Articles tagged with: Dolana Mogadime

  • Education professor continues family work to carry on Mandela legacy

    For Brock University’s Dolana Mogadime, educating others on Nelson Mandela’s legacy is more than just part of her job. It’s in her blood.

    Originally from South Africa, the Associate Professor in Brock’s Faculty of Education came to Canada at the age of seven. Her great-grandfather, Henry Selby Msimang, was a founding member of a political group that became the African National Congress, later led by Mandela. Her mother, Caroline Goodie Mogadime, was recognized by the Canadian Museum for Human Rights (CMHR) for her contributions to Canada’s anti-apartheid movement.

    On Thursday, July 18, the world will celebrate the 101st birthday of Mandela, a global icon of peace and equality who played a central role in ending apartheid in South Africa. This year’s Nelson Mandela International Day also marks the beginning of the Nelson Mandela Decade of Peace, as declared by the United Nations.

    Dolana Mogadime, Associate Professor in Brock University’s Faculty of Education

    Dolana Mogadime has been working with the CMHR in Winnipeg to honour Mandela’s goals for human rights education through several projects connected to the exhibition Mandela: Struggle for Freedom, which opened last year. Mogadime is the CMHR’s inaugural Visiting Scholar and contributed to the development of a series of new educational materials for teachers and students who visit the exhibition.

    “For myself as a person, I think it’s about going full circle,” Mogadime said of her work with CMHR. “It is about being born in a country and leaving, like many other immigrants do, to come to Canada as a dream of a nation where we can be fully human as we were denied in our own countries.”

    The CMHR’s approach to this work was inspired by a 2017 report prepared by Brock’s Human Rights Task Force, which made recommendations to promote and protect human rights at Brock and create a culture that is safe, welcoming and inclusive.

    Earlier this year, the University signed a Memorandum of Understanding to formalize its collaboration with the CMHR.

    Brock President Gervan Fearon said the efforts of Nelson Mandela and others like him shaped the world as we now know it.

    “Across the world, we celebrate the freedom and opportunities available while acknowledging there is still work to be done and efforts needed to maintain progress previously achieved,” Fearon said. “Nelson Mandela International Day reminds us to seek opportunities to contribute to positive change for the advancement of human dignity, equity and development as well as to address the human conditions of those imprisoned. I believe we can all find common ground in promoting and taking action in support of these themes.”

    Fearon applauded Mogadime’s work with the CMHR.

    “It’s a good example of how Brock University faculty and staff are taking important steps toward building a Canada and world that reflects the principles of Nelson Mandela International Day.”

    In addition to the educational materials prepared for the Winnipeg museum, Ontario children and teachers will also benefit from self-guided programs and teacher guides when the exhibition comes to Toronto’s Meridian Arts Centre (formerly the Toronto Centre for the Arts) from October to January. The exhibition offers a sensory experience of imagery, soundscape, digital media and objects, including a replica of Mandela’s tiny prison cell that transforms into a digital theatre when visitors walk inside.

    “The materials provide a way to anchor students’ thinking and a way to respond to what they’re emotionally going through as they’re visiting the exhibition,” said Mogadime. “We needed to be able to guide students through that.”

    The educational materials provide a way for teachers to prepare students and guide them through challenging conversations.

    “Like Mandela, we believe education is the most powerful weapon you can use to change the world for the better,” said CMHR President and CEO John Young. “We are pleased to have had this opportunity to work with Professor Mogadime and Brock University to add value for teachers and students who will experience this powerful exhibition as it begins travelling to new venues this fall.”

    In addition to the exhibits, the museum and Mogadime plan to bring lessons about Mandela’s legacy to classrooms across Canada through resources for educators. Working with a Teaching Nelson Mandela advisory committee at Brock, Mogadime is developing curriculum materials for Grades 2 to 12.

    She believes all students should learn about people like Mandela who have struggled to further human rights around the world.

    “Once you engage with and understand the human story about human rights, you can understand your own story and your own rights,” she said, pointing out that South Africa’s story parallels Canada’s history of colonialism and the oppression of Indigenous peoples.

    Anneke McCabe, a member of the Teaching Nelson Mandela advisory committee at Brock, said she hopes the curriculum materials help students see the value in becoming defenders of human rights.

    “I hope the learning experiences through the exhibition and the lessons guide students to become critical thinkers who are curious about what they can do to make a change,” said McCabe, an elementary school teacher and PhD candidate in Educational Studies at Brock.

    The advisory committee includes Mogadime (Chair), Anneke McCabe (Senior Advisory Member), William Ankomah, Zach Rondinelli, Sheri Lehn, Craig Marlatt, Lyn Trudeau, Rachel Urovitz, Liz Walmsley, Anver Saloojee, Yvan Brochu, Sally Hooper and Oscar Koopman.

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  • Event gallery: Research Symposium explores visual and cultural identity in North American adolescents

    Members of the Brock community recently gathered to discuss social media, beauty ideals and visual and cultural identities in adolescents during a research symposium organized by Fiona Blaikie, a Professor in the Department of Educational Studies. Blaikie’s recent research has focused on youth visual and cultural identity constructions and the need for these to be explored in art education.

    The symposium, “Impression Management: Constructions of Visual and Cultural Identities,” was held in Pond Inlet on Friday, Feb. 1, 2019. The day included two discussion panels, with speakers also giving brief presentations on their work around the theme of youth identity construction. The discussions were moderated by Dolana Mogadime, Associate Professor in the Department of Educational Studies. The welcoming ceremony was officiated by Nicholas Printup, a media and communications student at Brock University and member of the Beaver Clan, Six Nations of the Grand River, and the Kitigan Zibi Anishinabeg First Nation.

    . The speakers included:

    • Olga Ivashkevich, Associate Professor, School of Art and Design at the University of South Carolina: Beyond “Bad” Bodies: Adjudicated Girls Perform Experimental Digital Narratives to Resist Criminalization
    • Dónal O’Donoghue, Professor, Faculty of Education at the University of British Columbia: Becoming Somebody in Boys’ Schools
    • Michelle Bae-Dimitriadis, Assistant Professor in the School of Visual Arts, Pennsylvania State University: Decolonial Body Politics: Asian Refugee Girls’ Webtune Anime as Anti-White Privilege
    • Jennifer Rowsell, Professor and Canada Research Chair in Multiliteracies in the Faculty of Education at Brock University: Feeling with Materials: Analyzing Young People’s Affect-Driven Maker Practices
    • Kevin Gosine, Associate Professor of Sociology at Brock University: Reconciling Divergent Worlds in the Lives of Marginalized Youth
    • Shauna Pomerantz, Associate Professor in the Department of Child and Youth Studies at Brock University: ‘It’s my Lifeblood’, or Why Do We Disparage What Girls Value Most in Their Construction of Self?
    • Fiona Blaikie, Professor, Art Education, Faculty of Education at Brock University: Embodied, Constructed and Performed Youth Identities in Relation to Global Celebrity Influencers, Popular Culture, Social Media and Intersectionality: Dreaming the Impossible Dream.

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  • Special Issue of Brock Education: A Journal of Educational Research and Practice

    The latest Special Issue of Brock Education: A Journal of Educational Research and Practice is now available.

    The special issue, “Aesthetic Interventions: Implications for Social Justice through Art and Performance,” was co-edited by two guest editors:

    • Barbara McNeil, Associate Professor, Language and Literacy Education, University of Regina
    • Spy Dénommé-Welch, Associate Professor, Faculty of Education, Brock University

    This special issue brings together a collection of diverse voices, critical perspectives, and topics, which examine notions of aesthetics, art interventions, and implications for social justice issues and education. The essays contained in this issue represent a rich interplay of theory, practice, and criticism, creating a form of cross-disciplinary response that invite new approaches to investigate aesthetic education.

    The guest editors were supported by Editor-in-Chief, Dolana Mogadime, and the Brock Education Journal’s technical team throughout the process of producing the special issue.  The Brock Education Journal’s technical team includes William Ankomah, Tim Ribaric, Peter Vietgen and James Windjack. Dénommé-Welch and McNeil would also like to thank the reviewers for contributing their time and expertise to the special issue.

    Brock Education Journal
    Vol 28, No 1 (2018)
    Table of Contents:
    https://journals.library.brocku.ca/brocked/index.php/home

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  • Symposium to explore youth visual and cultural identity

    Whether it’s Instagram, Snapchat or another popular platform, social media has the ability to impact the way teens see themselves and how they form their own identity.

    This concept, as well as others surrounding social media, beauty ideals and visual and cultural identities in adolescents, will be discussed at a research symposium taking place at Brock on Friday, Feb. 1.

    Impression Management: Constructions of Visual and Cultural Identities in North American Adolescents brings together researchers from several institutions and disciplines. Held from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. at Pond Inlet, the event is open to all members of the Brock community.

    Two discussion panels will be held throughout the day, with speakers also giving brief presentations on their work around the theme of youth identity construction.

    “Identity is a key issue across disciplines because it is contested and difficult to navigate. Asserting identity raises issues of class, gender, sexuality, race, ethnicity, religion and politics,” says Faculty of Education Professor and event organizer Fiona Blaikie.

    Her recent research has focused on youth visual and cultural identity constructions and the need for these to be explored in art education.

    “Identity is a particularly problematic issue in high schools as adolescents begin to establish their sense of self,” says Blaikie. This process shapes youth as individuals and impacts the social ecosystem of schools.

    “Studies of high school identities reveal various manifestations of power and agency within subcultures, as well as bullying and exclusion,” explains Blaikie.

    The role of technology, celebrity culture and social media on identity construction will also be explored during the symposium.

    Many forms of identity construction as well as the impact of celebrity and pop culture influencers are realized via social media, including Instagram, Snapchat and blogs.

    Blaikie is currently leading a research project that focuses on visual and cultural identities and beauty ideals in adolescents, encompassing intersectionality and visual art self-creations and constructions through social media and art making.

    Symposium speakers include:

    • Olga Ivashkevich, Associate Professor, School of Art and Design at the University of South Carolina: Beyond “Bad” Bodies: Adjudicated Girls Perform Experimental Digital Narratives to Resist Criminalization
    • Dónal O’Donoghue, Professor, Faculty of Education at the University of British Columbia: Becoming Somebody in Boys’ Schools
    • Michelle Bae-Dimitriadis, Assistant Professor in the School of Visual Arts, Pennsylvania State University: Decolonial Body Politics: Asian Refugee Girls’ Webtune Anime as Anti-White Privilege
    • Jennifer Rowsell, Professor and Canada Research Chair in Multiliteracies in the Faculty of Education at Brock University: Feeling with Materials: Analyzing Young People’s Affect-Driven Maker Practices
    • Kevin Gosine, Associate Professor of Sociology at Brock University: Reconciling Divergent Worlds in the Lives of Marginalized Youth
    • Shauna Pomerantz, Associate Professor in the Department of Child and Youth Studies at Brock University: ‘It’s my Lifeblood’, or Why Do We Disparage What Girls Value Most in Their Construction of Self?
    • Fiona Blaikie, Professor, Art Education, Faculty of Education at Brock University: Embodied, Constructed and Performed Youth Identities in Relation to Global Celebrity Influencers, Popular Culture, Social Media and Intersectionality: Dreaming the Impossible Dream.

    The discussions will be moderated by Dolana Mogadime, Associate Professor in Brock’s Faculty of Education. Mogadime’s scholarship resides in the arenas of ethnographic, auto-ethnographic and narrative inquiry. She focuses on social justice and intersectionality, particularly around issues of race, gender and class.

    Refreshments and lunch will be provided at the symposium. Members of local school boards have also been invited.

    Capacity for the event is limited and registration is required by Thursday, Jan. 24 for catering purposes. For more details on the day’s speakers and to register for the event, visit the Faculty of Education website.

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  • FOE prof shares family history at Canadian Museum for Human Rights

    Perseverance runs deep in Dolana Mogadime’s family.

    Her mother was a teacher and her father a doctor. In other places at other times, their careers would have provided a comfortable life for their children. In Apartheid-era South Africa, their race made them targets of systemic discrimination.

    From 1948 to 1994, black South Africans, along with people of other races, were oppressed by a series of laws privileging white South Africans.

    Mogadime, an associate professor in Brock’s Faculty of Education, recently shared some of her family’s experience at the opening of Mandela: Struggle for Freedom at the Canadian Museum for Human Rights (CMHR) in Winnipeg. The exhibition explores the fight against Apartheid, from the legacy of Nelson Mandela to the efforts of human rights activists in Canada.Read more

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