News

  • Sept 14 – Master of Science Thesis Defence – Binal Tejani

    Master of Science thesis defence

    Binal Tejani, a Master of Science candidate in the Department of Computer Sciences, will defend his thesis titled “Game Theory-based Allocation Management in VCC Networks” on Tuesday, September 14, 2021 at 1 p.m., in virtual format.

    The examination committee includes Cheryl McCormick, Chair; Robson De Grande, Supervisor; Ke Qiu, External Examiner; and Brian Ross and Sheridan Houghten, Committee Members.

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  • Experiential education exemplified through Earth Sciences field trip

    The cold weather didn’t stop a group of students from making a trip up north this April.

    Hernan Ugalde, Adjunct Professor for the Department of Earth Sciences, led the group of nine students to 10 different locations in the Bracebridge area as part of a field trip for ERSC 4P01 – Advanced Structural Geology.

    After securing a Teaching and Learning Innovation (TALI) grant, Ugalde planned out the trip so his students could apply the concepts they learned in class to real-world scenarios.

    In its third-year prerequisite, students focus more on the basic concepts of how rocks fracture and deform from a strain or stress point of view. This course further teaches students about additional concepts regarding the deformation of rock, with more of an emphasis on ductile deformation (i.e. how rocks fold) and the field recognition and description of all these features.

    “Geology is all about recognizing features in the field,” said Ugalde. “And while you can show pictures of how things look like in real life, that is never the same as seeing them on a fresh or weathered rock face.”

    “Most of the time you have a combination of features (e.g. a fold that has been deformed by joints or fractures after), and you can’t really replicate these features with photos on the screen,” he added.

    One week before the trip, Ugalde travelled to the area and scouted out locations for the students to examine. At each location, students are given a brief explanation on the geological context for that site and are then asked to look at the rock face and give an overview of what they saw (e.g. what kind of rocks, what kind of deformation features).

    Students then took measurements with their compasses which were later processed through compilation diagrams. These diagrams give an idea on the main directions of stress that each site has suffered. The measurements also help in forming a 3D view from the outcrop itself and provide insight into important quantitative measurements as well.

    As a follow-up, the students who attended the trip work on a report that will provide a summary of the location, geology, sketches, measurements for all 10 sites.

    The trip itself is an example of the many experiential education opportunities that are available for students in the Faculty of Math and Science both inside and outside the classroom.

    What Students Have to Say:

    “I found it very beneficial to apply the theoretical knowledge learned in lectures and labs, to real-life situations you would see in the workforce.” – Brendan Llew-Williams

    “I feel that I have learned more than I have over a semester of learning. Being able to visualize and find diagnostic properties within a rock formation rather than looking at diagrams from a lecture was, to me, so much more beneficial.” – Thomas Henley

    “The field trip was invaluable, especially for structural geology.  Some of the concepts learned in a lecture setting aren’t easily grasped until you can see them in real life.” – Nate Sabourin

     

     

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  • Celebrate 50 Years of Earth Sciences

    Originally founded in 1968 as the Department of Geological Sciences, 50 years later, it’s time to celebrate!
    As a graduate of one of our programs, we hope that you’ll join us during Homecoming Weekend in September to reconnect and reminisce with fellow alumni, faculty and staff. We’ve arranged several events specifically for you and you won’t want to miss out!

    50 Years of Earth Sciences Symposium
    Date: Friday, September 21, 2018
    Time: 2 to 6pm
    Location: Pond Inlet, Brock University

    Learn what your fellow graduates have accomplished since graduating from Brock. We also encourage everyone to share memories of their years at Brock at the Symposium, with opportunities to socialize with one another, students, faculty and staff throughout the afternoon.
    A cash bar will be available and light refreshments will be provided.

    Earth Sciences Networking Brunch
    Date: Saturday, September 22, 2018
    Time: 11am to 1pm
    Location: Pond Inlet, Brock University

    Join us for a complimentary bite to eat – the day after our Symposium – before you head out to participate in other Homecoming activities. Share your insights and experiences with current students and recent graduates and meet the geoscientists of tomorrow as well as your fellow alumni in a more casual setting.

    REGISter HERE

    See you in September!

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  • FMS Prof presented invited plenary lecture

    Professor Hichem Ben-El-Mechaiekh (Department of Mathematics and Statistics) presented an invited plenary lecture at the international conference OTHA 2018: Modern Methods, Problems and Applications of Operator Theory and Harmonic Analysis – VIII, 22-27 April 2018, Rostov-on-Don, Russia

    The title of his talk was “Generalized Variational Inequalities Without Convexity”.

    OTHA is one of the largest first-class international analysis conferences in Russia. It is sponsored by the Southern Federal University, the Don State Technical University, the Russian Foundation of Basic Research, and the International Society for Analysis, Its Applications and Computation. This was its 8th edition.

    LINK to website

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  • FMS Student Among Winners at International SCAN Health Virtual Business Case Competition

    FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

    WINDSOR, May 7, 2018 – The Supply Chain Advancement Network in Health (SCAN Health), proudly hosted by the Odette School of Business, University of Windsor is pleased to announce the winning teams of the inaugural SCAN Health Virtual Business Case Competition. Outstanding students from leading business schools around the world are recognized for their exceptional innovative thinking and practical approaches to scaling supply chain transformation across the United Kingdom’s National Health Services (NHS) Scan4Safety initiative to 148 trusts of NHS England. Congratulations to the winning teams:

    1st Place – Tied
    Mariska van der Feen, Tessa Jansen, Eva Jelovčan (Erasmus University Rotterdam)
    James J. Hall, Olivia Poulin, Matthew McGarr, Michael Tolentino (Brock University)

    Michael is a Biomed student at Brock University.

    3rd Place
    Scarlett Kelly, Chris Smith (Dalhousie University)

    Prizes courtesy of TECSYS Inc. are awarded to the top three teams. Winners also receive an invitation to the Annual SCAN Health Global Networking Event in Alberta, Canada on June 5, 2018. This exclusive event provides an opportunity to engage with global leaders from industry, health systems, government and academia to examine key dimensions of supply chain infrastructure to improve health system sustainability, population health and economic growth.

    Proposals were judged by an esteemed international panel including Chair Dr. Kevin Schulman of Duke University (US), joined by Mr. Robert Drag of Salisbury NHS (UK), Mr. Desmond Griffiths of Electromac (CAN), Mr. Richard Martin of TECSYS (CAN), Dr. Liz Mear of the Innovation Agency (UK), Mr. Graham Medwell of Leeds Teaching Hospitals NHS (UK), Dr. Libby Roughead of the University of South Australia (AUS), Dr. Karin Schnarr of Wilfrid Laurier University (CAN) and Dr. Dave Williams, Canadian astronaut, physician and CEO (retired).

    This unique virtual competition enables emergent leaders from business schools around the world to compete and demonstrate their exceptional skill, knowledge and innovative ideas to advance health sector supply chain innovation. The competition encourages cross-disciplinary teams from business and health sciences to collaborate to build leadership capacity in health sector supply chain. To further strengthen knowledge of business processes in health systems each team has access to a panel of internationally renowned leaders and experts in health system supply chain and logistics strategy. The next SCAN Health Virtual Business Case Competition will launch Fall 2018. Details and updates can be found at www.SCANHealth.ca.

    About SCAN Health

    SCAN Health is an international knowledge translation organization funded by the Government of Canada, Networks of Centres of Excellence (NCE) and hosted by the University of Windsor’s Odette School of Business. Spanning five countries, including Australia, the Netherlands, the United Kingdom, the United States and Canada – and with over one hundred partners from industry, healthcare, government and academia – SCAN Health will advance global capacity to adopt and scale best practices in healthcare supply chain to offer traceability of products and care processes from bench to bedside to patient outcomes.

    – 30 –

    SCAN Health Media Contact:
    Kathryn Cox
    (905) 213-8384
    Kathryn.Cox.SCANHealth@uwindsor.ca

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  • FMS student videos among Top 15 of national science research contest

    A Brock University student has scored third place in a national science research video contest, with two other Brock student videos among the contest’s Top 15 finalists.

    Science, Action! features student-produced, 60-second videos on research projects funded by the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada (NSERC), one of Brock’s major research funders.

    Taylor Lidster took third place with her video, On the Fly. Two other videos – produced by Matthew Mueller and the team of Zakia Dahi and Jina Nanayakkara — were included in the Top 15 of finalists from universities across Canada.

    All four students are from the Department of Biological Sciences. Mueller, Dahi and Lidster are master’s students, while Nanayakkara has just completed her undergraduate degree.

    “It’s wonderful to see Brock student researchers being recognized nationally, both for the excellence of their research projects and for their ability to explain the impact and significance of their work,” says Brock Vice-President, Research Tim Kenyon.

    “The remarkable extent of Brock students’ success in the Science, Action! program is a powerful indication of their calibre, and a great credit to the training and research mentorship they receive from Brock University professors,” he says.

    Lidster’s On the Fly shows how the fruit fly is used to study inflammation in the gut. The researchers use genetic techniques and microscopy to see any changes in the gut environment, good or bad.

    Mueller’s Cell Talk explains that the root cause of several contemporary diseases is a disruption in communication between cells, examines the language that cells use to talk to one another, and describes how this changes in diseases such as Alzheimer’s and cancer.

    DNA: A Mobile Molecule, by Dahi and Nanayakkara, explores how DNA sequences that move around – called “jumping genes” – copy and paste themselves into different parts of our genomes. The research aims to understand how “jumping genes” have led to human variation and disease.

    The Science, Action! contest enables students to present their NSERC-funded science research to a wide audience.

     

    Students entering the contest faced some big challenges. In mid-February, NSERC posted 75 video entries from students across Canada; seven of these videos were from Brock. The 25 videos with the most views by March 2 would then make it to the next round. Five Brock videos made it into the Top 25. From there, a panel of judges selected the Top 15.

    Read the full story here

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  • Brock community mourns Math employee Darrell Short

    Brock University is mourning the loss of long-time employee Darrell Short, who spent nearly four decades working with the Department of Mathematics and Statistics.

    Short died Tuesday, April 17 at the age of 61.

    He held many roles with the University over the years, including teaching assistant, instructor and course co-ordinator, and was known for helping and inspiring countless students in a multitude of courses.

    “His contributions to the Department were immeasurable, touching the lives of students, faculty and staff members alike,” said a tribute on the Department’s website. “He will be missed very much by all of us. It simply won’t be the same place now that he has passed.”

    For more information, please see Short’s obituary.

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  • FMS recipients of Jack M. Miller Excellence in Research Award

    During the Faculty of Graduate Studies’ Mapping the New Knowledges Conference awards ceremony, two graduate students from the Faculty of Mathematics and Science were honoured with the 2018 Jack M. Miller Excellence in Research Award. This award is given to research-based graduate students who are working on innovative projects.

    This year’s Faculty of Mathematics and Science recipients are:

    Alyssa Davis
    MSc Earth Science
    Studying “Paleoatmospheric and paleoenvironmental interpretations of the Early Paleozoic”

    Guan Wang
    PhD Chemistry
    Studying, “Analytical devides and assays for point-of-care disease diagnosis”

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  • FMS students receive President’s Surgite Awards

    They’re student leaders who have made significant contributions to Brock University or the wider community, and on Monday they were honoured with the President’s Surgite Awards.

    Ten Brock students from across the University’s seven Faculties were given the awards in recognition for the work they’ve done during their time studying here.

    “Students at Brock are supported and encouraged to develop their leadership, academic, student life and community engagement skills and contributions,” said President Gervan Fearon. “The students receiving these awards have excelled at these activities and exemplify the values of being outstanding students at the University and across the broader community.”

     

    Tom Dunk, Interim Provost and Vice-President, Academic, said the awards are meant to be an extra achievement students can use as they head out into the workforce.

    “We recognize in that doing what you’ve done, it’s good for your resumés, but you’ve also improved the lives of our students and life at Brock, and in some cases, within the broader community. We recognize your contribution to making everyone proud of Brock locally, nationally and beyond.”

    2017-18 President’s Surgite Award winners:

    • Allison Flynn-Bowman, Community Health
    • Aniqah Zowmi, Social Justice and Equity Studies
    • Evans Boadi, Mathematics and Statistics
    • Sarah Mohammed, Child Health
    • Nicholas Lepore, Accounting
    • Michael Tolentino, Biomedical Sciences
    • Aynsley Maves, Concurrent Education
    • Christine Saleeb, Medical Sciences
    • Vanessa Cservid, Medical Sciences
    • Matthew McGarr, Medical Sciences

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  • Assistant Professor of Chemistry captures Ontario’s Early Researcher Awards

    Creating a device to detect prostate cancer. Determining how and why perfectionism impacts adolescent health. Understanding the process that leads to children forgetting to carry out a future intention.

    These areas of interest will be pursued by three Brock University researchers thanks to a grant from the Ontario Ministry of Research, Innovation and Science.

    Assistant Professor of Chemistry Feng Li is one of the three who received funding this year under the Ministry’s Early Researcher Awards program.

    “These rare and prestigious awards are reserved for early-career researchers whose innovative work is recognized as crucial to the social, cultural, economic and intellectual future of Ontario,” says Brock Vice-President, Research Tim Kenyon.

    “For a university of Brock’s size to receive three awards in one year is amazing and will definitely turn some heads. But it is not surprising to anyone who knows the incredible research talent that Brock has been recruiting for years.”

    Li and his team of four graduate students will develop a single device that will examine blood and urine samples for the presence of certain proteins and nucleic acids that are present in the early stages of prostate cancer.

    The device will give results in about an hour. Li previously created a three-dimensional, nano-sized robot that detects disease, which the new device, made out of paper, will read and interpret.

    At the moment, testing for these proteins and nucleic acids is done separately and requires highly complicated, time consuming and expensive equipment and processes.

    “You would use this device like you would do a pregnancy test,” he says. “You mix your samples with the 3D robot and load it onto the paper device. You would see coloured strips, just like in a pregnancy test,” says Li.

     

     

     

    The Early Researcher Awards program enables new researchers working at publicly funded Ontario research institutions to build research teams.

     

    Read about the other researchers’ work here


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