Articles tagged with: Biological Sciences

  • Sept 11 – Master of Science Thesis Defence – Mr. Patrick Zaprzala

    Master of Science thesis defence

    Mr. Patrick Zaprzala, a Master of Science candidate in the Department of Biological Sciences, will defend his thesis titled “Role of Exopolysaccharide in Pantoea agglomerans Interactions with Bacteriophages” on Wednesday, September 11 at 11 a.m. in MC H313.

    The examination committee includes Cheryl McCormick, Chair; Alan Castle, Supervisor; Hany Anany, External Examiner (Guelph Research and Development Centre, AAFC); and Antonet Svircev and Aleksandar Necakov, Committee Members.

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  • Sept 9 – Master of Science Thesis Defence – Justin Mark Bridgeman

    Master of Science thesis defence

    Mr. Justin Mark Bridgeman, a Master of Science candidate in the Department of Biological Sciences, will defend his thesis titled “Behavioural Thermoregulation and Escape Behaviour: Investigating the Impact of Climate Change on Round Gobies” on Monday, September 9 at 9 a.m. in Cairns 207.

    The examination committee includes Cheryl McCormick, Chair; Glenn Tattersall, Supervisor; Dennis M. Higgs, External Examiner (University of Windsor); and Patricia A. Wright (University of Guelph), Gaynor Spencer and Liette Vasseur, Committee Members.

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  • Aug 22 – Master of Science Thesis Defence – Devin Patrick Ward

    Master of Science thesis defence

    Devin Patrick Ward, a Master of Science candidate in the Department of Biological Sciences, will defend his thesis titled “Engineering Optogenetic Control of Endocytic Recycling: Controlling Rab11 Function in Drosophila melanogaster using Engineered Light-Responsive Nanobodies” on Thursday, August 22 at 9 a.m. in PLZ 600F.

    The examination committee includes Cheryl McCormick, Chair; Aleksandar Necakov, Supervisor; Roger Jacobs, External Examiner (McMaster University); and Alan Castle and Heather Gordon, Committee Members.

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  • Exploring Careers in Biology

    The first-ever Exploring Careers in Biology event will take place Wednesday, March 6 in Pond Inlet from 5:30 to 7:30 p.m.

    Students will engage with industry professionals at this round table networking event to gain insight and advice from people who are currently working in the field.

    Registration for the event is now open and has been limited to 50 spots. Additional registrants will be placed on a waiting list and notified should a spot open up for them.

    Food will be available. Door prizes to be presented.

    Register today.

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  • August 2: Master of Science thesis defence

    Biological Sciences student Moustafa Zeidan will defend his Master of Science thesis, “Testosterone’s regulation of the HPA axis differs for adolescent and adult male rats” by via conference Thursday, August 2 at 11 a.m. in MC H313.

    The examination committee includes Kirill Samokhin, chair; Ashley Monks, external examiner (University of Toronto); Cheryl McCormick, supervisor; Gaynor Spencer and Glenn Tattersall.

    August 2 Thesis Defence

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  • FMS Student Among Winners at International SCAN Health Virtual Business Case Competition

    FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

    WINDSOR, May 7, 2018 – The Supply Chain Advancement Network in Health (SCAN Health), proudly hosted by the Odette School of Business, University of Windsor is pleased to announce the winning teams of the inaugural SCAN Health Virtual Business Case Competition. Outstanding students from leading business schools around the world are recognized for their exceptional innovative thinking and practical approaches to scaling supply chain transformation across the United Kingdom’s National Health Services (NHS) Scan4Safety initiative to 148 trusts of NHS England. Congratulations to the winning teams:

    1st Place – Tied
    Mariska van der Feen, Tessa Jansen, Eva Jelovčan (Erasmus University Rotterdam)
    James J. Hall, Olivia Poulin, Matthew McGarr, Michael Tolentino (Brock University)

    Michael is a Biomed student at Brock University.

    3rd Place
    Scarlett Kelly, Chris Smith (Dalhousie University)

    Prizes courtesy of TECSYS Inc. are awarded to the top three teams. Winners also receive an invitation to the Annual SCAN Health Global Networking Event in Alberta, Canada on June 5, 2018. This exclusive event provides an opportunity to engage with global leaders from industry, health systems, government and academia to examine key dimensions of supply chain infrastructure to improve health system sustainability, population health and economic growth.

    Proposals were judged by an esteemed international panel including Chair Dr. Kevin Schulman of Duke University (US), joined by Mr. Robert Drag of Salisbury NHS (UK), Mr. Desmond Griffiths of Electromac (CAN), Mr. Richard Martin of TECSYS (CAN), Dr. Liz Mear of the Innovation Agency (UK), Mr. Graham Medwell of Leeds Teaching Hospitals NHS (UK), Dr. Libby Roughead of the University of South Australia (AUS), Dr. Karin Schnarr of Wilfrid Laurier University (CAN) and Dr. Dave Williams, Canadian astronaut, physician and CEO (retired).

    This unique virtual competition enables emergent leaders from business schools around the world to compete and demonstrate their exceptional skill, knowledge and innovative ideas to advance health sector supply chain innovation. The competition encourages cross-disciplinary teams from business and health sciences to collaborate to build leadership capacity in health sector supply chain. To further strengthen knowledge of business processes in health systems each team has access to a panel of internationally renowned leaders and experts in health system supply chain and logistics strategy. The next SCAN Health Virtual Business Case Competition will launch Fall 2018. Details and updates can be found at www.SCANHealth.ca.

    About SCAN Health

    SCAN Health is an international knowledge translation organization funded by the Government of Canada, Networks of Centres of Excellence (NCE) and hosted by the University of Windsor’s Odette School of Business. Spanning five countries, including Australia, the Netherlands, the United Kingdom, the United States and Canada – and with over one hundred partners from industry, healthcare, government and academia – SCAN Health will advance global capacity to adopt and scale best practices in healthcare supply chain to offer traceability of products and care processes from bench to bedside to patient outcomes.

    – 30 –

    SCAN Health Media Contact:
    Kathryn Cox
    (905) 213-8384
    Kathryn.Cox.SCANHealth@uwindsor.ca

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  • FMS student videos among Top 15 of national science research contest

    A Brock University student has scored third place in a national science research video contest, with two other Brock student videos among the contest’s Top 15 finalists.

    Science, Action! features student-produced, 60-second videos on research projects funded by the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada (NSERC), one of Brock’s major research funders.

    Taylor Lidster took third place with her video, On the Fly. Two other videos – produced by Matthew Mueller and the team of Zakia Dahi and Jina Nanayakkara — were included in the Top 15 of finalists from universities across Canada.

    All four students are from the Department of Biological Sciences. Mueller, Dahi and Lidster are master’s students, while Nanayakkara has just completed her undergraduate degree.

    “It’s wonderful to see Brock student researchers being recognized nationally, both for the excellence of their research projects and for their ability to explain the impact and significance of their work,” says Brock Vice-President, Research Tim Kenyon.

    “The remarkable extent of Brock students’ success in the Science, Action! program is a powerful indication of their calibre, and a great credit to the training and research mentorship they receive from Brock University professors,” he says.

    Lidster’s On the Fly shows how the fruit fly is used to study inflammation in the gut. The researchers use genetic techniques and microscopy to see any changes in the gut environment, good or bad.

    Mueller’s Cell Talk explains that the root cause of several contemporary diseases is a disruption in communication between cells, examines the language that cells use to talk to one another, and describes how this changes in diseases such as Alzheimer’s and cancer.

    DNA: A Mobile Molecule, by Dahi and Nanayakkara, explores how DNA sequences that move around – called “jumping genes” – copy and paste themselves into different parts of our genomes. The research aims to understand how “jumping genes” have led to human variation and disease.

    The Science, Action! contest enables students to present their NSERC-funded science research to a wide audience.

     

    Students entering the contest faced some big challenges. In mid-February, NSERC posted 75 video entries from students across Canada; seven of these videos were from Brock. The 25 videos with the most views by March 2 would then make it to the next round. Five Brock videos made it into the Top 25. From there, a panel of judges selected the Top 15.

    Read the full story here

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  • FMS students receive President’s Surgite Awards

    They’re student leaders who have made significant contributions to Brock University or the wider community, and on Monday they were honoured with the President’s Surgite Awards.

    Ten Brock students from across the University’s seven Faculties were given the awards in recognition for the work they’ve done during their time studying here.

    “Students at Brock are supported and encouraged to develop their leadership, academic, student life and community engagement skills and contributions,” said President Gervan Fearon. “The students receiving these awards have excelled at these activities and exemplify the values of being outstanding students at the University and across the broader community.”

     

    Tom Dunk, Interim Provost and Vice-President, Academic, said the awards are meant to be an extra achievement students can use as they head out into the workforce.

    “We recognize in that doing what you’ve done, it’s good for your resumés, but you’ve also improved the lives of our students and life at Brock, and in some cases, within the broader community. We recognize your contribution to making everyone proud of Brock locally, nationally and beyond.”

    2017-18 President’s Surgite Award winners:

    • Allison Flynn-Bowman, Community Health
    • Aniqah Zowmi, Social Justice and Equity Studies
    • Evans Boadi, Mathematics and Statistics
    • Sarah Mohammed, Child Health
    • Nicholas Lepore, Accounting
    • Michael Tolentino, Biomedical Sciences
    • Aynsley Maves, Concurrent Education
    • Christine Saleeb, Medical Sciences
    • Vanessa Cservid, Medical Sciences
    • Matthew McGarr, Medical Sciences

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  • Brock research examines messaging to encourage less red meat consumption

    With the beef industry acting as a major contributor to greenhouse gasses, Brock University researchers are examining what can be done to cut down on the consumption of red meat by Canadians.

    Brock food scientist Gary Pickering and graduate student Samantha Stea are examining what type of messaging works to encourage people to either lessen their red meat consumption or stop eating it all together.

    The duo asked 593 red-meat eaters from across Canada why they eat beef, pork, lamb and other red meat, as well as how much they know about the environmental impacts of red meat farming.

    “Taste and quality are the most important motivators when it comes to consuming red meat,” says Stea, who recently completed a Master of Sustainability degree.

    Interestingly, the fourth-highest motivation for eating red meat was for health reasons, going against “traditional wisdom” that consuming too much red meat is actually bad for human health, says Pickering, a Professor of Biological Sciences and Psychology, as well as in Brock’s Environmental Sustainability Research Centre.

    “Concerns around the ethics and morality of eating red meat were very low,” he says.

    Participants read a list of 13 environmental impacts — including global warming, deforestation, overuse of land, acid rain, soil contamination and others — and ticked off those they thought were associated with red meat consumption.

    Pickering and Stea then presented the red meat eaters with one of six message types that contained information about the environmental impacts of red meat production.

     

    The researchers then asked participants several questions about their intended future red meat consumption.

    Participants also re-read the list of 13 environmental impacts and once again ticked off those they thought were associated with red meat consumption. In all 13 categories, the red meat eaters’ knowledge and awareness of the environmental impacts of red meat farming increased.

    The researchers say several important lessons can be drawn from their study, “Optimizing Messaging to Reduce Red Meat Consumption,” which was published earlier this year in the journal Environmental Communication, and won the Best Paper Award at the International Conference on Food and Agriculture Technologies in Bali, Indonesia last year.

    Stea says the results paint a hopeful picture of what can be done to protect the environment.

    Read the full story here


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  • Brock-led study examines role of protein levels in preterm birth

    A Brock-led international research team is developing an approach to predict if women in the early stages of pregnancy are at risk of experiencing a premature birth.

    The team, headed by Professor of Health Sciences and Biological Sciences Jens Coorssen, discovered that the levels of certain proteins found in the mother’s blood during the first trimester can potentially act as early predictors or biomarkers of premature birth.

    “There aren’t any good markers of preterm birth, even in the second and third trimester,” says Coorssen. “The idea was, can we identify markers in the blood samples of women taken during their first routine checkup between 11 and 13 weeks?”

    Preterm birth, which occurs before 37 weeks, is the leading cause of death in children under the age of five, according to the World Health Organization.

    The research team, consisting of Coorssen, PhD student Arlene D’Silva and University of Sydney researcher Jon Hyett, analyzed blood samples from 20 women who were each around 12 weeks pregnant.

    The researchers examined the total set of proteins contained in a part of the blood called serum.

    “We were looking to see if there are different levels of specific proteins in the blood of women who go on to have a normal term delivery versus women who go on to have a pre-term delivery,” he says. “That way we can identify women at risk early and cut down on emergency interventions, and the complications often associated with premature birth.”

    Those women subsequently experiencing a preterm birth had significantly higher or lower levels of 30 different protein species, 20 of which included specific modifications that can alter their functions or locations.

    They also have lower levels of complement C3, a protein that, when activated, kills invading microbes without damaging surrounding tissues. The protein becomes active when encountering a bacteria, virus or other harmful substance.

    These and other findings are in the team’s paper, “Proteomic analysis of first trimester maternal serum to identify candidate biomarkers potentially predictive of spontaneous preterm birth,” published Feb. 13 in the Journal of Proteomics.

    Coorssen says researchers don’t know what causes these protein levels to change, or which of these proteins might be linked more directly to cellular processes that may cause preterm labour.

    “Understanding the cellular and molecular processes involved in preterm labour, which is also part of the ongoing project, is the only route to developing new, targeted medicines,” he says.

    “What we’re immediately interested in right now, though, is if there is a way to identify these women at risk early so that they can be better monitored and managed so as to avoid a preterm event.”

    Coorssen says future research would focus on expanding the number of research participants and focusing more on mechanisms as well.

    The World Health Organization says 15 million babies — one in 10 — are born too early every year, with one million children dying each year due to complications of preterm birth. Many survivors face a lifetime of disability, including breathing issues, learning disabilities and visual and hearing problems. The agency lists a number of measures during pregnancy to avoid preterm births, such as antenatal steroid injections, nutritional counselling, avoiding tobacco and drug use, and “a minimum of eight contacts with health professionals” to identify risk factors.

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