Ethnic and cultural diversities

Ethnic and cultural diversities

 

imageleft

Ethnic and cultural diversities I: Histories of representation in Canadian theatre, by Naila Keleta-Mae, associate professor, University of Waterloo 

In this video, Naila traces the high-stakes reality of storytelling as it relates to history. She argues that what some may take as the norm for theatre in Canada—a group of people performing in front of an audience of silent observers—is actually an inheritance of the settler-invader reality of ‘Canadian’ histories. She reminds us to pay attention, when we go to the theatre, to exactly whose stories are being told and whose stories are being omitted.
imageleft
Ethnic and cultural diversities II: Representation in contemporary Canadian theatre, by Naila Keleta-Mae, associate professor, University of Waterloo
 
Naila invites us to explore three plays as a way of engaging contemporary diversities in Canadian theatre: Where the Blood Mixes by Kevin Loring; Angélique by Lorena Gale; and Yichud by Julie Tepperman. Each of these texts approaches human difference in nuanced and meaningful ways that underscore the urgency and importance of dealing with such difference in an ethical and egalitarian way.
imageleft
Ethnic and cultural diversities III: ‘Project Other’, by Nina Lee Aquino, artistic director of Factory Theatre
 
Nina tells the story of the development of her ‘Project Other’, initially undertaken at Humber College, and then at the National Theatre School, where students are asked to play characters of different ethnic and cultural backgrounds than their own. The complexities of appropriation versus the sensitive portrayal of cultural difference are discussed and practical solutions to thorny issues of representing ‘otherness’ are proposed.
 
imageleft
Ethnic and cultural diversities IV: Decolonizing movement: emerging paradigms & reconstruction, by Michael Greyeyes, associate professor and graduate program director of the MFA in acting at York University, and the artistic director of Signal Theatre.
 
In this video, Michael examines the supposed ‘neutrality’ of a variety of Euro-American body training forms such as ballet, and proposes that movement training itself has been colonized by such inherited forms. He explores and argues for the possibilities of indigenous of movement practices to enable the decolonization of the body.