian theatre companies regularly perform her work, such as Soulpepper’s 2011 production of White Biting Dog at the Young Center in Toronto.Lion in the Streets continues to be one of Thompson’s most known and most popular plays. High School students will be confronted with daring subject matter which could provide context and relevance to their lives. The play explores themes of repressed violence and sexuality, the search for identity and the powerful nature of love and forgiveness.  While the subject matter is dark, Thompson has crafted this exquisitely surreal play with moments of humor, hope and redemption or what she calls “moments of grace”.

    Contemporary movement will be choreographed by Gerald Trentham, Artistic Director of Toronto’s Pounds Per Square Inch Performance company. Our production will showcase 8 second to fourth year Brock students, playing a total of 29 roles, with additional assistance from students studying the areas of production, stagecraft, design and directing.

    With this production both Director Danielle Wilson and scenographer David Vivian look forward to honoring the wit and intelligence of our departed colleague, Dr Marlene Moser, a leading scholar of the oeuvre of Judith Thompson. Moser’s published thesis entitled “Postmodern Feminist Readings of Identity in selected works of Judith Thompson, Margaret Hollingsworth and Patricia Gruben” (Ph.D. Thesis, 1998. Graduate Center for Study of Drama University of Toronto) and the article “Identities of Ambivalence: Judith Thompson’s Perfect Pie” (Theatre Research in Canada, Volume 27 Number 1/ Spring 2006), explore themes of gender, narrative, identification of the subject and patriarchal abuse, dwelling upon their relationship to the stage, the language and how the audience will perceive them.

    High School Teachers and Educators: please read this letter for detailed information about the production, curriculum ties, and student matinee booking.

     

    Lion in the Streets: A Study Guide, is an introduction to our production, prepared by our Dramaturge and Third Year DART student, Erica Charles. Included are: 1) Collaboration, 2) Play Synopsis, 3) The Playwright: Judith Thompson, 4) Director’s Notes, 5) Designer’s Notes, 6) Isobel and her Lion, 7) Symbolism, 8) Images, 9) An Interview with Judith Thompson by Eleanor Wachtel, 10) Additional References, 11) List of Figures, 12) Endnotes and Bibliography.

    Download your PDF copy of Lion in the Streets: A Study Guide
    (PDF, 8.7 MB, remotely hosted)

    Download a copy of the poster (PDF, 1 MB)
    Download a copy of the poster (PDF, 1 MB)

    Buy tickets at arts.brocku.ca


    Press:

    “Dramatic Arts play explores the death of a young girl” – see the article in The Brock News


    Photos:

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  • Orpheus Descending

    Written by Tennessee Williams

    Directed by Virginia Reh
    Designed by Michael Greves

    The tragedy of a closed society, destroying the ‘other’ within and without.
    – Virginia Reh, director

    November 10, 2011 – 7:30 pm
    November 11, 2011 – matinee 1 pm AND 7:30 pm
    November 12, 2011 – 7:30 pm

    Adults $15 : Students/Seniors $12 : eyeGO $5 : Group Rates $10. Buy tickets at arts.brocku.ca

    All DART students receive ONE free ticket.

    Orpheus Descending is a modern version of the Greek myth in which Orpheus, the beloved musician of the gods, goes down to the underworld to rescue his dead wife Eurydice. Orpheus is forbidden to look at his wife until they are clear of the underworld, but he cannot resist, looks, and loses her forever. In Williams’ play, Valentine Xavier (Val), a guitar-playing stranger, comes into a small town in the U.S South and “rescues” an unhappy Lady Torrance. He breaks the rules of the tight society of the town, with catastrophic results.

    The play was first performed on Broadway in 1957 and was adapted for the screen in 1959, starring Marlon Brando. With this presentation the Marilyn I. Walker School of Fine and Performing Arts is celebrating the 100th birthday of this great twentieth century American playwright. This is one of many productions from the Williams’ canon to be seen this season, including The Night of the Iguana at Hart House Theatre in Toronto, Cat on a Hot Tin Roof at the Shaw Festival, Camino Real at the Goodman Theatre in Chicago and The Wooster Group’s innovative rendition of Vieux Carré in New York.

    Director Virginia Reh is delighted to have Brock alumnus Michael Greves design this production of Orpheus Descending. Since graduating from the Department of Dramatic Arts Greves has been involved in countless productions including the Shaw Festival and was seen recently on stage in Stray Theatre’s production of Les chaises at the Sullivan Mahoney Theatre. Our production stars 17 second through fourth year students supported by student colleagues in direction, dramaturgy, stagecraft and production.

    High School Teachers and Educators: please read this letter for detailed information about the production, curriculum ties, and student matinee booking.

    Orpheus Descending: A Study Guide, is an introduction to our production, prepared by our creative production team. Chapter titles include: Collaboration, List of Characters, The Plot, The Playwright: Tennessee Williams, Director’s Notes, Production History, Faith, Myth and Spirituality, Aunt Conjure and the Choctaw, Historical Content, Dramaturge’s Notes, Discussion Questions, List of Terms, List of Figures, Endnotes and Bibliography.

    Download your PDF copy of Orpheus Descending: A Study Guide
    (PDF, 2 MB)


    Selected Press Coverage:

    Brock University’s Orpheus Descending points spotlight at outsiders
    see the article by Jonathan van Ekelenberg in The Niagara News

    preview article and video in the St. Catharines Standard

    Celebrating 100 years of Tennessee Williams in The Brock Press

    This year, the Department of Dramatic Arts at Brock University presents Tennesse Williams’ Orpheus Descending directed by Virginia Reh. Pictured is a screenshot from a video feature in the series “Artist Profiles” by BROCK TV, which includes questions answered by Virginia Reh, and actors Trevor Ketcheson and Rebekka Gondosch. This video is not currently online.


    Photos:

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    Categories: Events, Plays

  • Phèdre

    phedre-poster-draft-v2-copy-web_0Phèdre

    Written by Jean Racine
    Translated by Ted Hughes
    Directed by Virginia Reh
    Designed by David Vivian

    Feb. 17, 18, 19, 2011 at 7:30 p.m.

    Student Matinee: Friday, Feb. 18, 2011 at 01:00 p.m.

    adults $15.00
    students and seniors $12.00
    $5.00 matinee for Brock students and staff

    The myth of Phèdre is one of the most powerful in all of classical mythology. Believing her absent husband Theseus to be dead, the Queen confesses her obsession for stepson Hippolytus, thus entering a nightmare world and spinning a tale of passion that unwinds with disastrous consequences.

    Held at the Sean O’Sullivan Theatre, call the Centre for the Arts Box Office, 905-688-5550, ext. 3257 for tickets.

    High School teachers and Educators: A description of the play and the performance is available for download (3 mb, PDF). Subjects include: The Play, Artistic Direction, Curriculum Ties, Student Matinee Booking, Study Guide/School Outreach.

    Phèdre: A Primer, is an introduction to our production, prepared by our Dramaturge and Fourth Year DART student, Spencer Smith. Included are:
    1) Collaboration, 2) Play Synopsis, 3) Director’s Notes, 4) Scenographer’s Notes, 5) The Playwright: Jean-Baptiste Racine, 6) The Translator: Ted Hughes, 7) Family Tree, 8) The Myths: Theseus, Phaedra, and Hippolytus, 9) The Labyrinth of Lexicon: People and Places, 10) The Many Faces of Phaedra, 11) Dramaturge’s Notes, 12) List of Figures, 13) Bibliography.

    Download your PDF copy of Phèdre: A Primer (PDF, 16.1 MB, remotely hosted)


    Media:

    See the article in The Brock News

    Professor Virginia Reh speaks about life in theatre and the production of Phedre that was performed by students of DART in the Sean O’Sullivan Theatre in 2011. Screenshot from a video interview in the series “University People”, by BROCK TV.


    Photos:

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    Categories: Events, Plays

  • Blood Relations

    Written by Sharon Pollock

    Directed by Danielle Wilson
    Designed by Kelly Wolf

    November 11, 12, 13, 2010 at 7:30 p.m.
    Student Matinee: Friday, November 12, 2010 at 1:00 p.m.

    “Lizzie Borden took an axe, gave her mother forty whacks…” In June of 1893, Lizzie Borden stood trial for the brutal murders of her father and stepmother, thus inspiring the popular children’s rhyme. Borden was acquitted but the crime was never solved. So did she, or didn’t she?

    Held at the Sean O’Sullivan Theatre, call the Centre for the Arts Box Office, 905-688-5550, ext. 3257 for tickets.
    Adult $15 / Seniors $12 / Students $12 / Groups $10 / eyeGo $5
    Presented by the Department of Dramatic Arts.

    Please see the MEDIA RELEASE

    High School teachers and Educators: A description of the play and the performance is available for download (3 mb, PDF). Subjects include: The Play, Artistic Direction, Curriculum Ties, Student Matinee Booking, Study Guide/School Outreach.

    Blood Relations: A Primer, is an introduction to our production, written by our Dramaturge and Fourth Year DART student, Spencer Smith. Included are: 1. Production Synopsis; 2. Lizzie Borden: The Legend; 3. Veins of Blood Relations; 4. Director’s Notes; 5. Sharon Pollock: The Playwright; 6. Collaboration; 7. List of Figures; 8. Bibliography.

    Download your PDF copy of Blood Relations: A Primer (PDF, 10.3 MB, remotely hosted)

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    Categories: Events, Plays