Brock researchers part of drug study that could benefit lung cancer patients

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Brock researchers part of drug study that could benefit lung cancer patients

Published on May 07 2013


The diabetes drug metformin slows the growth of lung cancer cells and makes them more likely to be killed by radiotherapy, according to a paper published May 1 in the British Journal of Cancer.

“Our study was performed using human cancer cells in culture, in vitro,” says Evangelia Litsa Tsiani, associate professor in the Department of Community Health Sciences and one of the paper’s authors. “Overall our study provides strong evidence and justifies the need of a clinical trial, a study in lung cancer patients.”

Tsiani, along with her graduate student Carly Barron, were members of the McMaster-led team that examined the effects of metformin on tumor growth in mice. The team found that metformin acted on the defence mechanisms that the most common form of lung cancer - non-small cell lung cancers - use to resist radiotherapy.

When exposed to radiotherapy treatment, lung cancer cells become resistant to radiotherapy and can survive the treatment. The researchers used “real life” levels of the diabetes drug metformin in their experiments with cancer cells grown in the laboratory and in mice.
 

Read the rest of the story in the Brock News