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  • A day of reflection

    On September 30, we recognize the National Day for Truth and Reconciliation. On this national day of reflection, we remember and mourn for the children and for the generations of Indigenous people hurt by the residential school system. The National Day for Truth and Reconciliation is a direct response to Call to Action 80, which called for a federal statutory day of commemoration.  

    We also recognize Orange Shirt Day, held on this day to bring awareness to the history of residential schools and their negative effects on children’s self-esteem and well-being. Orange Shirt Day was first observed in 2013 at St. Joseph Mission in Williams Lake, British Columbia, where, in 1973, Phyllis (Jack) Webstad had her new orange shirt taken away on her first day of residential school. She never saw the shirt again. We wear orange to show our commitment to recognizing and remembering the approximately 150,000 children forced to attend residential schools, where many experienced shame, deprivation, and abuse, as well as more than 6,000 students who did not survive. 

    Learn more about the impact of residential schools by exploring a selection of books, ebooks and streaming video. 

    In acknowledgement of the National Day for Truth and Reconciliation, we are screening 11 NFB short films by Indigenous film makers in Library Classroom B. Everyone is welcome to drop in at any time during the hours of 9am and 6pm to watch, listen, learn and reflect.  

    We also encourage you to write a review for any of the films you see on the NFB website. This action is inspired by a #Next150 Challenge to engage with Indigenous cinema and continue our learning. 

    List of films (with thanks to the National Film Board) 

    Nunavut Animation Lab: I Am But a Little Woman
    Gyu Oh 2010 | 4 min 

    Inspired by an Inuit poem first assigned to paper in 1927, this animated short evokes the beauty and power of nature, as well as the bond between mother and daughter. As her daughter looks on, an Inuit woman creates a wall hanging filled with images of the spectacular Arctic landscape and traditional Inuit objects and iconography. Soon the boundaries between art and reality begin to dissolve.

    Stories from Our Land 1.5: Tide
    Ericka Chemko 2012 | 4 min 

    This beautiful short film captures the majesty of ice sculpted by wind and water. By using time-lapse imagery, Iqaluit filmmaker Ericka Chemko reveals the dynamic intertidal dance of water and ice in the Arctic. 

    Stories Are in Our Bones
    Janine Windolph 2019 | 11 min 

    In this layered short film, filmmaker Janine Windolph takes her young sons fishing with their kokum (grandmother), a residential school survivor who retains a deep knowledge and memory of the land. The act of reconnecting with their homeland is a cultural and familial healing journey for the boys, who are growing up in the city. It’s also a powerful form of resistance for the women. 

    Waseteg
    Phyllis Grant 2010 | 6 min 

    Waseteg is the story of a young Mi’kmaq girl whose name means “the light from the dawn.” Sadly, her mother dies while giving birth and, though her father works very hard to provide for his family, Waseteg is surrounded by the bitterness and loneliness felt by her sisters. 

    As a young girl, Waseteg looks for solace in nature, and dreams of the stories she’s heard in the village – including one about Walqwan, the mysterious boy living across the river. Eventually, with the gentle care of the boy’s grandmother, Waseteg succeeds in finding Walqwan, discovering the Spirit Path, and restoring love to her family. 

    A short story about dreams, courage, identity, creation and embracing our Elders, Wasetegshowcases Phyllis Grant’s signature style of bold lines, bright colours and simple movements. The film is beautifully narrated by legendary filmmaker Alanis Obomsawin. 

    Vistas: Dancers of the Grass
    Melanie Jackson 2009 | 2 min 

    This short film presents a stunning display of a stop-motion animation as it vividly depicts the majesty of the hoop dance, a tradition symbolizing the unity of all nations. 

    Stories from Our Land 1.5: Inngiruti – The Thing that Sings!
    Nyla Innuksuk 2012 | 5 min 

    This short documentary filmed in Pangnirtung features 2 elders reminiscing about the dances held in their community 50 years ago. One of the elders is master accordion player Simeonie Keenainak, and soon he’s making toe-tapping music with his instrument. In this celebration of the pleasures of music and dance, Keenainak plays for the enjoyment of friends, family, and the community at large. 

    To Wake Up the Nakota Language
    Louise BigEagle 2017 | 6 min 

    “When you don’t know your language or your culture, you don’t know who you are,” says 69-year-old Armand McArthur, one of the last fluent Nakota speakers in Pheasant Rump First Nation, Treaty 4 territory, in southern Saskatchewan. Through the wisdom of his words, Armand is committed to revitalizing his language and culture for his community and future generations.  

    The Mountain of SGaana
    Christopher Auchter 2017 | 10 min 

    In The Mountain of SGaana, Haida filmmaker Christopher Auchter spins a magical tale of a young man who is stolen away to the spirit world, and the young woman who rescues him. The film brilliantly combines traditional animation with formal elements of Haida art, and is based on a story inspired by a old Haida fable. 

    Breaths
    Nyla Innuksuk 2016 | 4 min 

    In this evocative short documentary, Inuk singer-songwriter and humanitarian Susan Aglukark weaves together stories of artistry, family, and belonging as she explores the complex cultural shifts of the last 50 years of Inuit life. Turning her lens on the turbulence of colonial transition, director Nyla Innuksuk examines the forces that shaped Aglukark’s voice and how that voice is now being translated for a new generation of Inuit artists. 

    Produced by the National Film Board of Canada in co-operation with the National Arts Centre and the Governor General’s Performing Arts Awards Foundation on the occasion of the 2016 Governor General’s Performing Arts Awards. 

    Shaman
    Echo Henoche 2017 | 5 min 

    This animated short tells the story of a ferocious polar bear turned to stone by an Inuk shaman. The tale is based on emerging filmmaker Echo Henoche’s favourite legend, as told to her by her grandfather in her home community of Nain, Nunatsiavut, on Labrador’s North Coast. Hand-drawn and painted by Henoche in a style all her own, Shaman is the first collaboration between the Labrador artist and the NFB.  

    Stories from Our Land 1.5: If You Want to Get Married… You Have to Learn How to Build an Igloo!
    Allen Auksaq 2011 | 5 min 

    In the spirit of the 1949 NFB classic How to Build an Igloo, this short film records Dean Ittuksarjuat as he constructs the traditional Inuit home. From the first cut of the snow knife, to the carving of the entrance after the last block of snow has been placed on the roof, this is an inside-and-out look at the entire fascinating process. 

     

     

     

     

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  • The Wellness Book Club returns with an in-person option this October

    Registration for the Autumn Wellness Book Club is now open.  Reading fiction has so many benefits for emotional wellbeing, from reducing stress to better sleep!  This term, we will be reading Delia Owens’ 2021 novel Where the Crawdads Sing.   

    Described by the New York Times Book Review as “a painfully beautiful first novel that is at once a murder mystery, a coming-of-age narrative and a celebration of nature,” the book was also a feature film this past summer.   

    The Book Club will be hosted by Liaison Librarian, Justine Cotton, who is passionate about sharing the positive impact of reading and discussing books.  You can contact her with any questions at jcotton@brocku.ca  

    Meetings will be held in-person in October (with an option to meet virtually, if preferred).  As a part of the Club, members may choose to participate in a research study on the benefits of reading “for fun” on stress levels in university students. 

    Sign up at: bit.ly/autumnbookclub22 

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  • Omni: the power of collaboration

    Thanks to the Library’s partnership in Omni, Brock students, faculty, and staff have access to over 25.3 million books from 18 universities in Ontario.

    Fanny Dolansky, Brock professor in the Department of Classics and Archaeology, shared “I really couldn’t do my research or teaching without the support of the library and having more access to print (as well as digital) resources and efficient, reliable access, makes a huge difference! Omni and other changes at the library have revolutionized student and faculty research.”

    Over the past twelve months, Brock researchers used Omni to borrow approximately 2,000 books! In the same period, Brock Library loaned out over 1,700 books to researchers at other Omni institutions.

    To request an item in Omni, login to your library account and perform a search. Omni searches across all 18 partners for that item and when it finds an available copy, you’ll be able to place a request. You can request to pick up the book at Brock or your choice of partner library. You will be notified when your book is ready for pickup and you will enjoy the same 120-day loan period.

    Search Omni to find resources that support your coursework, as well as featured collections on a variety of themes.

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  • Experience community, join the public library

    We love libraries! All kinds. So we are delighted to announce on-campus visits by staff from the St. Catharines and Thorold Public Libraries.

    Getting a card is easy, and free. Fill in a form, present some ID, and then you’ll be all set to borrow video games, join book clubs, experience adult craft nights, and more. Online resources such as popular magazines, audio books, streaming videos and music are also available, and offer the perfect complement to our more scholarly collections.

    Who: St. Catharines Public Library
    Where: Matheson Learning Commons (Library main floor)
    When: Tuesday, September 20, 12-4 pm.

    Who: Thorold Public Library
    Where:
    Matheson Learning Commons (Library main floor)
    When:
     Thursday, September 22, 1:30-3:30. 

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  • Employment Opportunity

    Brock University Library is accepting applications for the position of Circulation Assistant in our User Services & Engagement (formerly Access Services) department.

    The incumbent will assist students, faculty, staff, community members and other visitors in locating, using and borrowing material. Maintains library collections in good order and condition and facilitates their use. Maintains and updates records relating to library users and collections. Monitors bookings for the group study rooms. Depending on departmental needs, the incumbent will work a variety of days/shifts including day, evening, weekend and/or holiday.

    Learn more about the role, qualifications, salary, etc. and apply by September 13 at 12:01 am

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  • Brock Library services and resources highlighted in new exhibit

    New and returning students are invited to stop by and view a new exhibit in the Library and Learning Commons display cases. The exhibit features unique items from Brock’s Archives and Special Collections, the Makerspace, and Map, Data & GIS Library. A guide to study spots, research basics, and the various ways to get help from the library are also featured.  Welcome to Brock University Library runs to Friday, September 16.

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    Categories: Archives, Learning Commons, Main, Makerspace, MDGL

  • Welcome and welcome back!

    A new term and a fresh start, welcome to Brock and the Library.

    Whether you are a new or returning student or instructor, learn something new on the Discover Your Library page. Complete our popular Scholar Style quiz and receive customized services based on your answers.

    We look forward to working with you and wish you all the best for a successful term.

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  • Join our team as a Circulation Clerk

    Brock University Library is recruiting for two Circulation Clerks for the User Services & Engagement department.

    The Circulation Clerk in User Services & Engagement is responsible for assisting users with locating, using and borrowing material and providing basic copying and printing services to all users at the Ask Us desk. Depending on departmental needs, the Circulation Clerk may work a variety of days/shifts including day, evening, weekend and/or holiday on an “on-call” temporary basis.

    Learn more about the role, qualifications, salary, etc. and apply by September 3 at 12:01 am

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  • Join our team as Head, Research Lifecycle Department

    Brock University Library invites applications for the full-time probationary position of Head, Research Lifecycle Department from qualified candidates who have experience with library services, resources, and tools in support of research at a post-secondary institution.

    The successful candidate will provide leadership and direction for the operations of Brock Library’s new Research Lifecycle Department. This new department came into effect on May 1, 2022 as part of the Library’s new organizational design. The Research Lifecycle Department is a researcher-centered department that provides support in areas such as data services, evidence synthesis support, scholarly communication, and digital scholarship. This department maintains the Map, Data, & GIS Library, and is composed of four librarians (including the head), two permanent staff members, and part-time student staff.

    Learn more about this opportunity and how to apply. Applications will be accepted until Monday, September 1 at 12:01AM

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  • Local nautical history highlighted in new exhibit

    Note: this post originally published by Jocelyn Titone in Seen & Heard.

    In anticipation of the 90th anniversary of the opening of the Fourth Welland Canal this August, Brock University Library Assistant Sue Sykes has created several exhibits in Library spaces that highlight some facts and history of the canals, their bridges and the ships that have passed through them.  Items were curated from Brock’s Archives and Special Collections, Archives Canada and Sykes’ own personal nautical collection. The Brock Makerspace helped create lithophanes of the Welland Canal flight locks. Items on display from her personal collection include a brass door stop and running lights from the Venitia steam yacht that was once owned by local shipping company Scott Misener Steamships; examples of shipping flags from marine carriers Algoma, Patterson and Great Lakes Towing; a model laker ship that travelled through the Welland Canal; a 1920s photo of the Port of Goderich filled with ships carrying grain; and an artifact from John A. Roebling, the Chief Engineer of the Niagara Falls railway bridge and the Brooklyn Bridge.

    The displays are located on the main floor of the Library in the Matheson Learning Commons near the Ask Us desk and in Thistle Hall next to the Library’s south entrance. Additional historical information on the Welland Canal can be found in several digital exhibits curated by Brock Archives and Special Collections: Building the Welland Ship Canal, The History of the Welland Canal — All four of Them, and The Welland Canal’s Bridges and Tunnels — The Solution to Traffic Jams for over 100 years. Ship schedules are tweeted daily by the St. Catharines Museum Twitter account, and can be found on the Great Lakes St. Lawrence Seaway System Bridge Status webpage.

     

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