Current projects

Learn more about the innovative research projects taking place within the Centre for Digital Humanities.

Eduproject monograph

EduProject

Researcher(s): David Hutchison
Status: Ongoing
Website: eduproject.org

EduProject is a knowledge mobilization portal for project-based learning (PBL). Coverage includes PBL at the elementary, secondary, and post-secondary levels. The EduProject.org website features: 1) monographs contributed by PBL practitioners and researchers; 2) a handbook that focuses on the early stages of project-based learning; 3) links to PBL professional development resources; 4) links to open access PBL research studies, cataloged by educational level; 5) a carefully selected playlist of PBL videos with discussion questions; and 6) an Amazon powered PBL bookstore. EduProject is supported by a Brock University Chancellor’s Chair for Teaching Excellence grant.

Z-axis Research

Researcher(s): Alex Christie (with Katie Tanigawa, Stephen Ross and Colin Jones; University of Victoria)
Status: Ongoing
Website: http://zaxis.uvic.ca/

Z-Axis research is a mapping project that uses warped 3D maps to interpret twentieth-century literature, rather than impose GIS-specific space on texts that predate digital mapping. This project’s z-axis method uses data from modernist novels to warp archival maps from the modern period in 3D. The results visualize the spatial experience of the modern city as represented by a given novel, considering marginal and incomplete perspectives on the ground, rather than top-down or totalizing views from above. This project has been developed in collaboration with the Modernist Versions Project (MVP), Implementing New Knowledge Environments (INKE), and Compute Canada, with support from the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council (SSHRC).

Pedagogy Toolkit

Researcher(s): Alex Christie
Status: Ongoing
Website: http://pedagogy-toolkit.org/

Pedagogy Toolkit is an open source and community-driven repository of teaching materials, community-authored guides to teaching with digital humanities tools, and open access syllabuses and a syllabus templating tool. The project applies an open source philosophy to course development, offering a platform for pedagogues to share, author, and develop digital activities and teaching platforms. The repository serves as a contact zone where tool developers and a range of humanities pedagogues can contribute their expertise. All content is free to use for any non-commercial purpose, including open source code for authoring teaching and project websites with no funds or technical expertise required. This project is powered by Jekyll and GitHub Pages. It was developed with external funding from the Association for the Computers and the Humanities (ACH).

The workers of Silicon Knights - Where did they go?

The workers of Silicon Knights — Where did they go?

Researcher(s): Jeff Boggs (with RAs Stephanie Murray & Dmitry Kyurlovich)
Status: Ongoing
Website: n/a

Prior to its bankruptcy in 2014, Silicon Knights was Niagara’s largest single employer of digital media workers. While some in the Niagara region view this as a tragedy, taking a long view suggests that this may not be the case. What do their geographical and occupational trajectories reveal about the competitiveness of Ontario’s video game economy? Tracking the geographical and occupational trajectories of its former workers provides a means of identifying which locations in the North American, and especially Ontario’s, video game industry attract, lose and retain these kinds of digital media workers. Methodologically, this work suggests novel ways to identify regional competitiveness in this industry by use of Linked-In data.

Image from https://www.flickr.com/photos/opensourceway/7496801912

Open Source Open Society

Researcher(s): Dr. Karen Louise Smith (Principal Investigator)
Status: Ongoing
Website: visit

Project Open Source Open Society aims to carry out participatory research with Mozilla, a global non-profit committed to the open web. The project explores the idea of open source software as a component of a society, which upholds our democratic ideals.

In 2017, a Mozilla Research Grant was awarded to explore the development of privacy add-ons as a tactic for advocacy and internet health. This strand of the project is called, Add-ons for Privacy: Open Source Advocacy Tactics for Internet Health and it will involve interviews with 30 add-on developers and other knowledgeable experts.  

The eQuality Project

Researcher(s): Dr. Karen Louise Smith (Collaborator)
Status: Ongoing
Website: equalityproject.ca

The eQuality Project is a 7-year SSHRC Partnership grant co-led by Valerie Steeves and Jane Bailey at the University of Ottawa. The project aims to contribute to digital economy policy, particularly in relation to the privacy and cyberbullying issues that youth may encounter. The project critically interrogates the economic models that compel youth to disclose data digitally and seeks to create innovative educational materials.

Digital History Narrative – HistorySpace

Researcher(s): Dr.John Bonnett
Status: Ongoing
Website: n/a

As illustrated in the top image, this scene represents the Complex Object, a construct in HistorySpace that will enable the modeler and user to change the shape and surface of a building to represent the following:  changes in the building’s age; changes in model version; and the relationship between the building and attribute data describing the building’s inhabitants.

The lower image represents the interface that users will use to construct Narrative Objects.  This project is currently under development, but will allow users to easily and intuitively create multi-media narratives in virtual worlds using drag-and-drop methods.

Augmented Reality Art – Datascapes

Researcher(s): Dr.John Bonnett
Status: Ongoing
Website: n/a

This project explores the use of Augmented Reality as a medium for landscape art and other forms of situated art.  Photos left show the art form as it was displayed in the Brock Traffic Circle during the Congress of 2014.

The project has since developed newer iterations that enable the placement of project art forms in smaller-scale spaces. The project, as conceived, allows artists to visualize and sonify data and then situate the resulting materials as art works for placement in spatial spaces.

Ongoing, the team is working to generate software that will support the situation of artworks in landscapes, seascapes and skyscapes.

The Game Education Matrix (GEM) Beta

View the ONCAT presentation form Jason Hawreliak and Andrew Hogue about facilitating pathways in Post‐Secondary games education.

5th Annual Digital Pedagogy Institute Conference

A partnership between Brock University, the University of Guelph, the University of Waterloo and the University of Toronto Scarborough, the two day conference program covers Thursday August 9, 2018 – Friday August 10, 2018.