Dean’s message archive

” … if you work hard and intelligently you should be able to detect when a man is talking rot, and that, in my view, is the main, if not the sole, purpose of education.”
John Alexander Smith (1863-1939)

John Alexander Smith was the Jowett Lecturer of philosophy at Balliol College, Oxford when he said this about the value of education, and it is just as true today about an education in the Humanities as it ever was.

The disciplines that comprise the Humanities, that examine and interpret the human experience, are exactly those that lead us to question and doubt; and questioning and doubting are the activities that allow us to recognize “rot” when we hear it, and to differentiate the true from the false.  And along the way these disciplines guide us toward understanding our place and function in the cosmos – or at least questioning what we’re told about that place and function.

But isn’t this a luxury in these dangerous days?  Should we not focus our attention and activities on enterprises that offer a tangible and measurable “return on investment”, and leave the arts and humanities on the margins?

There are two answers to this: first, the Arts and Humanities do indeed offer an impressive return on investment; they offer the opportunities for the human spirit to expand and engage, and lead to healthier and happier communities.  In terms of education, studying the Arts and Humanities also provides for a great future: arts and culture is the fastest growing sector of the Canadian economy, so graduates in these fields have many opportunities to build successful careers.  And graduates in other Humanities disciplines do just as well: the employment rate for university graduates overall two years after graduation is over 90%, and the arts and humanities graduates are firmly in that range.

The second answer to the question about directing our attention and resources to more “profitable” endeavours is a question itself:  what are we making the money for?  Any acceptable answer to this leads us to discussing the human experience and what makes it valuable.

The Humanities are where the questions are asked, where the skills are gained, and where the future is made worth living in and for.  And Brock is where the Humanities flourish.  We offer excellent researchers, enthusiastic instructors, fascinating courses, and exciting opportunities to explore the world as it was, is, and could be.

Join us at Brock Humanities: ask questions, detect “rot”, and create a future worth living in.

Carol U. Merriam, PhD
Dean, Faculty of Humanities

In ordinary life, there are things that are predictable, expected, and usual. But if you’re considering a university, it’s time to be extraordinary, and do the unexpected. In Brock Humanities, we specialize in the extraordinary.

We have extraordinary instructors, doing an excellent job teaching unexpected things. Want to learn about cross-dressing pirates, or how to fire a musket from 1812? Pursue your creative work in the best and newest fine and performing arts facility in Canada? Engage with the migrant worker community?  Learn a language (or several!), living or dead? These are all part of the educational experience in Brock Humanities.

We have extraordinary researchers, extending the limits of knowledge in some fascinating areas. Vikings? Gladiators? The world experts on these research at Brock. We have active practitioners in the fine and performing arts, specialists in literature and philosophy of different eras and areas. All of them are active scholars, bring their research to the classroom, and involve students in their discoveries.

And we provide an extraordinary student experience. The extracurricular activities, groups, and clubs homed in Brock Humanities offer a wide variety of experiences, and are active in both the Brock community and the broader community. Here are a few examples: The French Club took a trip to Montreal; the Historical Society started publication of a student-run journal of historical writing; and the Brock University Archaeological Society (the Classics club) organizes an annual scholarly symposium. And these are just a few of the activities based in Humanities.

We also have regular study-abroad opportunities, that bring together instruction, research, and student experience, for a one-of-a-kind chance to see the world.

Many things are expected in life, and are considered ordinary.

Do the unexpected; be extraordinary: choose Brock, and choose Humanities. You will never regret it!

Carol U. Merriam, PhD
Dean, Faculty of Humanities

Congratulations on finding the home page of the Faculty of Humanities of Brock University!

Two basic questions always arise when anyone considers the Humanities: 1) What are Humanities? and 2) What are they good for?

The Humanities comprise the exploration of the human experience, on the experiences of individuals in the world; they are the examination of life. This exploration is effected through practice and study in art, music, and drama, and through the study of literature, history, languages, and thought.

At Brock, this exploration is done through the teaching and research carried out in the Departments of Visual Arts, Music, Dramatic Arts, English, Classics, History, Modern Languages, Literatures and Cultures, and Philosophy, as well as the Centres for Digital Humanities, Studies in Arts and Culture, and Mediaeval and Renaissance Studies.

What are the Humanities good for? They’re good for the expansion of your mind and your experience, your horizons and your very world. Through studying Humanities, you’ll become the person who asks the (often annoying) questions, and the person who strives to understand human life, thought, and emotion. By asking the questions and searching for the answers, you’ll be able to comprehend and contribute to the progress of humanity.

And on the way, you’ll become an intellectual powerhouse: you’ll develop skills in language, argument, persuasion, analysis, and interpretation. You’ll be ready to cope with any challenge the world throws at you.

By now you’re saying, “That sounds great, but I want a job after graduation.” And you’ll have that, too. Study after study, survey after survey show that students of the Arts and Humanities have the skills that employers are looking for, and are getting hired. Employers view communication skills (98%), having a positive attitude (97%) and teamwork skills (92%) as being important or very important when hiring for entry-level positions. (Source:Millennial Branding Student Employment Gap Study, Millennial Branding Group, May 2012)

It’s common knowledge that an education in the Arts and Humanities, besides leading to a more meaningful life, can also help in the search for meaningful employment. Here’s a sampling of recent stories:

Employers in Canada want people with the skills Humanities students develop: http://www.theglobeandmail.com/news/national/education/education-lab/as-canada-pushes-job-ready-skills-the-rest-of-the-world-embraces-liberal-arts/article18492798/

Graduates with any degree are employed at a rate of 90% or higher within two years of graduation: http://cou.on.ca/reports/university-works-2015/

The Humanities can make someone a better doctor: http://www.theglobeandmail.com/life/health-and-fitness/health/how-arts-education-can-help-create-better-doctors/article25802902/

and are absolutely essential to the ever-growing tech industry: http://www.forbes.com/sites/georgeanders/2015/07/29/liberal-arts-degree-tech/

In the end, employers don’t care what your major is, as long as you’re passionate about it and can talk about it (and anything else) in an articulate way: http://chronicle.com/article/If-Students-Are-Smart/230307/

So, what are the Humanities good for? They give you the chance to learn how to think, how to speak, how to work, and how to be human. Make the most of the chance:  join us in Humanities at Brock!

Carol U. Merriam, PhD
Interim Dean
Faculty of Humanities

“Science and technology can help you build a remote controlled killer robot; only the Humanities can help you figure why that could be a bad idea.”

The presence of a Faculty of Humanities, along with the research and teaching programmes included within it, constitutes the very basis of a university.  The exploration and analysis of the experience of being human constitute both the tradition of the university, and its future.

But not just the university’s future:  the pursuit of an education in the Humanities has a direct impact on your future:  Humanities students spend their university careers acquiring all of the traits that employers repeatedly say they are looking for:   proficiency in critical thinking and creative problem solving; effective communication skills such as reading, speaking, and writing; training in research, synthesis, and analysis of information; and opportunities for hands-on application in the world.

And so, while some will suggest that spending your university years studying the Humanities disciplines is a waste because it does not prepare you for a specific job, I would suggest the exact opposite:  spending your university career, your one unique chance for personal and intellectual growth, on preparation for your first job, is a colossal waste of your very precious time.  Instead, prepare yourself for your entire life:  study Humanities.

And do it at Brock!  Here we offer you the chance to explore interactive digital media, ancient Greek and Roman culture, creative writing, European languages, Eastern philosophy, literature, history, and the fine and performing arts.  We have excellent professors who will involve you in their own exciting intellectual adventures.  And we have Brock’s famous seminar system, where you join your fellow students in small groups to discuss the topics arising from your lectures.  The seminar system, especially, allows you develop your skills in analysis and communication – we often hear from employers, and from professors in the graduate programmes which our students attend after Brock, that our graduates have the ability and the confidence to speak up for themselves, to present their ideas, and to persuade their colleagues.

Brock’s Faculty of Humanities waits to show you the world, and will give you the chance to change the world.  Join us!

Carol U. Merriam, PhD
Interim Dean
Faculty of Humanities