Jae Patterson, PhD

Associate Professor, Kinesiology

Jae Patterson

Office: WC 250
905 688 5550 x3769
jae.patterson@brocku.ca

My specific research questions are focused on examining practice factors facilitating motor skill acquisition across the lifespan. Such general topics include knowledge of results, observational learning, repetition scheduling, self-controlled practice contexts and subjective error-detection accuracy. I completed my PhD in 2005 at McMaster University under the supervision of Dr. Timothy Lee; my Master’s Degree in 1996 in Human Kinetics at the  University of Windsor under the supervision of Patti Weir; and my honors undergraduate degree in 1993 at Brock University in the Department of Physical Education

Current research in the Motor Skill Acquisition Laboratory are examining research questions related to:

  • Practice factors strengthening the error detection capabilities of the learner as a function of motor task complexity
  • Practiced contexts organized by a peer of similar or different skill levels of the learner;
  • Application of motor learning principles to tasks performed in everyday living (e.g., touch screen performance)
  • Member of the Canadian Society for Psychomotor Learning and Sport Psychology
  • Member of the North American Society for the Psychology of Sport and Physical Activity
  • Centre for Neuroscience, Brock University

Patterson, J.T., McRae, M., & Lai (2016). Accuracy of subjective performance appraisal is not modulated by the method used by the leaner during motor skill acquisition. Perceptual and Motor Skills, 122, 650-665.

Patterson, J.T., Hart, A., Hansen, S., Carter, M., & Ditor (2016). Measuring Investment in Learning: Can Electrocardiogram Provide an Indication of Cognitive Effort During Learning? Perceptual and Motor Skills, 122, 375-394.

McRae, M., Patterson, J.T., & Hansen, S. (2015). Examining the preferred self-controlled KR schedules of learners and peers during motor skill learning. Journal of Motor Behavior, 47, 527-534.

Weaver, TB., Adkin, A.L., Patterson, J.T.,& Tokuno, C. (2014). The influence of instructions on arm reactions in individuals with Parkinson’s disease. Human Movement Science, 37, 101-110.

McGuire, J., Green, L., Calder, K., Patterson, J., & Gabriel, D.A. (2014). The effects of massed versus distributed contractions on the variability of maximal isometric force. Experimental Brain Research, published online April 2nd, 2014.

Sanli, E., & Patterson, J. (2013). Learning effects of self-controlled practice scheduling for children and adults: Are the advantages different? Perceptual and Motor Skills, 116, 1-9.

Patterson, J.T., Carter, M., Hansen, S. (2013). Self-controlled KR schedules: Does repetition order matter? Human Movement Science. 32, 567-579.

Sanli, E.A., Patterson, J.T., Bray, S.R., Lee, T.D. (2013). Understanding self-controlled motor learning protocols through self-determination theory. Frontiers in Psychology: Movement Science and Sport Psychology, 3, 1-17.

Cote, P., Kimmerle, M., & Patterson J. (2013). Learning and transfer of dance sequences by novice and experienced dancers. Asian Journal of Exercise & Sports Science, 10, 98-106.

Carter, M*., & Patterson, J.T. (2012). Self-Controlled Knowledge of Results: Age Related Differences in Motor Learning, Strategies, and Error Detection. Human Movement Science, 31, 1459-1472.

Patterson, J.T., & Azizieh, J*. (2012). Knowing the good from the bad: does being aware of KR content matter? Human Movement Science, 31, 1449-1458.

Patterson, J.T., Carter, M*., & Sanli, L*. (2011). Decreasing the proportion of self-control trials during the acquisition period does not compromise the learning advantages in a self-controlled context. Research Quarterly for Exercise and Sport, 82, 624-63.

Hansen, S., Pfeiffer, J*., & Patterson, J.T. (2011). Self-control of feedback during motor learning: Accounting for the absolute amount of feedback using a yoked group with self control. Journal of Motor Behavior, 43, 113-121.

  • Foundations in Adapted Physical Education and Disability Studies
  • Motor Learning
  • Human Factors and Ergonomics
  • Internship in Kinesiology
  • Thesis / Project