SNAP Home Workouts

SNAP from Home is our way of keeping you connected with all the upsides of SNAP and for you to collaborate with us to make our ‘from home’ programming more relevant and useful for you.

Our overarching movement strategies of embedding fundamental movement patterns, task breakdown and distributed practice can be done from home and we are excited to support you as we take SNAP into a next level of community engagement.

Message from Maureen:
Context and pedagogy

Message from Elyse:
Safety considerations

Message from Demi:
The purpose of this page

Tips & Safety for Home Exercise

Do what “works” for your own body, you do not have to look exactly like the person you are watching in the videos.

Wear appropriate footwear – running shoes are best if sensory considerations allow.

Proper shoes can provide support and cushioning and help prevent injuries due to slips and trips.

Clothing should be comfortable and loose fitting to allow for proper range of motion.

If you are indoors, bare feet are safer than socked feet.

ENVIRONMENT

Check your surroundings to ensure you have enough space to move without bumping into anything.

You should also consider the temperature – as you start working out, your body temperature rises. Consider reducing the temperature in your house or opening some windows (so you can also get some fresh air).

If you have trouble regulating you body temperature (i.e., those with multiple sclerosis and spinal cord injury), then you may want to take even further precaution. For example, have a fan beside you when you exercise and consider spraying your body with cool water while you exercise.

 

Water is the best drink for your body during exercise.

Drink water without sugars or caffeine, before, during and after exercise.

It’s also a good idea to have a little snack about 20-30 minutes before your workout – for example, a banana, yogurt, some nuts, or a little bit of cheese are all great options.

Stop exercise immediately if you feel faint, lightheaded/dizzy or ill. Have a seat and drink some water.

If you continue to not feel well, seek medical attention.

If you experience any chest pain or discomfort or shortness of breath at any time, seek medical attention immediately.

For those with spinal cord injury, a pounding headache and severe sweating can be a sign of autonomic dysreflexia, and that your blood pressure is getting too high. Immediately stop exercising, make sure any irritating stimuli are removed (empty your bladder, loosen any tight clothing, etc.) and monitor your symptoms. If they don’t resolve shortly, call 911.

Make sure when you exercise to keep breathing. Sometimes we tend to hold our breath.

Be sure to dress appropriately for the weather (think about dressing in layers).

When engaged in outdoor activity, be sure to comply with physical distancing and maintain a distance of one-two metres (three-six feet) from those around you.

Session 3 activities

Body Management Activities

Body management skills are developed to assist with activities of daily life and safety. These activities focus on skills such as balance loss and regain, weight transfer, and fall control.

Gross Motor Activities

Gross motor activities engage large muscles within the body resulting in consistent neuromuscular involvement. These movements expend a greater amount of energy leading to fatigue which often results in improved sleep patterns. As well, gross motor activity has also been shown to stimulate more focused cognitive learning and more manageable social skills programming (Connolly, 2008).

Fitness Activities

Fitness and conditioning activities are important for strength and endurance development. These activities are designed to increase mobility and overall health and wellbeing.

Game Skills

Game skills focus on manipulative skills such as sending, receiving, striking, and retaining. These skills are important in every day life tasks such as: carrying dishes to the sink, throwing clothes into the laundry, picking up and throwing out garbage, and many more!

Sensory and Fine Motor Activities

Fine motor activities assist with object manipulation tasks that have transfer to everyday life (i.e. tying shoes, holding a food or writing utensil, doing up buttons, etc.)

Body Management Activities

Body management skills are developed to assist with activities of daily life and safety. These activities focus on skills such as balance loss and regain, weight transfer, and fall control.

Gross Motor Activities

Gross motor activities engage large muscles within the body resulting in consistent neuromuscular involvement. These movements expend a greater amount of energy leading to fatigue which often results in improved sleep patterns. As well, gross motor activity has also been shown to stimulate more focused cognitive learning and more manageable social skills programming (Connolly, 2008).

Fitness Activities

Fitness and conditioning activities are important for strength and endurance development. These activities are designed to increase mobility and overall health and wellbeing.

Game Skills

Game skills focus on manipulative skills such as sending, receiving, striking, and retaining. These skills are important in every day life tasks such as: carrying dishes to the sink, throwing clothes into the laundry, picking up and throwing out garbage, and many more!

Sensory and Fine Motor Activities

Fine motor activities assist with object manipulation tasks that have transfer to everyday life (i.e. tying shoes, holding a food or writing utensil, doing up buttons, etc.)

Body Management Activities

Body management skills are developed to assist with activities of daily life and safety. These activities focus on skills such as balance loss and regain, weight transfer, and fall control.

Gross Motor Activities

Gross motor activities engage large muscles within the body resulting in consistent neuromuscular involvement. These movements expend a greater amount of energy leading to fatigue which often results in improved sleep patterns. As well, gross motor activity has also been shown to stimulate more focused cognitive learning and more manageable social skills programming (Connolly, 2008).

Fitness Activities

Fitness and conditioning activities are important for strength and endurance development. These activities are designed to increase mobility and overall health and wellbeing.

Game Skills

Game skills focus on manipulative skills such as sending, receiving, striking, and retaining. These skills are important in every day life tasks such as: carrying dishes to the sink, throwing clothes into the laundry, picking up and throwing out garbage, and many more!

Sensory and Fine Motor Activities

Fine motor activities assist with object manipulation tasks that have transfer to everyday life (i.e. tying shoes, holding a food or writing utensil, doing up buttons, etc.)

Martial arts

AT HOME GENTLE TAI CHI ACTIVITY

AT HOME MARTIAL ARTS (WARM-UP)

AT HOME MARTIAL ARTS (UPPER BODY)

AT HOME MARTIAL ARTS (KICKS)

Contact Us

snap@brocku.ca

Elyse Lappano
Experiential Learning Coordinator, Inclusive & Adaptive Physical Activity

Demi Toms
Inclusive & Adaptive Physical Activity Specialist