Undergraduate program

  • Obtaining an Honours BSc in Computer Science degree opens up many career paths in industry and graduate school.   
  • The curriculum is competitive with other BSc (Hon) programs throughout Canada and the world, and is designed around Association of Computing Machinery  (ACM) recommendations.  
  • This degree presents essential topics in computer science, ranging from programming, algorithm design and analysis, formal computer theory, fundamentals of computing technology (networks, operating systems), and artificial intelligence. Later years allow you to select electives in a number of advanced topics in systems design, AI, and formal methods.  
  • A variety of joint Honours programs involving other disciplines are available. 
  • Success in the Honours BSc requires that students are comfortable with topics in computer programming, mathematics and computing theory.  
  • All Honours programs require that students must maintain a 70 major average and 60 non-major average. 
  • The Co-op (Honours) degree is virtually identical to the Honours program, except that it also includes three co-op work terms spanning 1 year of industry employment, as well as preparatory co-op courses in the first year. This means that the duration of study is lengthened by 8 months compared to non-co-op students.  
  • The co-op program is the most popular option for students, since it offers an invaluable opportunity for gaining real-world work experience, as well as making some money to help support students during their studies. 
  • Like the Honours program, success in Co-op Honours requires students to be comfortable in a variety of programming, computer theory, and mathematics courses. Students will be expected to perform satisfactorily during their work terms. 
  • This is a 4-year degree in Computer Science, and is very similar to the Honours degree. 
  • A difference with the Major is that students do not need to maintain a major average of 70, but instead require a 60 major average.  
  • The degree has slightly lighter mathematics and theoretical course requirements compared to Honours.  
  • Students who may not be considering graduate school often choose the Major program, although this does not prevent them from doing so should they choose that option. 
  • These two degrees – Honours and BSc with Major –  are available to students who already have graduated with a university degree.  
  • The programs are reduced by one year of study, by focussing on fundamental courses, and removing elective options.  Otherwise, students will receive the same essential computer science education as those in the 4-year programs. 
  • The BSc in Computing and Business (COBU) is a specialized degree that combines computer science courses with business courses in Brock’s Goodman School of Business.  
  • This degree is ideal for students who are motivated to pursue a career in industry careers that require education in both computer science and business.  
  • Many companies need talented employees who are not only expert computer programmers and technologists, but also understand the concepts of modern business.  
  • Computing and Business graduates will satisfy this innovative combination of skills and expertise, which is not necessarily found in those with either pure Computer Science or Business degrees. 
  • The co-op option extends the duration of the program with work terms in industry. 
  • This degree requires continued Honours standing (70 major average, 60 non-major average).  
  • Computing and Network Communications (CNET) is a specialized degree done jointly with Sheridan College. The program schedule involves taking different terms of study at both institutions. 
  • The degree focusses on all aspects of computer network technology and administration.  
  • Being a co-op program,  students will have work terms in industry.  Graduates proceed to industry jobs that require programming and network security expertise. 
  • This applies to Honours and 4-year Major programs as applicable with other departments and availability with their degrees. 
  • There are specific double-major programs as per the course calendar descriptions. 
  • Some of the combined majors include a Co-op option as per the course calendar descriptions. These are for Honour programs only. 
  • The BSc in Game Programming (GAMP) is a joint degree delivered by the Department of Computer Science, Centre of Digital Humanities, and Niagara College.
  • This degree focusses on computer game development, and includes wide range of topics ranging from fundamental and advanced computer science courses, to specialized courses specific to game design and implementation.  
  • Acceptance to the GAMP program is highly competitive, and enrollment is limited.  
  • Being an Honours degree, a 70-major average must be maintained to continue studying in the program.   
  • The majority of GAMP graduates pursue careers in the computer game industry.  
  • The Applied Computing (APCO) minor is available to all students at Brock who are not majors in Computer Science degrees mentioned above.   
  • This minor is an ideal way to supplement a degree with a variety of computer skills and knowledge. APCO courses will introduce students to computer applications (for example, MS Office), Python programming, human-computer interface design, digital ethics, and personal computers and networks.  
  • Students can also take a number of computer science courses for APCO minor credit.  
  • The skills obtained for an APCO minor will benefit graduates in their future careers, especially given the great need for people with computer skills in industry and government. 

More program information

Read more about the Computer Science undergraduate program at Brock University including admission requirements and how to apply.