"Focus on Five" archives

"Focus on Five" archives

Cathy van Ingen, physical cultural studies scholar, Department of Kinesiology: 1991 was a historic year for women who, for more than a century before, had donned padded gloves to duke it out in bars: amateur women’s boxing became legal. Read more.

Glenn Tattersall, biologist, Department of Biology: If an animal lives in a different environment from where it was raised, can its physiology adapt to that new environment, and if so, how quickly does that happen? Read more.

Marilyn Rose, Canadian literature specialist, Department of English Language & Literature: Have you ever read a novel where the characters were so real, so likeable, that you couldn’t help but wince when something tragic happened to them or cheer when they scored a victory? Read more.

Maxim Voronov, associate professor of strategic management, Goodman School of Business and Fellow, Cool Climate Oenology and Viticulture Institute (CCOVI): “Better do fewer things very well than do a lot of things rather so-and-so.” Read more.

Sheila Bennett, professor of education, Department of Teacher Education: Every child has a right to belong in every classroom; teachers must ensure that education is accessible for all. Read more.

Antonia Mantonakis, consumer psychologist, Department of Marketing, International Business & Strategy (MIBS); fellow, Cool Climate Oenology and Viticulture Institute (CCOVI): Read more.

Tamari Kitossa, sociologist, Department of Sociology: Read more.

Mary Breunig, environmental educator, Department of Recreation and Leisure Studies: Read more.

Elizabeth Sauer, English literary scholar, Department of English and Language and Literature: Read more.

Michael J. Armstrong, operations management associate professor, Goodman School of Business: Read more.

Tomas Hudlicky, chemist, Tier 1 Canada Research Chair in Biocatalysis, Department of Chemistry: Read more.

Tony Volk, developmental psychologist, Department of Child and Youth Studies: Read more.

Kendra Coulter, labour studies professor, Faculty of Social Sciences: Read more.

Charles Conteh, political scientist, Faculty of Social Sciences: Read more.

Ejaz Ahmed, statistician, Dean of Faculty of Mathematics and Science: Read more.

Thad Harroun, physicist, Department of Physics:  Read more.

Debbie Inglis, biochemist, director, Cool Climate Oenology and Viticulture Institute (CCOVI): Read more.

John Hay, pediatric exercise medicine specialist, Department of Community Health Sciences: Read more.

Jennifer Good, communication expert, Faculty of Social Sciences: Read more.

Voula Marinos, criminologist, Department of Child and Youth Studies: Read more.

Joyce Mgombelo, mathematics educator, Department of Teacher Education: Read more.

Martin Tammemagi, epidemiologist, Department of Community Health Sciences: Read More.

Bareket Falk, exercise physiologist, Department of Kinesiology: Read more.

Mariek Schmidt, volcanologist and igneous petrologist, Department of Earth Sciences: Read more.

David Fancy, scholar-artist, Department of Dramatic Arts: Read more.

Kevin Kee, Canada Research Chair in Digital Humanities, digital historian, Centre for Digital Humanities: Read more.

Janet Conway, Canada Research Chair in Social Justice, political scientist, Department of Sociology: Read more.

Paul Zelisko, organic chemist, Department of Chemistry: Read more.

Stephen Cheung, Canada Research Chair in Environmental Ergonomics, ergonomist, Department of Kinesiology: Read more.

Joe Norris, education dramatist, Department of Dramatic Arts: Read more.

Diane Dupont, environmental economist, Department of Economics: Read more.

Lisa Barrow, business consultant, Goodman School of Business: Read more.

Ana Sanchez, medical microbiologist, Department of Community Health Sciences: Read more.

Thomas Farrell, linguist and chair, Department of Applied Linguistics: Read more.

Jim Willwerth, staff viticulturist, Cool Climate Oenology and Viticulture Institute: Read more.

Photo of Glenn

Biologist Glenn Tattersall says researching if and how animals adapt their physiology in new environments can be crucial in assessing the impacts of climate change. “As biologists interested in charting whether animals are responding to climate change, we need easily measurable markers of whether they are responding or have been responding to changes in the environment around them.”