What's New in Research

What's New in Research

 

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Brock biologist among editors of a new book on coastal zone management

July 30, 2015

With extreme weather occurring more and more regularly, floods, storms and rising sea levels are some of the threats coastal zones increasingly face.

Add destruction of mangroves and salt marshes because of land development, and you get major deterioration of whole coastal ecosystems, affecting millions of coast dwellers.

Brock biologist Liette Vasseur is among a half-dozen editors of the recently released book Coastal Zones: Developing Solutions for the 21st Century.

But the book does more than describe the many challenges with which scientists and policy makers have to grapple.

“The main point of the book was to bring together scientists from different places in the world and to see how they work on solutions for coastal zones,” Vasseur says. “What were the issues? What are these solutions? What can coastal communities do to address the many problems in coastal zones.”

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Brock research compares well-being in young and older populations

July 28, 2015

Stress.

Just hearing the word sends a jolt through us as we scramble to meet deadlines, pay the bills and face a host of other challenges. Many of us think we’ll be less stressed out in our golden years.

But is that the case? Graduate student Thalia Semplonius is aiming to find out.

Semplonius is seeking people 60 years and older to answer a range of questions that measure their sense of well-being.

“We want to know how they’re dealing with stress, and how social activities might help them manage stress,” says Semplonius. “What’s making them stressed? What’s making them happy?”

But there’s a twist to her research: Semplonius is using a similar questionnaire that a long-running Brock University study is using to examine stress levels and well-being in Brock undergraduate students.

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Brock prof pens book on Canada’s drug history

July 24, 2015

What did a drug user look like in 19th century Canada?

In his new book, When Good Drugs Go Bad, Opium, Medicine and the Origins of Canada’s Drug Laws, Brock University Associate Professor Dan Malleck reveals that most Canadians were drug users.

Opium and cocaine were commonly prescribed to treat a range of ailments, which often led to drug dependency. It wasn’t until the end of the century that attitudes shifted and access to drugs became more restricted.

In his second book, released this month by UBC Press, Malleck uses medical and pharmacy journals, newspaper accounts, physicians’ case books, pharmacy records, professional association files and asylum documents to show the connection between the increasing power of the medical and pharmacy professions and changes to Canada’s drug laws in the early 1900s.

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Brock researchers develop new method to detect dishonesty in police interviews

July 15, 2015

Have you ever wondered how law enforcement officers on television always seem to know which suspects are telling the truth and which ones are being deceitful? Unfortunately in reality, it’s not quite as easy or accurate as it may look on the screen.

Research shows that existing techniques to detect deception are only up to around 57 per cent accurate.

Brock psychology researchers Angela Book and graduate student Michael Logue have discovered a way to increase the ability to detect deception in interviews of suspects to 86 percent.

“Knowing how important honesty is in testimony, we have to do better,” explained Logue, who came up with the research idea. “My thought was simple: If we want to know if people are telling us the truth, we have to actually listen to what they’re saying.”

The research involved combining an interview technique called the “cognitive interview” with an already existing coding system called the Reality Monitoring Scale.

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Two Brock profs to hold high positions in Pan Am games

June 29, 2015

Brock University professors Nota Klentrou and Brian Roy are gearing up for their major roles in the upcoming Pan Am Games.

Kinesiology professor Klentrou, who is also associate dean in the Faculty of Applied Health Sciences, assumes the position of “Venue Results Manager” for all gymnastics competitions, to be held at the Ricoh Coliseum in the Exhibition Centre, Toronto.

Klentrou will oversee the scoring and results functions that involve several groups of people: technical delegates from the International Gymnastics Federation and the Pan American Gymnastics Union; judges; the information technology team, Atos; and volunteers.

“Volunteers sit next to the judges in each apparatus and compile all the judges’ scores,” she says. “I have to go through the scores and make sure that they make sense. Then I get approval from the technical delegation, oversee the printing of results and communicate the scores with announcer, the broadcasting crew and media.”

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Networking breakfast highlight’s healthcare’s potential in Niagara

June 29, 2015

Niagara has the potential to lead the province - possibly the world - in healthcare intiatives.

That was the consensus arrived at recently at the Life Sciences Ontario Knowledge Networking Breakfast, co-hosted by Brock University’s BioLinc and Niagara Economic Development.

The event featured a discussion about Niagara’s Healthcare ecosystem in which an international panel talked about improving health, life and the economy in Niagara. Panel members agreed that if entrepreneurs and policymakers take advantage of readily available or emerging technologies, work in collaboration with healthcare facilities, and engage the community to embrace the potential, it could result in huge opportunities for Niagara to be a provincial and global leader in healthcare initiatives.

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