Faculty Handbook

Faculty Handbook

Section 3 : Academic Regulations

 

1. The Calendar Year

1.1 Calendar Dates


2. Admissions

2.1 Administration of Admissions Policy
2.2 Undergraduate Admissions Procedure
2.3 Standards for Admission
2.4 Categories of Admission
2.5 Proof of Proficiency in English


3. Registration

3.1 Registration and Course Changes

4. Withdrawals

4.1 Required Withdrawal
4.2 Formal Voluntary Withdrawal
4.3 Refund of Fees

5. Curriculum

5.1 General Regulations
5.2 Course Levels and Course Load
5.3 Academic Accommodations for Students with disabilities
5.4 Academic Organizational Nomenclature

6. Undergraduate Degree Program Requirements

6.1 Literacy in English and Numeracy
6.2 Distribution Requirement ("Core and Context")
6.3 (Deleted at Senate 576)
6.4 General Degree Requirements
6.5 Requirements for a Second Undergraduate Degree
6.6 Academic Regulations Pertaining to Certificate Programs
6.7 Types of Programs Offered
6.8 Pattern of Major Programs
6.9 Pattern of Combined Major Programs
6.10 Pattern of Integrated Studies Programs
6.11 Pattern of General Programs
6.12 Certificate Programs
6.13 Miscellaneous Degree Requirements
6.14 Awarding of a Posthumous Degree
6.15 Requirements re: Concentration
6.16 Requirements re: Minors

7. Departmental Program Requirements

7.1 Course Approval
7.2 Changes in Designation
7.3 Course Deletions
7.4 Approval of Departmental Offerings
7.5 Limits on Departmental Offerings
7.6 Required Courses
7.7 Course Cancellations
7.8 Cancellation of Classes
7.9 Program Approval
7.10 Limitation of Undergraduate Enrolments

8. Research Ethics

8.1 Statement of Principles of Research Ethics
8.2 Human Research Policy Statement 
8.3 Policy Statement: Animal Care and Use

9. Examination

9.1 General
9.2 Examinations
9.3 Progress (Midyear) Examinations - Full Credit Courses
9.4 Deferred Examinations
9.5 Challenges for Credit

10. Evaluation

10.1 Duties of the Instructor
10.2 Standards Applying to Letter Grades
10.3 System of Numerical Grades
10.4 Phrase Matching Software (e.g., Turnitin.com)
10.5 Academic Accommodation for Religious Obligations

11. Academic Standing

11.1 Cumulative Grade Average
11.2 Permission to Proceed
11.3 Course Levels (see FHB III: 5.2.1)
11.4 Requirements for Degrees/Certificates (See also FHB III: 6.7 - 6.11)
11.5 Repeating Courses
11.6 Honours Program
11.7 Notification of Intention to Graduate
11.8 Standing for Graduation
11.9 Withholding of Degree or Grades
11.10 Records, Transcripts and Diplomas
11.11 Filing of Bachelor's Thesis

12. Appeals

12.1 Preamble
12.2 Types of Appeals
12.3 Medical Appeals
12.4 Appeals Procedures

13. Part-time Studies

13.1 Regulations
13.2 Equivalence

14. Graduate Studies Academic Regulations

14.1 Establishment and Review of Graduate Programs
14.2 Graduate Student Rights and Responsibilities Policy
14.3 The Calendar Year
14.4 Graduate Calendar
14.5 Graduate Degrees
14.6 Admissions
14.7 Registration and Student Status
14.8 Examinations
14.9 Graduate Supervision, Exit Requirements and Thesis Defences
14.10 Evaluation
14.11 Graduate Appeals
14.12 Awarding of Posthumous Degree

15. Academic Misconduct

15.1 Preamble

16. Academic Computing and Communications Policies

16.1 Definitions of Academic Computing and Communications Resources
16.2 Functions of the Senate Committee on Information Technology and Infrastructure
16.3 Faculty Entitlement Resources
16.4 Student Entitlement to Resources
16.5 General Process for Validating Needs
16.6 General Process for Acquisition of Resources
16.7 Approval of Regulations Governing Use of Computing Resources

17. Discipline

17.1 University Committee on Student Discipline

18. Students Rights and Responsibilities

19. Awards

19.1 General Regulations
19.2 Financial Need
19.3 Brock Continuing Scholar Awards (Brock Returning Scholar Awards)
19.4 Medals
19.5 Dean's Honours List
19.6 Bursaries
19.7 Committee Procedures
19.8 Awards and Recognitions Listed on the Academic Transcript


20. Instutional Quality Assurance Processes (IQAP)

21. Approval of new Undergraduate Programs

21.1 Senate Authority
21.2 Approval Process
21.3 Required Documentation/Information for All New Programs

22. Postdoctoral Fellows

22.1 Brock Policy Regarding Postdoctoral Fellows

23. Ownership of Student-Created Intellectual Property

23.1 Ownership of Student Created Intellectual Property and Other Works as well as that Created by Research Assistants and Post Doctoral Fellows

24. Policy on Safety and Liability for Field Research

24.1 Preamble
24.2 Scope and Definition of Field Research
24.3 Concerned Parties
24.4 Requirements for Reasonable Care
24.5 Responsibilities
24.6 Other Policies and Procedures
24.7 Policy Implementation
24.8 Policy Review
24.9 Appendices

25 Policy on the Establishment and Review of Research Centres and Institutes

25.1 Preamble
25.2 Definitions
25.3 Process
25.4 Application Procedure
25.5 Review and Renewal
25.6 Appendix
 

26  Policy on Protecting Students as a Result of a Disruption of Academic Activities

26.1 Definitions
26.2 Providing Timely Information to Students
26.3 Protecting Students From Academic Penalty
26.4 Disruptions of Five or Fewer Working Days
26.5 Disruptions of More than Five Working Days
26.6 Extension of Course Withdrawal Deadline
26.7 Student Appeals
26.8 Maintenance of Services


 

Section III: Academic Regulations


1. The Calendar Year

1.1 Calendar Dates

A. Registration times and the first day of classes for each session shall be published annually by the Office of the Registrar.

B. The periods for Fall and Winter Term classes will be a full 12 weeks in length (structured so as to include 36 minimum contact hours per half credit and 72 minimum contact hours per full credit), with make-up days for class days lost to statutory holidays. The Winter Term will also include one day (a "snow day") at the end of the term which can be used to make up class time which has been lost because of inclement weather. Classes in the Fall Term will normally begin on the first Thursday following Labour Day. Classes in the Winter Term will normally begin on the Monday after New Year's Day. Classes in the Spring Session will normally begin on the second Monday of May.

Senate 341, 443, 499, 532

C. A Fall Term Break period shall be scheduled for the full week that includes Thanksgiving Monday.  Winter Term Reading Week shall commence on the sixth Sunday after the beginning of classes for the Winter Term, and shall continue for seven days until the seventh Sunday.

Senate 499, 616

D. Spring Convocations shall normally be held during the second week in June. Fall Convocation shall normally be held on the third Saturday in October.

Senate 438

E. University examination periods in Fall and Winter terms shall be preceded by a reading period of two days if possible, but at least one day, not including Sunday. The Fall and Winter examination periods shall normally consist of twelve or fewer examination days. Examinations shall not be scheduled on the Saturday of Easter weekend.

Senate 341, 460

F. Final examinations shall be scheduled on the Friday and Saturday following the conclusion of Spring session. Progress (mid-course) examinations in Year 1 courses and final examinations in first-term half credit courses offered in Spring session will be scheduled by the Office of the Registrar on the Friday and Saturday following the mid-point in the session (see III: 9.2). Final examinations for Summer session will be scheduled one day following the conclusion of that session.

G. Examination scripts shall be submitted to the Office of the Registrar seven working days prior to examinations in the Fall/Winter session; five working days in the Spring Session; and three working days in the Summer Session.

Senate 119, 131, 137, 271, 279, 283, 526

2. Admissions

2.1 Administration of Admissions Policy

2.1.1

The Undergraduate Student Affairs Committee is constituted to advise Senate on admission regulations, policies and academic standards. (see FHB II: 9.10).

Senate 589

2.1.2

The Office of the Registrar is responsible for the administration of the admissions policy of Senate.

[Senate 4, 388]

2.1.3

The Undergraduate Calendar, as reflecting the policies of the Undergraduate Student Affairs Committee and Senate, is the authority for admission to degree programs.

2.2 Undergraduate Admissions Procedure

2.2.1

Centralized undergraduate admission procedures, as approved by the Ontario Universities' Council on Admissions (OUCA) are:

a) the universities use a common application form, to be completed by applicants and forwarded by the Ontario Universities' Application Centre (OUAC) to the universities;

b) the universities will be free to ask applicants for additional information not on the common application form;

c) offers may be extended at any time during the application cycle as deemed appropriate by individual universities, as long as candidates receive an admissions decision no later than the common date announced annually by OUAC;

d) universities may require a candidate to formally accept an offer no later than a common response date announced annually by OUAC;

Senate 589

e) when a student confirms, through OUAC, an acceptance of an offer of admission, the other universities to which application has been made will be informed of this decision by OUAC.

Senate 20, 60, 137

2.2.2

Applicants for admission to a full-time undergraduate degree program must complete the appropriate OUAC application form. Applicants for admission to part-time study must complete the appropriate application for admission form which can be obtained from the Office of the Registrar. Every candidate is responsible for ensuring that high school transcripts and, where appropriate, official records of university and college work are sent to the Office of the Registrar by the institution or institutions involved. All of these records must indicate the marks earned in each subject. Candidates withholding or failing to provide information regarding previous university or college records, and/or submitting false documentation are liable to have their registrations cancelled.

Senate 589

Senate 31, 43, 136, 189, 222

2.3 Standards for Admission

2.3.1 General Requirement

Enrolment is limited in order that Brock students may benefit from the University's traditions of personal contact and individual attention. Applicants must be formally admitted to the University before they can register in degree credit courses.

Senate 60, 126, 136, 189, 277

2.3.2 Calculation of Admission Average

The admission average is the average of the best six Grade 12 University (U) and University/College (M) credits (including any program specific prerequisites) counted toward the Ontario Secondary School Diploma.

Senate 60, 308, 491

2.3.3 Equivalent Certificates

For applicants with qualifications from outside Ontario, the following certificates, which must give actual grades or marks obtained in each subject, are normally accepted as equivalent to the Ontario Secondary School Diploma which includes six Grade 12 University and University/College Courses:

a) Alberta, British Columbia, Manitoba, Newfoundland and Labrador, New Brunswick, Northwest Territories, Nova Scotia, Nunavut, Prince Edward Island, Saskatchewan, Yukon: Grade 12 senior matriculation with high standing.

Senate 589

b) Quebec: CEGEP General 1 (minimum of 12 academic courses), or Grade 12 with high standing. Advanced standing will be considered for applicants who have completed a two or three-year CEGEP program with high standing, to a maximum of five year one credits.

c) United States: Grade 12 diploma. For borderline cases, SAT scores are helpful in the evaluation process.

d) United Kingdom: Applicants will be considered for admission with the completion of 5 GCE/GCSE/IGCSE subjects with at least 2 at A-Level (GCSE grades at C or above). One GCSE/IGCSE/O-Level subject (grade C or above) and 4 AS-Level subjects will be considered provided the AS-levels do not duplicate subject matter at the GCSE/IGCSE or O-Level. In consultation with the appropriate academic department, the Office of the Registrar will consider transfer credit for those A-Level courses passed with a grade 'C' or better to a maximum of 3 credits. Transfer credit will not be considered for courses completed to AS-Level. Brock University will also consider applicants with VCE A-Level, VCE A-Level Double Award and BTEC Certificate/Diploma qualifications.

Applicants may also be considered for admission based on (1) the Cambridge Pre-U Diploma, or (2) a combination of Cambridge Pre-U Principal Subjects, Cambridge Pre-U Short Courses, A-Level Subjects and AS-Level Subjects. Pre-U Principal Subjects or Pre-U Short Courses with a minimum grade of Pass (P1) are required for admission to the University (admission is not guaranteed to specific programs by attainment of the minimum requirements as many programs require higher averages). Pre-U Principal Subjects and/or Pre-U Short Courses should be completed in the appropriate prerequisite subjects. In consultation with the appropriate academic department Pre-U Principal Subjects with a grade of Merit (M3) will be considered for advanced standing.

Senate 584

 e) East and West Africa, Hong Kong: the General Certificate of Education with passes in five subjects, of which at least two must be from distinct areas at the advanced level; or passes in four subjects, of which at least three must be from distinct areas at the advanced level. (Note the proficiency in English requirements.) In consultation with the appropriate academic department, the Registrar's Office will consider transfer credit for those advanced level courses passed with a grade of 'C' or better to a maximum of 3.0 credits.

f) Caribbean Territories: Applicants will be considered for admission with completion of the Caribbean Secondary Education Certificate (CSEC) as well as Caribbean Advanced Proficiency Examinations (CAPE) results. Applicants with passes in five subjects at the CSEC-Level (minimum grade 3), of which at least two subjects are completed to the CAPE Advanced Unit 2-Level (minimum grade 4) will be considered. Alternatively, one CSEC-Level subject (minimum grade 3) and four Unit 1-Level subjects (minimum grade 4) will be considered as long as the Unit 1-Level subjects do not duplicate the subject matter at the CSEC-Level. Prerequisite subjects required for entry to a specific degree program must be completed to Unit 1-Level with grades of no less than 4. In consultation with the appropriate academic department, the Office of the Registrar will consider transfer credit for those Unit 2-Level courses passed with a grade of '3' or better to a maximum of 3.0 credits.

g) International Baccalaureate Systems: Applicants who have successfully completed the IB Diploma with the appropriate prerequisite subjects will be considered for admission and may be awarded a maximum of 3.0 transfer credits for HL examinations completed at a minimum grade of 5.
Applicants, who successfully complete an IB Certificate program with a minimum of six subjects including prerequisites, may also be considered for admission and transfer credit.

h) Advanced Placement (AP) Program: Advanced Placement courses may be used to determine admissibility and also granting of transfer credit or exemption. Applicants who have completed Advanced Placement courses with a minimum grade of 4 may be eligible to receive university credit to a maximum of 2.0 Brock credits. An official AP transcript is required as part of the evaluation process.

i) Applicants from India, Pakistan and Bangladesh are considered for admission on the basis of:

1) Grade 12 secondary school standing with Division I or A standing

OR

2) First year of a recognized university program with transfer credit being awarded for appropriate courses.

All applicants must meet the minimum TOEFL requirements, or equivalent, for international students whose first language is not English.

Senate 222, 277, 308, 316, 329, 406, 438, 444, 466, 485, 491, 513, 553

2.3.4 Home Schooled Admissions Policy

Category A

Preference is given to home schooled applicants who, after the eleventh year of home-schooling, complete the final year of secondary studies in an Ontario Ministry of Education inspected school, and present six 4U or 4M Ontario Grade 12 advanced level credits, as well as evidence of 40 hours of community service.

Canadian out-of-province applicants with equivalent preparation in the home province will be given equal consideration.

Category B

All other home schooled applicants who do not fall into the above category will be reviewed on a case-by-case basis. Normally, admission is limited to Humanities General Studies, Social Sciences General Studies or Sciences General Studies. Upon successful completion of first-year studies at Brock University, applicants may apply to declare a specific major.

Senate 553

2.4 Categories of Admission

2.4.1 Regular Admission

A. Early Admission

Candidates about to complete the Ontario Secondary School Diploma with six Grade 12 University or University/College courses may, at the discretion of the Admissions Committee, be granted final admission prior to final grades being issued (subject to the agreed restrictions of the OUAC - see FHB III: 2.2.1).

Senate 14, 136, 189, 308

B. Minimum Average

Although 70 percent is the minimum acceptable average for admission to the University, a higher average will be required for most programs. Meeting the minimal requirements does not guarantee admission to either the University or a specific program.

Senate 277, 577

C. Applicants eligible for admission to Arts or Science shall be offered entry into an honours program if their admissions averages are 70 percent or greater.

Senate 374

D. All applicants for admission to a BEd Degree Program must hold an undergraduate degree acceptable to Brock University. Standing must meet the minimum acceptable level as defined by the Faculty of Education for the programs that are currently in effect and for which application is being made.

Senate 189, 222

2.4.2 Limited Admission

Applicants presenting an OSSD with six Grade 12 University and University/College Courses, with an average of less than 70 percent, or who lack one or more credits needed for the diploma, may be admitted upon the recommendation of the Undergraduate Student Affairs Committee, which will determine any conditions to be attached to an applicant's admission.

Senate 189, 222, 252, 277, 308, 491, 601

2.4.3 Other Admission Categories

A. Mature Admissions

Those who are not eligible for admission in any one of the categories listed above, who have been out of school for at least two years and who are at least 21 years old, may be considered for admission on a mature student basis.

Mature applicants selected for admission are normally limited to part-time study initially. They must achieve an overall average of at least 60 percent on their first two credits; otherwise, they will be placed on academic probation and limited to part-time status. In support of the application, students will be asked to submit official copies of all pertinent academic records. In addition, students may be asked to submit a letter outlining:

i) career ambitions

ii) why they may be successful at university

iii) why they may be successful at university

An interview may also be required.

Mature student admission is only applicable to Canadian citizens and landed immigrants.

Senate 375, 411, 466, 517

(2.4 B deleted at Senate 589)Senate 291, 308, 350, 589

B. Special Accessibility Admissions

Each year Brock University makes available a number of spaces for accessibility admission of Canadian citizens and landed immigrants who apply to the year one undergraduate program from a high school or community college, or the one year teach education program. This is to give special consideration to individuals from specified groups.

Year one undergraduate applicants who has achieved the minimum acceptable average for admission to the University, but whose academic record does not include the higher average required for their chosen program, may apply for consideration as a special student under the categories listed below.

Teacher education applicant who has met the minimum admissions requirements, including the completion of a bachelor's degree acceptable to Brock University, but who does not meet the higher admission standard established for the year of the application, will be granted similar consideration.

At the time of their initial application, applicants requesting special consideration must submit evidence to document their entitlement to be considered under one or more of the following categories:

i) the applicant is of Aboriginal ancestry;

ii) the applicant is a member of a visible minority; or

iii) the applicant is challenged by a disability.

Applications are reviewed on an individual basis and interviews may be required. The Undergraduate Student Affairs Committee may restrict the number of courses for which an applicant may register, for example, by requiring the completion of two credits with a 65 percent average before registration is permitted as a full-time student (as is the current practice for mature student admission).

Students admitted under this policy are required to meet the same standards for progression and graduation as required of all other students.

Senate 384

Students with disabilities should have access to academic programs without discrimination because of their disability.

For purposes of this policy, disabilities include such things as mobility impairments, vision impairment, hearing impairment and learning disabilities.

Senate 355

2.4.4 Non-Degree Student

A non-degree student is one who is not proceeding towards a Brock University degree. The non-degree students are identified as:

a) Post-degree students - those with degrees who are taking courses to qualify for further study or for personal interest. These students will normally be limited to part-time studies except where departmental approval has been received to do qualifying work for admission to a master or honours degree program at Brock.

b) Letter of permission students - those authorized by their home universities to take courses at Brock.

Senate 291, 394, 411

2.4.5 Transfer Students

A. Transfers From Other Canadian Universities

Applicants wishing to transfer to Brock from degree programs at other Canadian universities must be in good standing and normally offer the equivalent of an overall average of 60 percent. Admission is not guaranteed by attainment of the minimum requirements.

Applicants must also be eligible to re-register at their previous institution. Normally, transfer credit will be granted only for courses passed which are appropriate to the chosen program. Transfer averages at the previous university will be recorded on the transfer students' records to place those students on an equal basis with those who take their entire undergraduate program at Brock.

B. Transfers from Non-Canadian Universities

The grades from other universities whose grading schemes differ from Brock University will be translated into Brock grades and admissibility and transfer credit assessed in those terms. Evaluation of all possible transfer credits available at the time of admission must be completed within one year of the date of admission to the University. Admission is not guaranteed by attainment of the minimum requirements.

In considering application from other universities (transfer students), a numerical value of 45 percent will be assigned to every grade of "F" for the purpose of calculating the transfer grade average.

Senate 393, 400, 411, 432

C. Colleges of Applied Arts and Technology

Graduates of a three-year diploma program with a cumulative average of 70 percent, or an average of 70 percent in the last two semesters of a three-year diploma program, will be considered for admission, and may be awarded up to five credits. In some cases, where programs at the college and Brock are quite compatible, up to seven and a half credits may be awarded with the approval of the department.

Applicants who have completed two years of a three-year diploma program or graduates of a two-year program with a cumulative average of 70 percent will be considered for admission and may be awarded up to three credits. In cases where the programs at the college and Brock are quite compatible, up to 5 credits may be awarded with the approval of the department.

Applicants who have completed one year of a college program, may be considered for admission to first year with no transfer credits provided that an average of 75 percent has been achieved and the program is of an academic nature.

Senate 438, 451

Admission is not guaranteed by attainment of the minimum requirements. The awarding of transfer credit is based primarily upon:

i) the appropriateness of the previous program to the Brock program;

ii) course content; and

iii) grades achieved in courses.

Senate 441

D. CMA, CGA, CA

individuals with CMA, CGA, CA designations may be granted up to five transferred credits. A minimum grade of 70 percent in courses required for the CMA, CGA, and CA programs will be acceptable for consideration for transfer credits.

E. Bible College

Applicants who have completed a degree program at a Bible college accredited by the Association for Biblical Higher Education (ABHE) will be considered for admission and may receive transfer credit of up to a maximum of five credits.

F. Former Brock Students

Former Brock students, seeking re-admission after having attended another post-secondary institution in the interim, must complete the Brock Application for Re-admission form and forward official transcripts of all such post-secondary institutions attended, for re-admission consideration and possible transfer of credit.

Senate 61, 66, 136, 222, 277, 301, 443, 500

2.4.6 Admission to a Second Undergraduate Degree

A University graduate must have completed the requirements for a first degree and normally offer the equivalent of an overall average of 65 percent as a minimum with a higher average being required where enrolments are limited.

Brock graduates use the internal application form, available in the Office of the Registrar, to apply for a second undergraduate degree. Graduates of other universities use the OUAC 105 application form.

Students admitted to a Pass Degree program will be granted advanced standing to a maximum of seven credits from the first degree. Students admitted to a BA with Major, a BSc with Major, a BPhEd with Major, a BRLS with Major, a BSM with Major, a BKin or BBA degree program or an Honours degree program will be granted advanced standing to a maximum of ten credits from the first degree.

The requirements for holding two Brock undergraduate degrees are shown under FHB III: 6.5.

Senate 400, 450, 457

2.4.7 Concurrent Secondary School/University Enrolment

Students enrolled for less than a full-time load of six Grade 12 U or M courses, may be permitted to register concurrently in one credit, subject to the following provisions:

a) They must be registered in a sufficient number of Grade 12 U or M courses to complete the requirements for an Ontario Secondary School Diploma (OSSD) which meets normal University admission requirements.

b) They must have at least a 75 percent in the previous high school year in an advanced level program, be recommended by their school and be approved by the Brock department concerned.

c) Credit will be granted upon successful completion of the course and fulfilment of Brock's admission requirements.

d) Consideration under this regulation may also be given for students formally approved through the Brock Mentorship Program, Faculty of Mathematics and Science.

Senate 277, 308, 352, 485

2.4.8 Admission of Senior Citizens

Senior citizens (60 years of age or older) are encouraged to apply for admission to full-time or part-time studies as either credit or audit students. Students 60 years of age or older will be required to pay the regular tuition fee. However, a tuition waiver will be available upon request.

Senate 277; Board of Trustees June 23/94

2.4.9 Re-Admission of Students who were Required to Withdraw

The appeal to re-register shall be addressed to the Registrar (or designate) for referral to the Undergraduate Student Appeals Board.

Senate 382, 589

2.5 Proof of Proficiency in English

A. All applicants whose first language is not English must provide evidence of proficiency of English as demonstrated through one of the following:

1) A minimum of three years of full-time study, in an English language school system (where the primary language of instruction and evaluation was English) with acceptable grades in English and other humanities/social science courses from their secondary school year;

2) Completion of the International Baccalaureate diploma where English was the language of instruction;

3) Achievement of an overall Band Score of 70, with no other under 60 on the Carleton Academic English Language Assessment (CAEL), or completion of the York English Language Test (YELT) with an overall category of 1 or 2;

Senate 513, 522

4) TOEFL IBT (Internet-based Test of English as a Foreign Language), TOEFL CBT (Computer-based Test of English as a Foreign Language), MELAB (Michigan English Language Assessment Battery), IELTS (International Language Testing System); ITELP (International Test of English Language Proficiency); or PTE Academic (Pearson Test of English) scores. Normally, only those with TOEFL IBT scores of 88 or greater, with a minimum of 21 on Speaking and 21 on Writing;  TOEFL CBT scores of 237 or greater, with a minimum of 4.5 on the Essay Rating score; MELAB scores of 85 or greater, with no other part under 80; ITELP scores of 565 or greater, with a minimum composition score of 240; IELTS scores of 6.5 or greater, with no band below 6.0; and PTE Academic Scores of 58 will be considered for admission.

Senate 522, 525, 531, 577, 582

5) Successful completion of Level 5 of the Brock Intensive English Language Program.

Students from the Intensive English Language Program entering on the recommendation of the Director of ESL Services may be required to enrol in AESL 1P92 in year one along with a maximum of four and one half additional credits.

Senate 522, 577

B. Consecutive Teacher Education: All applicants to the consecutive Bachelor of Education Teacher Education program whose first language is not English must provide evidence of proficiency in English as demonstrated through one of the following:

1) TOEFL IBT (Internet-based Test of English as a Foreign Language) - with a minimum score of 100, including a minimum of 27 on Writing and 27 on Speaking;

2) TOEFL CBT - (Computer based Test of English as a Foreign Language) with a minimum score of 250, including a minimum of 5.5 on the Essay Rating score;

3) ITELP (International Test of English Language Proficiency) with a minimum score of 580, with a minimum composition score of 260;

4) IELTS (International English Language Testing System) with a minimum score of 7.0;

5) MELAB (Michigan English Language Assessment Battery) with a minimum score of 90 and a minimum score of 83 on composition;

6) PTE Academic (Pearson test of English Academic) with a minimum score of 68.

Senate 525, 531, 577, 582

C. TESL Certificate: All applicants to the post-graduate TESL (Teaching English as a Second Language Certificate program) whose first language is not English must provide evidence of proficiency in English as demonstrated through one of the following:

1) TOEFL IBT (Internet-based Test of English as a Foreign Language) - with a minimum score of 100, including a minimum of 27 on Writing and 27 on Speaking;

2) TOEFL CBT (Computer-Based Test of English as a Foreign Language) with a minimum score of 250, including a minimum of 5.5 on the Essay Rating score, as well as a 60 on the TSE (Test of Spoken English);

3) ITELP (International Test of English Language Proficiency) with a minimum score of 580, with a minimum composition score of 260;

4) IELTS (International English Language Testing System) with a minimum overall band score of 7.0, with no less than 7 on any other band;

5) MELAB (Michigan English Language Assessment Battery) with a minimum overall score of 90, and a minimum score of 83 on composition.

Senate 277, 375, 413, 435, 444, 455, 466, 476, 500, 501, 525, 531, 577

3. Registration

3.1 Registration and Course Changes

3.1.1 Registration

All students must register during the official registration period designated for each session or term. Late registration may be permitted, upon payment of a fee, during the same periods each session as course changes are permitted (see 3.1.2). Registration will not be permitted after those times without appropriate permissions and payment of any late registration fee.

Senate 144, 175, 212, 615

3.1.2 Course Changes

A. All course changes must be made through the Office of the Registrar.

B. Full and half-year Fall/Winter Session credit courses may be changed without penalty during the first two weeks of classes prior to the closure of online registration.  Course changes will be permitted after this period of time with the permission of the instructor and payment of any late registration fee.

C. Spring and Summer Session courses may be changed without penalty during the first week of classes prior to the closure of on-line registration. Course changes will be permitted after this period of time with the permission of the instructor and upon payment of any late registration fee.  No course changes will be permitted after this period without appropriate permissions and payment of any late registration fee.

Senate 175, 212, 290, 615

3.1.3 Permission to Audit a Credit Course

Permission to audit a credit course may be given by the Registrar after consultation with, and the consent of, the instructor of the course. An auditor may not receive any assessment of performance in the course.

Senate 79

3.1.4

Students may not register in courses scheduled (in whole or in part) at the same time of day without permission of each instructor.  Instructors are not obligated to make accommodations for student scheduled conflicts, and may request the Registrar's Office to deregister a student where permission is denied.

Senate 442, 616

4. Withdrawals

4.1 Required Withdrawal

Senate may at any time require a student to withdraw from one or more courses or from the University.

Senate 4

4.2 Formal Voluntary Withdrawal

4.2.1

A student may voluntarily withdraw from the University and/or courses (except those courses noted in 4.2.2) without academic penalty by informing the Office of the Registrar, in writing,

i) No later than the end of the eighth week of classes in half-credit courses, or the fourteenth week of classes in full-credit courses, for fall/winter sessions (or equivalent for courses employing alternative durations);

ii) No later than the end of the third week for half-credit courses and the end of the fifth week for full-credit courses in Spring Session (or equivalent for courses employing alternative durations);

iii) No later than the end of the first week for half-credit courses and the end of the second week for full-credit courses in Summer Session (or equivalent for courses employing alternative durations):

Senate 475, 506, 606

4.2.2

Project courses may be excluded from 4.2.1. In excluding a project course from 4.2.1, instructors must inform students, via the course outline, that withdrawals will not be accepted after the two-thirds point of scheduled classes.

4.2.3

The week of withdrawal from a course, following the course change period, will be recorded on the student's official transcript.

4.2.4 Removed

 

Senate 365, 441, 482, 615

4.3 Refund of Fees

A student who withdraws in good standing may be entitled to a certain refund of tuition fees, but if holding any scholarship within University control will, on withdrawing, forfeit the total value of this award.

Senate 12

5. Curriculum

5.1 General Regulations

5.1.1 Terminology

The designation "half credit" is to be applied to a course normally taken entirely in one term of a Fall/Winter Session or its equivalent in Spring or Summer Session; a "credit" is to be taken during the full session or its equivalent. Two half credits are equivalent in one credit.

Senate 84, 126, 144, 212

5.1.2 Usage

Regulations applying to full credit courses in FHB III will also, unless specifically covered below, apply to half credit courses. When credit is considered in this section, "credit" means full credit course or equivalent, as in 5.1.1.

Senate 84, 126, 212

5.2 Course Levels and Course Load

5.2.1 Explanation of Course Numbers

Courses numbered 1(alpha)00-1(alpha)99, 2(alpha)00-2(alpha)99, 3(alpha)00-3(alpha)99 and 4(alpha)00-4(alpha)99 are normally Year 1, 2, 3 and 4 courses respectively. Courses numbered 2(alpha)90-2(alpha)99 may be considered as Year 2 or 3 courses; and 3(alpha)90-3(alpha)99 as Year 3 or 4 courses.

Senate 128, 212

5.2.2 Normal Credit Loads

A. Normal credit loads for full-time students are as follows:

i) Fall/Winter Session: five credits;

ii) Fall or winter Term (only): two and one-half credits;

iii)Spring Session: two credits; and

iv) Summer Session: one credit.

B. Students wishing to exceed the normal credit loads stipulated above must first obtain permission from the Dean of their Faculty.

Senate 128, 147, 212, 251, 615

5.2.3 Simultaneous Credits in One Department

Students who propose to attempt, concurrently, five or more credits offered by any one Department/Centre must first obtain permission from the Dean of their Faculty. In the case of Departments/Centres that Senate has determined provide distinctively different kinds of study, this special permission will be required only of students intending to attempt five credits concurrently in one stream.

Senate 128, 147, 212, 251, 615

5.3 Academic Accommodation for Students with Disabilities (Approved during Senate 595)

5.3.1 Statement on Course Syllabus
 
As part of Brock University's commitment to As part of Brock University's commitment to a respectful work and learning environment, the University will make every reasonable effort to accommodate all members of the university community with disabilities. If you require academic accommodations related to a documented disability to participate in this course, you are encouraged to contact Services for Students with Disabilities in the Student Development Centre (4th floor Schmon Tower, ex. 3240). You are also encouraged to discuss any accommodations with the instructor well in advance of due dates and scheduled assessments.
                                                                                                                Senate 544
                                                                                          

5.4 Academic Organizational Nomenclature

5.4.1 Departments

Departments are units which offer programs of study that are either discipline-based or cross-disciplinary and are comprised of four or more faculty who share research and teaching interests. Departments offer undergraduate and graduate programs, are administered by a Chair, and report to an appropriate Dean.

5.4.2 Centres

Centres are small disciplinary or cross-disciplinary units that offer one or more programs of study, are comprised of faculty who share research and teaching interests, and have three or fewer full-time faculty appointments. They are administered by a Director and/or a co-ordinating committee, and report to a designated Dean.

5.4.3 Institutes

Institutes are disciplinary or cross-disciplinary units that have a particular research focus. Faculty are associated with Institutes but are not directly appointed to them. Institutes are administered by a Director and/or co-ordinating committee, and report to a designated Dean or the Vice-President, Academic.

Senate 470

6. Undergraduate Degree Program Requirements

6.1 Literacy in English and Numeracy

A. The University recognizes that literacy and numeracy are strongly related to academic success.

Senate 334, 555

B. Departments, Centres and Programs may choose to administer their own literacy and numeracy assessments and requirements.

Departments, Centres and Programs should also consult FHB III: 5.3 regarding provisions for students with disabilities.

Senate 555

C. Students may be required by the University to take credit courses in English as a Subsequent Language as a condition of registration.

Senate 19, 97, 228, 321, 334, 555

6.2 Distribution Requirement ("Core and Context")

A. All students, regardless of program, must successfully complete the equivalent of one credit each from among specified courses in the Humanities, Social Sciences and Sciences. Those courses approved for "Core and Context" credit will be published in the Calendar.

B. Courses which qualify for contextual standing must meet the following criteria:

1. Contextual courses in the sciences should involve the study of the principles by which the physical world operates, in order to understand the present technical basis of our civilization.

2. Contextual courses in the Social Sciences study people in their social interaction, which implies some study of the content and methods of the social sciences. Each course offered as a Social Sciences context must include a significant writing component and an integral seminar, tutorial, lab or other type of facilitated interaction that encourages critical thinking, small group learning, relationship building and regular individual participation.

                                                                                                                                 Senate 606

3. Contextual courses in the Humanities should involve the study of the introspective and imaginative life of humankind - which implies the study of cultural, intellectual and artistic ideas, both past and present from the humanities perspective. Each course offered as a Humanities context elective must provide not only an introduction to the critical thinking of a humanities discipline but also a broad introduction to basic issues and/or significant works of the human heritage. Each course offered as a Humanities context elective must include a significant essay component and an integral seminar, tutorial, lab or other type of facilitated interaction that encourages critical thinking, small group learning, relationship building and regular individual participation. 

                                                                                                                            Senate 606

Humanities contextual offerings should be at the introductory level (i.e., numbered in the 1(alpha)00-1(alpha)99 range). However, a student who is sufficiently experienced in a language other than English may meet his Humanities requirement with an upper-level literature course in that language with the approval of the instructor and the Dean of the Faculty of Humanities. Acceptable language courses must include a significant literature component.

C. The designation of any course for which Core and Context designation is sought, shall first be approved by the Deans of the related Faculties.

D. Among the first five credits successfully completed, students must have taken:

1. Courses from at least four Departments. In the cases of Departments that Senate has determined to provide distinctively different kinds of study, two streams may be counted separate Departments for purposes of this regulation.

2. Courses in at least two of the three Faculties of Humanities, Mathematics and Sciences and Social Sciences.

3. At least one of the required three Core and Context courses.

E. Among the first ten credits successfully completed, students must have taken all three of the required Core and Context courses. Students in four-year honours professional programs must complete the Core and Context requirements by the end of the third year of the program.

F. In cases where discipline are listed under two categories, only one of the requirements may be fulfilled by courses in that discipline (e.g., if HIST 1F95 is taken to fulfil the requirement of the Humanities option, HIST 1P92/1P93 may not be taken to fulfil the Social Science requirement).

Senate 208, 212, 251, 295, 355, 404, 571

6.3  (Deleted at Senate 576)

 

6.4 General Degree Requirements

A. Except in the BA General Humanities and the BA Social Sciences, a Pass Degree will be awarded upon the successful completion of 15 credits with a 60 percent average in the courses designated by their Department/Centre as major credits and a minimum overall average of 60 percent; additionally, each student awarded transfer credits must have achieved a minimum 60 percent overall average on courses taken at Brock.  A maximum of eight credits may be numbered 1(alpha)00 to 1(alpha)99; at least three credits must be numbered 2(alpha)90 or above; and the remaining credits must be numbered 2(alpha)00 or above.
 

B. A BA with Major, a BSc with Major, a BPhEd with major, a BRLS with Major, a BSM with Major, a BKin or a BBA degree will be awarded upon the successful completion of 20 credits with a minimum major average of 60 percent and a minimum of 60 percent overall average. A maximum of eight credits may be numbered 1(alpha)00 to 1(alpha)99 and at least 12 credits must be numbered 2(alpha)00 or above.  Six of the 12 credits must be numbered 2(alpha)90 or above and at least one and one-half to three of these must be credits numbered 3(alpha)90 or above as specified by individual Department/Centre and program requirements.
 

C. An Honours Degree will be awarded upon the successful completion of 20 credits with First or Second Class standing.  A maximum of eight credits may be numbered 1(alpha)00 to 1(alpha)99; at least three credits must be numbered 2(alpha)90 or above; at least three credits must be numbered 3(alpha)90 or above; and the remaining credits must be numbered 2(alpha)00 or above.

D. In some circumstances, in order to meet the university degree and program requirements, more than 15 or 20 credits may be taken.
 

E. For a BA or BSc degree a maximum of seven credits towards a BA with Major, a BSc with Major or an Honours degree and a maximum of five credits towards a Pass degree may be from among any or all of those given by the Faculty of Applied Sciences, the Faculty of Education or the Goodman School of Business (including courses cross listed with that Faculty). Exceptions will be made for BA and BSc degrees offered by the Faculty of Applied Health Sciences.
 

F. A student transferring from another university may earn a first degree, either a Brock 15 or 20 credit degree, with a minimum of five credits at Brock.
 

G. For consideration to proceed to year 4 of an honours degree, a student must normally have obtained a minimum 70 percent major average and a minimum 60 percent in the remaining credits (including transfer credits). Students should consult the appropriate Department/Centre for further information.
 

Senate Dec. 16/81, 41, 97, 138, 140, 165, 189, 212, 280, 283, 393, 413, 450, 457, 501, 583, 589, 615
 

6.5 Requirements for a Second Undergraduate Degree

With the exception of the BA/BEd, BPhEd/BEd and BSc/BEd degrees, students may not pursue two undergraduate degrees concurrently.

A. An individual who wishes to pursue a second undergraduate degree (e.g., a BA after a BPhEd) must:

i. have successfully completed the first degree; and

ii. make application for admission and been admitted to the second degree program (see Admissions for further information); and

iii. fulfill all the specific requirements of each degree program including prerequisites, co-requisites and honours standing requirements (where appropriate); and

To obtain a second degree, students must have completed, with satisfactory standing, at least 50 percent more credits beyond the first degree. The minimum total credits for both degrees are:

i. For a Pass BA, BSc, BRLS and a second Pass degree: 23 credits

ii. For a Pass BA, BSc, BRLS and a different Honours degree: 27 credits

iii. For a Pass BA, BBE, BSc, BRLS, BPhEd or BSM and a BA with Major, a BSc with Major, a BPhEd with Major, a BRLS with Major, a BSM with Major, a BKin or a BBA degree: 27 credits

iv. For a BA with Major, a BSc with Major, a BPhEd with Major, a BRLS with Major, a BSM with Major, a BKin or a BBA degree and a different 20 credit degree: 30 credits.

v. For a BA with Major, a BSC with Major, a BPhEd with Major, a BRLS with Major, a BSM with Major, a BKin or a BBA degree and a different Honours degree: 30 credits

vi. For an Honours BA, BBE, BECE, BSc, BPhEd, BPH, BKin, BRLS, BScN, BAcc, BBA, BCB, BMus or BSM and a second Honours degree: 30 credits.

Senate 615

B. An applicant who has a bachelor's degree from Brock University or another institution may be allowed to pursue undergraduate studies leading to a second bachelor's degree of the same or another designation under the following conditions:

i) the principal area of study or academic emphasis of the second degree must be distinct from that of the first degree.

ii) the student must complete, with satisfactory standing, at least 50 percent more credits beyond the first degree (see required number of credits above);

iii) the student must meet all program requirements for the second degree;

iv) any departure from the standard (see i. and ii. above) must be approved by the Dean of the appropriate faculty.

C. For any second degree, an individual may take only those 1(alpha)00-1(alpha)99 courses specifically required to fulfil the requirements for the second degree.

D. A Student holding a BA (General Humanities) degree is not permitted to pursue a second undergraduate degree in a BA (Social Sciences) or vice versa without approval of the Dean of the Faculty where the second degree is sought.

Senate 147, July 31/74, 180, 212, 260, 280, 393 413, 441, 450, 457, 501, 589, 615

6.6 Academic Regulations Pertaining to Certificate Programs

1. Admission requirements are the same as for degree programs. (Secondary school application, transfer application, mature student admission, non-degree admission and special admission.)

2. Certificate programs are subject to the same academic regulations as those governing degree programs.

3. Students admitted to a certificate program will normally be limited to part-time studies.

a) Registration will normally be limited to a maximum of 2.00 credits in the Fall/Winter Session, a maximum of 1.00 credit in the Spring Session and a maximum of 1.00 credit in the Summer Session.

b) Exceptions to this regulation may be granted by the Dean of the appropriate Faculty.

4. Students seeking admission to the certificate program following the completion of a degree or diploma program from a university, or college will be limited in the number of transferrable credits.

a) No more than one credit from all the courses included in the university degree or college diploma program may be used in the certificate program.

b) With special permission of the Dean of the appropriate faculty, one credit may be taken on a Letter of Permission.

c) Students wishing to hold both a degree/diploma and a certificate must fulfil the course requirements for both the degree/diploma and the certificate.

5. Students may not be concurrently registered in a certificate program and a degree program.

6. Students may not pursue two certificates concurrently.

7. All credits earned in a certificate program may be transferrable to a degree program.

8. A maximum of one credit may be obtained by Challenge for Credit.

9. A certificate is awarded upon the successful completion of the courses required for the certificate program with a cumulative overall average as determined by the offering department/program. Transfer credits from colleges will not be included in the calculation of the overall average. Any credits transferred from a Brock or other university degree program to a certificate program will be included in the calculation of the overall average.

Senate 430, 454, 615

6.6.1 Non-Credit Certificate Programs

All Non-Credit Certificate Programs offered through the University shall be reported to the Undergraduate Program Committee annually. In the first academic year in which the program is offered, a more detailed report including the title, nature and brief contents description and the mechanism for the assurance of academic quality, shall be provided. This may be covered simply by the program brochure.

Senate 443

6.7 Types of Programs Offered

A. The University offers four types of programs leading to the bachelor's degree as follows:

i) Major Programs enable students to pursue studies in depth in one discipline;

ii) Combined Major Programs enable students to pursue studies in depth in two disciplines;

iii) Integrated Studies Programs enable students to pursue an individually planned program crossing several disciplines around some approved focus or theme; and

iv) General Studies Programs enable students to pursue a program that does not coincide with either a single major or combined major program and allows further breadth of elective choice.

B. All Departments/Centres withing the Faculties of Humanities, Mathematics and Sciences and Social Sciences offer either BA (Pass and Honours) or BSc (Pass and Honours) degree programs. BA with Major or BSc with Major degree programs are also offered by some Departments/Centres in each of these Faculties. The Faculty of Mathematics and Science offers the BCB (Honours) degree program. The Faculty of Social Sciences offers the BBE (Honours) degree. The Faculty of Humanities offers the BMus (Honours) degree program.

C. The Goodman School of Business offers the Honours BBA, the BBA and the Honours BAcc degrees.

D. The Faculty of Applied Health Sciences offers a BPhEd (Honours) and a BPhEd with Major degree program, BSc (Honours) in Kinesiology, BSc in Kinesiology, BKin (Honours) and BKin degree, BScN (Honours), BRLS (Pass with Major and Honours), BSM (with Major and Honours), BSc (Honours) in  Medical Sciences, BPH (Honours), BA (Pass) in Community Health and BA (Honours) in Child Health degree programs.

E. The Faculty of Education offers programs leading to the BEd degree. Under conditions laid down by the Ontario Ministry of Education, successful completion of the BEd Program will lead to the award of the Ontario Certificate of Qualifications. Other programs leading to the BEd degree are available for certified teachers and those who wish to attain the BEd as a first degree. The Faculty of Education also offers the BEd in Aboriginal Adult Education and BEd in Adult Education degree programs, and a Bachelor of Early Childhood Education (Honours)

Senate 31, 97, 212, 283, 304, 450, 457, 501, 615

6.8 Pattern of Major Programs

A Major Program is established by the individual Department in accordance with Senate's academic regulations and normally consists of a course pattern that includes:

i) a minimum of six and a maximum of eight credits in the major discipline for a Pass Degree and a minimum of nine and a maximum of twelve credits in the major discipline for a BA with Major, a BSc with Major, a BPhEd with Major, a BRLS with Major, a BSM with Major, a BKin or a BBA degree and an Honours Degree;

ii) extra-departmental requirements;

iii) core and context requirements;

iv) at least one free elective in making up the requirements for a Pass Degree and at least two free electives in making up the requirements for a BA with Major, a BSc with Major, a BPhEd with Major, a BRLS with Major, a BSM with Major, a BKin or a BBA degree and an Honours Degree (see FHB III: 6.4).

Senate 97, 450, 457

6.9 Pattern of Combined Major Programs

A. A Combined Major Program is established in the two individual Departments in accordance with Senate's academic regulations and normally consists of a course pattern that includes:

i) a minimum of five credits in each of the two major disciplines for a Pass Degree and a minimum of seven credits in each of the two major disciplines for a BA with Major, a BSc with Major, and an Honours Degree;

ii) requirements outside of the two major Departments concerned

iii) core and context requirements;

iv) free electives to make up the requirements for a degree (see FHB III: 6.4).

B. If a simple majority of the credits taken during the program has been drawn from courses offered by the Departments comprising the Faculty of Mathematics and Sciences, the degree awarded upon satisfaction of all graduation requirements will be the BSc (Pass), BSc with Major or BSc(Honours) as appropriate; if drawn from those courses offered by the Departments/Centres comprising the Faculties of Humanities and/or Social Sciences, the degree awarded shall be the BA (Pass) or BA with Major or BA (Honours) as appropriate.

Senate 97, 192, 212, 450, 457, 615

6.10 Pattern of Integrated Studies Programs

A. Integrated Studies Programs are specifically-constructed programs at the Pass or Honours level which span two or more Departments. They are designed to satisfy students whose unique interests cannot be accommodated by a major or a combined major pattern of study. Students wishing to pursue such a program should demonstrate a clear and pre-determined plan of interdisciplinary study.

B. In addition to the general University requirements (see FHB III: 6.4), an Integrated Studies Program must include an appropriate credit in mathematics or applied computing or computer science (if the pattern of studies includes an emphasis in sciences)

C. The following regulations will apply to the administration of Integrated Studies Programs:

i) All such programs must be submitted to an academic Dean for prior approval.  Any changes to a program must be approved by the Dean. The Dean may appoint an interested faculty member to advise the student on an appropriate pattern of study.

ii) A student may not choose an Integrated Studies Program involving two disciplines where a Combined Major Program is available.

iii) When preparing an Integrated Studies Program, special care must be taken to ensure that prerequisite requirements for advanced courses are met and that the schedule for cycled courses is considered.

iv) Students enrolled in Integrated Studies Programs must maintain second class honours standing in order to continue and to graduate.

v) Integrated Studies Programs are not possible in Education.

vi) If a simple majority of credits taken during the program has been drawn from courses offered by the Faculty of Mathematics and Sciences, then the degree awarded upon satisfaction of all graduation requirements will be the BSc or BSc(Honours) as appropriate.

vii) On recommendation of the Academic Dean, appropriate wording describing a focus or theme of study be attached to the Honours Degree, for example: BA (Honours) Integrated Studies (Industrial Studies); BSc (Honours) Integrated Studies (Natural Sciences).

Senate 283, 589, 615

6.11 Pattern of General Programs

6.11.1 Bachelor of Arts

1. BA General Humanities and BA Social Sciences Degrees are available at the Pass (15 credits) level only.

2. A student may select a maximum of five credits from each of two disciplines (including courses cross listed with each discipline), with the exception of courses from the Faculty of Applied Health Sciences, Faculty of Education and the Goodman School of Business. In these cases, a maximum of five credits may be taken from any combination of designated Applied Health Sciences, Business and Education courses (including courses cross listed with that Faculty.)

3. For a BA General Humanities the majority of the credits earned must be offered by Department/Centres with the Faculty of Humanities. For a BA Social Sciences the majority of the credits earned must be offered by Department/Centres within the Faculty of Social Sciences.

4. Students pursuing a BA General Humanities or BA Social Sciences Degree must satisfy all general University requirements, including one context credit from the list of eligible courses in the Faculties of Humanities, Social Sciences and Mathematics and Science.

5. A maximum of eight credits may be numbered 1(alpha)00 to 1(alpha)99; at least three credits must be numbered 2(alpha)90 or above; and the remaining credits must be numbered 2(alpha)00 or above.

6. A minimum overall average of 60 percent is required for graduation.

7. A BA General Humanties and a BA Social Sciences Degree will carry no major or area of concentration.  A BA General Humanities may carry up to two minors if the majority of credits are within the Faculty of Humanities.  A BA Social Sciences may carry up to two minors if the majority of credits are within the Faculty of Social Sciences.

Senate 283, 395, 615

6.11.2 Bachelor of Science

1. A Bachelor of Science is available for students who wish a lesser degree of concentration than is offered by other programs. This Bachelor of Science is offered at the Pass and Honours degree level. This Bachelor of Science will carry no major, minor or area of concentration.

2. Of the 15 credits required for a Pass degree, at least five must be in one discipline and three in another discipline.

3. Of the 20 credits required for an Honours degree, at least seven must be in one discipline and five in another discipline.

4. A maximum of seven credits from any combination of courses from the Faculty of Applied Health Sciences, the Faculty of Education or the Goodman School of Business may be included in the Bachelor of Science Honours degree (including courses cross listed with that Faculty); a maximum of five credits may be taken within this Bachelor of Science Pass degree (including courses cross listed with that Faculty).  Education may only be used as the three-credit component and only in a Pass degree.  An Honours degree with Education as a component is not possible in this degree.

5. If a simple majority of the courses taken during this Bachelor of Science Program has been drawn from courses offered by the departments comprising the Faculty of Mathematics and Sciences, then the degree awarded upon satisfaction of all graduate requirements will be the  BSc (Honours) or BSc (3 Year) as appropriate.

Senate 283, 615

6.12 Certificate Programs

A. The Faculty of Education, and certain Departments/Centres within the Faculty of Social Sciences, the Faculty of Humanities, the Faculty of Mathematics and Science and the Faculty of Applied Health Sciences offer programs at the undergraduate level leading to various Certificates. A current list of approved Certificates is found at www.brocku.ca/webcal/. These are subject to the same regulations as those regulating degree programs.

Senate 413, 433, 443, 454, 460, 615

B. The Faculty of Education offers a variety of courses, subject to Ontario College of Teachers' approval, for the purpose of upgrading teacher qualifications. The admission to and conduct of such courses is subject to regulation by the Ontario College of Teachers.

Senate 107, 149, 212, 615

6.13 Miscellaneous Degree Requirements

6.13.1 Letters of Permission

A. A student may request a Letter of Permission from the Office of the Registrar in order to take a course or courses at another university as a visiting student for transfer credit to Brock. The student must be in good standing, that is, having successfully completed a minimum of five credits with a minimum overall average of 60 percent. Brock credit will not be granted to students who Challenge for Credit, on Letter of Permission, at the host institution.

B. The student must indicate the specific course(s) he/she wishes to take and provide the Office of the Registrar with the course description(s) from the calendar of the host university. Course(s) requested should be relevant to a student's degree program and must be approved by the student's academic Department.  Approval shall be at the discretion of the Department/Centre, who shall base the decision on the  applicant's overall academic record, the appropriateness of the particular course to the applicant's program and on any other factors deemed relevant.

C. If a letter of permission is granted to a currently registered student, it must be provisional pending successful completion of the progression requirements for that session.

D. On return to the Registrar's Office of the approved application, the Registrar will forward a Letter of Permission to the host university. Students should contact the host university to determine any course access limitations imposed on visiting students.

E. Students must formally request that an official transcript be forwarded by the host university to Brock. The transcript must be received within eight weeks of the course end date as specified on the application for the Letter of Permission. Failure to provide an official transcript will result in the automatic assignment of a failing (F) grade in each course attempted on the Letter of Permission.

F. Not more than five courses may be taken at other universities on a Letter of Permission to fulfill graduation requirements for any baccalaureate program at Brock. Courses taken as part of the BEd, Aboriginal Adult Education and Adult Education programs, are exempt from this regulation.

G. A student may not, without the permission of his/her Dean, enroll in more than two of his/her last five credits at another university. Courses taken as part of an Exchange Program, i.e., a program established by a signed agreement between Brock and another institution and those in the Bachelor of Education in Aboriginal Adult Education or Adult Education are exempt from this regulation.

H. Courses taken on a Letter of Permission or on an Exchange program will not be included in the calculation of any student average, e.g., graduation, progression.

I. Credit will be granted only when the course is completed successfully at the host institution. Course credit will be granted equal in value to the course weight assigned by the host institution. Any course attempted under a letter of permission or Exchange program shall be recorded as a Pass/Fail grade. The exact name and title of the course(s) taken, the name of the host institution, and the grade assigned by the institution, will appear on the transcript.

J. For the purpose of future registration, course content covered on a transfer of credit basis may serve as either a prerequisite or equivalent, as determined by the Department/Centre in which the student is registered.

K. Students granted permission to take the final course(s) of their program during a Fall/Winter Session may not graduate until the next Fall Convocation, unless marks, in the form of an official transcript, are received by the Registrar's Office by May 15. Students who receive permission to take the final course(s) of their program during a Spring/Summer Session, must submit an official transcript to the Registrar's Office by October 1; otherwise, their graduation may be postponed until the next Spring Convocation.

Senate 405, 407, 460, 470, 476. 501, 554, 615

6.13.2 Waiver of Requirements

Departments/Centres may waive prerequisite courses or required program courses for degree candidates who have considerable relevant work experience. Such candidates must, however, complete the required number of credits for a degree.

Senate 193

6.13.3 Applicable Calendar

A student who has maintained enrolment in at least one credit in each calendar year may complete the degree program using the section "Academic Regulations" of the Calendar operative in the year in which that program was entered. Students who interrupt their studies for more than one calendar year, however, become subject to the Calendar regulations and the degree program in effect at the time of their re-registration.

Senate 165, 393

6.13.4

Students in Bachelors' Degrees are normally expected to complete degree requirements within 10 years of first registration. Students who exceed 10 years may be required to re-take prerequisite courses where the knowledge base in specific disciplines has changed substantially in the intervening period.

Senate 470

6.14 Awarding of a Posthumous Degree

A posthumous degree is awarded at the discretion of the Dean of the student's Faculty, on the recommendation of the Chair(s)/Director(s) of the appropriate Department(s) or Centre(s). To be eligible, a student for whom such a recommendation is made, must normally have succeeded in completing at least 75 percent of the degree program and have begun the final 25 percent of the program. The notation "posthumous" will be recorded on the student's official academic record, but will not appear on the diploma.

Senate 444, 615

6.15 Requirements re: Concentration

A concentration in an honours degree normally requires a minimum of six credits from a list of courses approved by the relevant academic unit(s). A concentration enables students to pursue studies with some approved focus within their major or combined major program.

Senate 444, 477

6.16 Requirements re: Minors

A minor is distinct from the student's major, or combined major, and requires from four to six credits as designated by the relevant academic unit or units. Students wishing to obtain a Minor, within a degree program, may not use the same course(s) to satisfy both the major requirement and the minor requirement.

Senate 477, 501

7. Departmental Program Requirements

7.1 Course Approval

All degree-credit courses must be approved for inclusion in the "Course Bank" by the Undergraduate Program Committee prior to being offered. Any course which has not been approved for inclusion or has been deleted may not be offered. Those courses approved for inclusion will be published in the Calendar.

Senate 212, 234

7.2 Changes in Designation

Changes to the number, title or description of any approved course must be:

a) reported to the Undergraduate Program Committee if the proposed change does not significantly alter either the focus or nature of the course, or,

b) approved by the Undergraduate Program Committee if the proposed change significantly alters either the focus or nature of the course.

Senate 234

7.3 Course Deletions

A. Deletions from the Course Bank must be approved by the Undergraduate Program Committee.

B. Any course not offered over a period of three consecutive years, and not proposed for offering during the fourth year, should be deleted from the Course Bank by the Undergraduate Program Committee. Any exceptions must be specifically justified by the Department concerned.

C. Any departmental course number deleted from the Course Bank can not be used again until five years have elapsed since the number was deleted.

Senate 234

7.4 Approval of Departmental Offerings

A. By October 15th of each year, each Department shall submit (to the appropriate Dean) a list of those courses which it wishes to offer in each session of the subsequent academic year.

B. Each Dean shall, in turn, submit each departmental submission to the Undergraduate Program Committee for approval.

C. Any and all additions and/or deletions to the original departmental submission must be approved by the appropriate Dean and reported to the Undergraduate Program Committee.

Senate 234

7.5 Limits on Departmental Offerings

A. As a general guideline in considering departmental submissions, the Undergraduate Program Committee may work on the principle that a Department shall not offer (in the Fall or Winter Term) more than 15 courses numbered 2(alpha)00-4(alpha)89 inclusive (courses in directed studies excepted), unless it had 300 or more student enrolments in courses at the 2(alpha)00-4(alpha)00 levels inclusive during the previous Fall/Winter Sessions.

B. For each additional 30 student enrolments at the 2(alpha)00-4(alpha)00 levels, one additional course may be offered.

C. In no event, however, shall the course offerings numbered 2(alpha)00-4(alpha)89 inclusive exceed three times the number of full-time faculty available for staffing the courses.

D. In applying these guidelines, Departments having more than a single section will be reviewed as multiple Departments corresponding to each section.

E. Any exceptions must be specifically justified by the Department concerned.

7.6 Required Courses

Normally, courses required for majors should be offered as part of regular load; they should not be cancelled if any students are enrolled.

Senate 276

7.7 Course Cancellations

A. If a course offered as part of a program and on load has not enrolments, it will be cancelled. The Chair and Dean may agree to an alternate deployment for the faculty member concerned.

B. If a course is offered as overload, it may be cancelled at the discretion of the Dean if it does not meet the following minima for undergraduate overload courses: a minimum of 13 students for First Year courses and a minimum of 10 students for Second, Third and Fourth Year courses.

C. In all cases where load courses are to be cancelled or where courses are to be redesignated from overload to load or from load to overload or to tutorial, or where an overload course has been guaranteed for offering without enrolment minima, all changes must be mutually agreed to by both the Dean and the Chair. Where no such arrangement can be achieved, no change should be made without the approval of the Undergraduate Program Committee.

Senate 306

7.8 Cancellation of Classes

A request for cancellation of a class must be approved by the Chair/Director of the Department/Centre. Whenever possible, an instructor should inform students of a class cancellation one week in advance, with appropriate reminders. Sudden cancellations due to illness or accident should be reported to the Chair/Director of the Department/Centre. individual departments will develop and implement their own procedures for communicating with students in the event of such an occurrence.

Senate 199, 256, 554

7.9 Program Approval

7.9.1 Introduction of New Programs

A. All new undergraduate degrees and new major programs to be offered under the aegis of existing degrees must be approved by Senate upon the recommendation of the Undergraduate Program Committee.

B. All changes to existing major and combined major programs, and all new combined major programs, must be approved by Senate upon the recommendation of the Undergraduate Program Committee.

Senate 234

7.9.2 Introduction of New Academic Units

All new Departments, Programs and Faculties must be approved by Senate upon the recommendation of the Undergraduate Program Committee.

Senate 234

7.9.3 Cross-Disciplinary Programs: Guidelines for Establishment

A. The Undergraduate Program Committee should examine the following (B to H) and make recommendations to Senate for approval in principle of such cross-disciplinary programs.

B. Consideration must be given to the type of program Brock is able to offer compared to similar programs existing elsewhere, often in their own "Department", to ensure that the program offered is of comparable nature and equivalent quality. (Note: this is not, however, to preclude innovation and development of entirely new programs at Brock.)

C. There must be a suitable administrative structure if a program does not appear to fall under the control of an existing Faculty or Department. This would also ensure that there is a group of faculty identified as responsible for the students. There are several models at Brock to choose from, e.g., Environmental Policy Institute (which has both a director and a small permanent staff of its own plus co-operating Departments and a council to decide on policy), or Labour Studies (which has a Director chosen from among cooperating faculty). Thus, a structure appropriate to an individual program must be recommended to Senate.

D. Any such new program must be compatible with the space, equipment, staff and financial resources of the University, and have been discussed with participating Departments.

E. Above all, they must have the enthusiastic support of participating faculty and include, where possible, team teaching of courses specific to the new programs.

F. A special problem for new programs is library resources. Most cross-disciplinary programs are in areas of existing faculty interest, so that basic holdings are available. The Committee on Information Technology and Infrastructure should suggest how the present formula for departmental grants might be extended to cover new cross-disciplinary programs which may or may not have courses in their own right.

G. Any such new programs must be compatible with the staffing plans of the Department and/or Faculties concerned.

H. Where justified, and after careful examination, some deviation from the course pattern set out in FHB III: 6.7 - 6.11 may be allowed.

I. The Undergraduate Program Committee shall be responsible for approval of final calendar statements for new cross-disciplinary programs, and for ensuring that there is final agreement by participating Departments. If, as a result of disagreement at this stage, major program changes result, the Undergraduate Program Committee should ensure that that altered program is consistent with items B to H above.

Senate 247

7.10 Limitation of Undergraduate Enrolments

7.10.1 Course Enrolment Limitations

In principle, Brock University courses are open to all potential students who have the necessary academic prerequisites. In practice, however, every individual course has an enrolment limit based on considerations of timetabling, space, equipment, availability of qualified teaching personnel, budget and nature of the subject matter itself. Senate is ultimately responsible for establishing policies, guidelines and priorities on course limitations, but it the responsibility of the Dean of the Faculty, in consultation with Department Chairs and Program Directors, to implement those policies and guidelines to the extent possible.

A. Enrolment limits in scheduling of courses should reflect:

i) the number of students for whom the course is required for completion of degree requirements;

ii) the number of students for whom the course is a recommended elective;

iii)the number of students in cognate disciplines for whom the course is a preferred elective;

iv) the number of students in other programs of the University who find the course potentially interesting;

v) the number and variety of other courses being offered in the Department/Program and the recommended enrolment limits for each;

vi) the expected availability of the course in other terms.

B. The procedures adopted to limit accessibility to courses should:

i) be as fair as possible to all qualified students, both full- and part-time;

ii) not set unduly cumbersome or time-consuming administrative procedures on the Department or Faculty, or on the Office of the Registrar;

iii) be well publicized so students are aware of them.

7.10.2 Administrative Procedures

A. For each course planned for an academic session, the Department Chair shall recommend to the Dean a realistic estimate of the number of students for whom the course should be offered, the basis for the estimate, and the procedures whereby the limitation will be achieved.

B. Following consultation and discussion with the Department Chair, the Dean will establish an approved limitation for each course. The Office of the Registrar will be informed of each limitation so it may be incorporated into the timetable and classroom scheduling.

C. When space and timetabling considerations make it impossible to schedule a course in a classroom of sufficient size to accommodate the estimated enrolment, the Office of the Registrar will consult with the Dean who has the authority to set priorities for courses within the Faculty. When it is necessary to resolve conflicts involving courses in different Faculties, both Deans will be consulted. In the event conflicts cannot be resolved by the Deans, the Vice-President (Academic) will make any final decision as required.

D. Before the end of each academic year, the Dean of each Faculty will inform the Undergraduate Program Committee of course size limitations with the Faculty. That Committee may include in its annual report to Senate any observations or concerns it may have about the limitations and may recommend revisions to policies and guidelines on such limitations.

7.10.3 Guidelines on Procedures for Achieving Limitations in Courses

A. In cases in which a course is required of majors in a program, sufficient spaces should be provided so that majors may register in the course at an appropriate time in their program, and registration may be on a priority basis. Majors, combined majors, and students from other Departments/Programs who are required to take specific course as part of their major to be treated the same.

B. Where a course is optional or elective, the following options should be considered before resorting to registration on a first-come, first-serve basis:

i) requiring a specified grade in all required courses taken in the previous year;

ii) requiring a specified grade in some designated courses taken in the previous year;

iii) requiring a specified number of Year 1 credits before entering a Year 2 course, requiring a specified number of Year 2 credits before entering a Year 3 course, etc.;

iv) restricting the course to student who have taken fewer than some specified number of courses in the major.

C. In planning enrolment limitations for optional or elective courses in programs, care must be taken to provide sufficient total spaces so majors will be able to register at appropriate time in at least the minimum number of such courses required for their program. Registration priority should be given to students who have not already completed the minimum number of such courses required for their program.

7.10.4 Limited Enrolment Programs

Academic programs at Brock University are normally open to all academically qualified students. In exceptional circumstances, however, it may be necessary to limit the number of students accepted into a specific Pass, BA with Major, a BSc with Major, a BPhEd with Major, a BRLS with Major, a BSM with Major, a BKin or a BBA degree and/or Honours undergraduate major (or joint major) program. It is the responsibility of Senate to determine whether circumstances warrant a program limit and if so the appropriate number of students which can be accommodated. A Department or Program seeking permission to limit majors should propose to the Undergraduate Program Committee a process of "application to major", including the justification for limitations, a recommended numerical limit, and the criteria by which students will be accepted. The Undergraduate Program Committee must then makes its recommendation to Senate.

A. A limit to enrolment in a program should be considered only when one or more of the following circumstances apply:

i) there exists a significant limitation on available facilities needed for instruction in courses required by all majors (e.g., gymnasium space, science labs, language labs, rehearsal halls, studio space, etc.);

ii) there exists a limitation on available opportunities for ancillary activities required by majors (e.g., co-operative studies placements, field trip places, and facilities needed for operating extra-curricular practices, etc.);

iii) there exists a limitation of available qualified faculty and instructional personnel (this should only apply in the event that teaching loads, research timetables, and other working conditions cannot be rearranged to the satisfaction of relevant parties).

B. Once students have been admitted to a specific Pass, BA with Major, a BSc with Major, a BPhEd with Major, a BRLS with Major, a BSM with Major, a BKin or a BBA degree or Honours program, they may not be prevented from completing that program solely for reasons of a limit on spaces in upper years of the program. Normally application for admission to a limited enrolment program shall occur no later than the beginning of the second year.

C. The Department may require for admission to a limited enrolment program a minimum acceptable grade in all or some first year courses for acceptance to the major, but should clearly indicate in the Calendar and other information materials that a higher average may be necessary.

D. The Department must publish the minimum requirements for acceptance to the major program as well as the process of "application to major" in the Calendar under it program requirements.

E. Once accepted to the particular limited enrolment program, progress through the program to completion should be contingent upon achievement of a specific overall average.

Senate 410, 450, 457

8. Research Ethics

8.1 Statement of Principles of Research Ethics

8.1.1

This policy applies to all research conducted by faculty, staff, and students of Brock University, regardless of where the research is conducted or whether it is for academic publication or internal use only. It also applies to research conducted on Brock premises by researchers who are not members of the Brock community.

8.1.2

In general, it is expected that members of the Brock University community will pursue their research activities in a manner that is consistent with the highest standards of ethical and scholarly practice.

8.1.3

Research projects should be selected, funding should be accepted and the research should be conducted with due consideration for University policies and guidelines. Research projects involving human participants shall be carried out in accordance with the Tri-Council Policy Statement on Ethical Conduct for Research Involving Humans and shall be subject to review by the Research Ethics Board (REB). Research projects involving animals shall be carried out in accordance with the Principles of Ethical Research with Animals and shall be subject to review by the Animal Care Committee.

8.1.4

It is expected that data and research materials will be gathered and handled in a manner consistent with the highest standards of ethical and scholarly practice. Fraud, falsification of data, and other forms of academic dishonesty shall not be condoned.

8.1.5

Original data should be retained in a secure environment normally by the Principal Investigator for a reasonable period.

8.1.6

Decisions about how, when, and where to publish data and any conclusions derived there from should be taken jointly by all who have made a significant intellectual contribution to its accumulation and analysis. Faculty members should not, except in unusual circumstances, enter into any agreement that restricts their freedom to publish the results of research carried out in their capacity as University employees.

8.1.7

It is recognized that research in many disciplines is a collaborative effort that may involve students, staff and faculty. If they wish, all who have made a significant intellectual contribution to the research activity should be included as authors of its publication. All assistance in the research, including the gathering of data, should be appropriately acknowledged.

8.1.8

Any dispute or allegation of misconduct with regard to research ethics must be dealt with promptly. Disputes and allegations of misconduct involving members of faculty shall be handled in accordance with the terms of the Collective Agreement between Brock University and the Brock University Faculty Association. For disputes and allegations of misconduct involving other than faculty members, attempts should be made to resolve the matter by reasonable discussion among those involved. If such attempts fail, the Chairs of the Departments or academic units involved shall act as mediators to investigate and attempt to resolve the matter. If for any reason any party involved in the dispute should object to mediation by the Chair, either the Dean of the appropriate faculty or the Vice-President, Academic, shall be asked to nominate a senior researcher, who is acceptable to all parties, to act as mediator.

                 
8.2 Human Research Policy Statement

The fundamental imperative of research involving human participants is respect for human dignity  and well-being. To this end, Brock University endorses the principles set out in the Tri-Council Policy Statement: Ethical Conduct for Research Involving Humans (TCPS) as approved and amended by the Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR), the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada (NSERC), and the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada (SSHRC).
 

8.2.1 Human Research at Brock

 

(a) At Brock University, human research refers to activities where data from human participants are used as part of an undertaking intended to extend knowledge through a disciplined inquiry or systematic investigation. Human participants are those individuals whose data, or responses to interventions, stimuli, or questions by the researcher, are relevant to answering the research question. The definition of human participant research also extends to research involving human biological materials from persons living or dead.

(b) All human participant research must undergo ethics review prior to commencing and receive clearance from a Brock University Research Ethics Board regardless of whether the procedures used are invasive or non-invasive. This policy applies to funded and non-funded research involving human participants conducted in any location on or off campus by Brock University faculty, staff, graduate students, undergraduate students and to anyone conducting research under the auspices or within the jurisdiction of Brock University, that is, where

i. the research involves the use of the institution’s resources (e.g., physical space not typically open to the public, staff time, access to information not generally available to the public), and/or

ii. the research involves collaboration with anyone affiliated with the institution. This does not include participants who may be affiliated with the institution but are recruited without the involvement of the institution (e.g., through a news media advertisement or through an email to a publicly accessible email address).
 
(c) Failure on behalf of researchers to adhere to Brock University’s human research ethics policies and procedures will result in an investigation according to REB compliance procedures and may constitute misconduct under the Brock University Research and Scholarship Integrity Policy.
 
Senate 598
 
8.2.2 Responsibilities of the Vice-President, Research
 
The responsibility for upholding the TCPS is entrusted on behalf of the university to the Office of the Vice-President, Research (VPR). The VPR is responsible for the implementation of this policy through the Bioscience Research Ethics Board (BREB) and the Social Science Research Ethics Board (SREB), hereafter referred to as the REBs. The VPR shall (a) appoint members of Brock University’s REBs, (b) provide administrative support in the form of financial and human resources for ethics review and for educating the university community about human ethics, and (c) provide an appeal mechanism for ethics review. 
 
8.2.3 Responsibilities of the REBs
 
(a) Brock University has mandated its REBs to ensure that all research involving human participants is in compliance with the TCPS as a minimum standard, other recognized guidelines when relevant (e.g., Health Canada’s Food and Drug Regulations; the International Conference on Harmonisation Good Clinical Practice: Consolidated Guideline; The U.S. Food and Drug Administration; the Office for Human Research Protections, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services; the Assisted Human Reproduction Act; The Updated Guidelines for Human Pluripotent Stem Cell Research) and applicable laws and regulations of the Province of Ontario and of Canada, as they pertain to ethical conduct of research involving humans.

(b) The REBs are empowered to ensure that all research involving humans conducted under the auspices or within the jurisdiction of Brock University is ethical, and is conducted in accordance with this policy. As such, a REB may accept, reject, or propose modifications to any proposed or ongoing research that is subject to REB review, pursuant to Brock standards. A REB also has the authority to suspend any ongoing research under its purview that is deemed to pose an unacceptable risk of harm to participants or in which the principal researcher has not complied with Brock University policies and procedures related to the ethical conduct of research involving humans. A decision of a REB to disallow research on ethical grounds, unless reversed on reconsideration by that REB, may only be reversed through the REB appeal process. Decisions shall be final and binding in all respects for any appeal of an REB decision.

(c) The REBs shall have regular meetings to discharge their responsibilities, to ensure adequate discussion of, and effective decision-making about, research proposals and to support the collective education of REB members. Quorum at REB meetings shall reflect the minimum REB membership requirements as outlined in the TCPS.

(d) The REBs are responsible for developing guidelines and procedures for the ethics review process, and for revising these regularly in response to changing societal values, evolution in the area of research ethics, and evolving provincial, federal and professional ethics requirements. Details of Brock’s REBs and research review procedures are available from the Research Ethics Office.
 
8.2.4 Responsibilities of the Research Ethics Office
 
The Brock University Research Ethics Office (REO) provides centralized administration associated with the REBs and the research ethics operation at Brock, and develops and delivers educational programs and materials to Brock students, staff, and faculty involved in human research.

8.2.5 Reporting Structures
 
The Research and Scholarship Policy Committee of Senate reviews and advises on research ethics policy (I:9.12.1). The REBs shall report to this committee, at minimum, annually on workload, regulations, and other issues as may arise. In addition, the REBs and the REO shall report to the VPR, at minimum, annually on administrative matters. However, the ethics review process itself must be independent from institutional agenda or pressures.

Senate 197, 306, 461, 470, 515, 526, 586, 593

8.3 Policy Statement: Animal Care and Use

Preamble - Foundation Statement

Research and teaching activities involving animals are critical to the mission of Brock University and the moral commitment of the University to the appropriate care of, and respect for, the animals involved is central to this policy and its procedures.

External sponsors of research require an institutional review of research involving animals as a condition of the award of research funding. As an Ontario university, Brock is subject to the Animals for Research Act (Ontario) (R.S.O. 1990, CHAPTER A.22), as amended, and its Regulations. Moreover, as a recipient of research funding from the federal granting councils, Brock "must adhere to the policies and guidelines of the Canadian Council on Animal Care" (CCAC). Formal responsibility for ensuring the humane care and use of animals in all University teaching and research programs is mandated both by the Animals for Research Act and by the guidelines of the Canadian Council on Animal Care and is delegated to the Animal Care and Use Committee (ACUC) which evaluates all activities involving animals within a framework of provincial legislation and national and international standards.

This policy covers all species of animals as defined by the CCAC guidelines, as amended from time to time, and the Animals for Research Act (Ontario), as amended from time to time. The definition of animal, for the purposes of this policy, shall normally mean a live, non-human vertebrate.

The Animal Care Policy and Procedures is intended for application within the context of academic freedom which is the right to examine, question, teach and learn without deference to prescribed doctrine or authority (Brock University-Brock University Faculty Association Collective Agreement, Article 11). Nothing in this policy or its procedures replaces or diminishes this fundamental principle. At the same time, the academic, scientific and moral reputation of the University depends on the practice of academic freedom within defined ethical limits. This policy identifies such constraints in relation to the care and use of animals in University teaching and research programs.

Brock University adheres to the CCAC tenet that "The use of animals in research and teaching is acceptable only if it promises to contribute to understanding of fundamental principles, or to the development of knowledge that can reasonably be expected to benefit humans or animals. Animals should be used only if the researcher's or instructor's best efforts to find an alternative have failed. A continuing sharing of knowledge, review of the literature, and adherence to the Russell-Burch "3R" tenets of "Replacement, Reduction and Refinement" are also requisites. Those using animals should employ the most humane methods on the minimum number of appropriate animals necessary to obtain valid information".

Senate 362, 388, 554

Click here for full policy and procedures

9. Examination

9.1 General

Students are required to be present for formally scheduled examinations during the regular examination periods.  Where necessary, students may also be required to be present for midterm examinations outside of normally scheduled class time.

Senate 617

9.1.1

Written progress and final examinations shall normally be scheduled and administered by the Office of the Registrar, and take place under formal conditions during a specially-scheduled examination period. The Dean may, however, authorize a different pattern where appropriate upon application by the instructor at the time of submission of the course grading scheme.

Senate 34, 77, 283, 332, 407, 506, 589

Out of class midterm examinations may be scheduled at the instructor's discretion at times outside of normally scheduled classes, after 6:00 p.m. on Fridays and/or on weekends.  Instructors are encouraged to arrange midterm room bookings through the Office of the Registrar.  Instructors must make accommodations for students with disabilities and/or for students with midterm exam timetabling conflicts with other courses.  Students with other extenuating circumstances may consult with the instructor.  (See FHB III 9.4.1.)

Senate 617

9.1.2

A. The style and duration of a University examination (e.g., closed or open book; essay or multiple-choice questions) shall normally be at the discretion of the individual instructor. The duration in hours and minutes of a University Examination shall appear at the top of the examination paper. (See FHB III: 9.1.11.)

B. The following statements shall routinely be placed on final examination scripts:

- No examination aids other than those specified on the examination scripts are permitted (this regulation does not preclude special arrangements being made for students with disabilities). Translation dictionaries (e.g., English-French) or other dictionaries (thesaurus, definitions, technical) are not allowed unless specified by the instructor and indicated on the examination paper.

Senate 542

- use or possession of unauthorized materials will automatically result in the award of a zero grade for this examination.

and in some cases where the following is appropriate:

- a minimum of xx percent must be obtained on this final examination in order to achieve a passing grade in the course. Senate 20, 176, 343, 413, 506

9.1.3

As early as appropriate in any academic session, Chairs of Departments, or senior and experienced members in Departments, shall discuss with their less experienced colleagues such matters as teaching methods, setting of examinations and marking of examinations. Senate 20

9.1.4

A. The Chair must ensure that question papers remain confidential and to that end are delivered by hand to the Office of the Registrar.

B. The Departments concerned shall arrange for, and bear the cost of, the printing of all examinations not received by the Office of the Registrar by the deadline for submission.

C.

a) Faculty are encouraged to deposit copies of their university examinations (as defined in III: 9.1.1) on reserve in the Library. Examinations not for deposit on reserve must be clearly so marked on the masthead of the first page.

b) Prior to the start of examinations, one copy of every examination will be forwarded by Departments to the Registrar who will be responsible for the transfer to the Library of examinations to be placed on reserve.

c) One copy of the examination will be forwarded by the Registrar to the Library for scanning and deposit on electronic reserve for a period of five years. Once scanned, examinations will be shredded. Access to electronic examinations will be restricted to currently registered Brock students, faculty and staff.

d) Faculty or departments who wish to have their examinations removed from electronic reserve prior to the five-year timeline should contact Loan Services.

Senate 407, 554, 556

D. The Chair shall, one week prior to the beginning of examinations, supply the Office of the Registrar with appropriate lists of proctors (including instructors who will be present) for each examination on the assumption that there shall be one proctor per 50 students in a room.

Senate 20, 283, 332, 407

9.1.5 Grade Report

Final grade reports must be initialled by the Department Chair or Program Director before submission to the Office of the Registrar. Any alteration to the grade report must be agreed to by the instructor and Chair or Director. In case of disagreement the Dean shall decide the matter.

Senate 20, 407, 410

9.1.6

A. Instructors and proctors should arrive one half hour prior to the start of an examination to allow time for all examination materials to be distributed and for the resolution of any problems related to the examination.

Senate 344

B. All University Examinations being written concurrently in a given room should begin simultaneously. In addition, it is desirable that students writing examinations of different lengths should be segregated in different rooms. A student shall not be permitted to enter a room in which University Examinations are being written if the student arrives more than 30 minutes after the commencement of writing, nor shall a student be permitted to leave such a room within the first 30 minutes or within the last 10 minutes of the examination.

9.1.7

Smoking and talking are not permitted in examination rooms.

Senate 4

9.1.8

When a course is given in more than one section in any given term, it is the responsibility of the Department Chair and the instructors involved to ensure that the sections are substantially the same in content. This means that the materials covered in the different sections, with some possible minor variations of emphasis, will be similar, and that all sections of the course will write comparable examinations. Tutorial courses, directed research courses and Honours thesis courses shall be exempted from this regulation.

Senate 84, 105, 126, 210, 256, 257, 332, 343

9.1.9

A. The responsibility for the conduct of examinations shall rest with the Registrar who shall appoint a Chief Invigilator and two Assistant Invigilators for each examination session.

B. During the examination period, the Chief Invigilator will be responsible for the general conduct and security of all examinations in that session regardless of locale:

i) Any irregularities occurring during the conduct of examinations must be reported immediately by the Chief Invigilator to the Registrar for follow-up with the appropriate Dean.

ii) One hour prior to the examination, the Chief Invigilator must make certain that special equipment needs have been provided for in locations other than the gymnasiums and that examination scripts and answer booklets have been delivered to the Assistant Invigilator in each gymnasium for distribution to the appropriate instructors.

iii)One-half hour prior to the examination, the Chief Invigilator must check with the Office of the Registrar to ascertain that examination materials have been picked up by instructors for examinations to be held outside the gymnasiums. Should any problems be apparent, the Chief Invigilator should be prepared to set up and proctor such examinations until relief can be obtained.

iv) During the first hour of the examination, the Chief Invigilator must check that examinations are in progress in each designated location and collect the examination attendance cards from each.

C. Duties of the Assistant Invigilator

One Assistant Invigilator will be posted in each gymnasium to supervise the enforcement of examination rules and regulations and to aid instructors and proctors in setting up for examinations.

i) The Assistant Invigilator will determine and post all row assignments and provide all examination scripts to instructors and proctors for distribution.

ii) In the event that an instructor does not appear within 20 minutes of the start of the examination, the Assistant Invigilator will see to the distribution of the necessary examination materials for that course.

iii) The Assistant Invigilator will make all announcements in the examination room and will be responsible for the collection and sorting of examination attendance cards, and will assure, in conjunction with faculty, that proctors are working effectively.

D. Duties of Instructors

It is expected that at least one instructor in the course (not a seminar leader or lab demonstrator) will be present for the duration of the examination:

i) Instructors are responsible for the distribution of examination materials to their students.

ii) In order to prevent cheating, it is expected that instructors will be prepared to observe the conduct of students, especially those who are sitting in close proximity to their own.

E. Duties of Proctors

Proctors are expected to provide assistance in setting up the examination room and in supervising the conduct of the examination in accordance with duties assigned by the Assistant Invigilator.

Senate 283

9.1.10

An instructor may require a student to take a class test or examination, as opposed to an individual test or examination, only during:

a) the regular class periods of his/her course;

b) the formally scheduled examination period; or

c) a special examination period, scheduled in the academic timetable and not conflicting with regular class periods or other examinations.

No student may be required to write an examination or test in a time period which conflicts with any of his/her other classes.

Laboratory tests worth no more than 20 percent of a student's final grade may be scheduled, during a student's regularly timetabled laboratory period, in the last week of a term, but only under extreme, extenuating circumstances, with permission of the Dean, will class tests or examinations worth more than 5 percent of the course grade be permitted in the final two weeks of each term.

Senate 169, 186, 243, 258, 301, 470

9.1.11

The scheduled duration of a University Examination shall normally be three hours and not less than two hours. Exceptions to this regulation must be approved by the Dean by the end of the first two weeks of classes to correspond to the deadline for submission of the grading scheme.

Senate 228, 332, 407, 589

9.1.12

Although attempts will be made to minimize consecutive examinations or two examinations in one day, this possibility cannot be eliminated.

Two examinations in large multiple-section courses may be required by the Office of the Registrar. In such cases the Department shall submit two equivalent examinations.

Senate 228, 256, 257

9.1.13

If a situation should arise such that even with the above relaxation of constraints, a timetable is impossible, then two-hour progress and half credit course examinations may be required along with four two-hour slots per day. This option must be approved in any year by the Undergraduate Student Affairs Committee before its implementation.

Senate 228, 332

9.1.14

After appropriate consultation, the Registrar or the Co-ordinator of Services for Students with Disabilities may authorize appropriate modifications to examination procedures which may include the following: granting additional time to complete an exam, permitting oral responses to examination questions, permitting the student to use aids such as a word processor or tape recorder.

Senate 355

9.2 Examinations

9.2.1 Final Examinations

Final examinations may be considered as an integral part of courses, much as seminars or lectures, particularly in courses numbered 1(alpha)00-1(alpha)99.  It is the responsibility of the Department/Centre to determine whether or not a final examination is required (see FHB III: 10.1.4).

Senate 68, 77, 499 9.2.2, 606 

Final examinations for all courses where an examination is required shall be written at the end of the term in which they are taken, and normally within the formal examination period.

Senate 126, 606

9.2.3 Return of Final Course Grades

Final course grades, with the exception of Summer Session, are to be returned within seven working days of the examination date. In the case of Summer Session, the period would normally be three working days. For courses which do not have a final examination scheduled during the examination period, final grades must be submitted to the Office of the Registrar within seven working days after the end of the examination period. Exceptions should be determined by agreement between the Dean and the Department Chair and then conveyed to the Office of the Registrar. Grades received after this period will automatically have a grade of NR (Not Reported) recorded for the course.

Senate 143, 172, 279, 288

9.2.4 Retention of Papers

When an instructor transmits grades for a course to the Office of the Registrar, the examination scripts shall be turned over by the instructor to the Department/Program for safekeeping for a period of not less than six months. After that time, they must be shredded. It is the responsibility of each Department/Program to ensure that a breakdown of each student's grade used in the determination of the final grade is available, upon request, for twelve months after the completion of the course.

Senate 20, 379, 413

9.2.5 Inspection of Papers

Students have a right to inspect their Final Examination papers under faculty supervision. Faculty must return final examination papers to the Department/Program for safekeeping in accordance with FHB III: 9.2.4.

Senate 97, 413

9.2.6 Final Grades for First-Term Half Credit Courses

A. In accordance with FHB III: 11.9.1, grades are unofficial until they have been approved by Senate and released by the Office of the Registrar. However, to facilitate registration, final grades must be communicated to students by Instructors no later than the final date for submission of grades. The method of communication shall be left to the discretion of the Instructor but in compliance with the University access to student records and disclosure of information policy, which would exclude the posting of grades in a public place such as an office door or bulletin board.

B. Final grades for first-term half credit courses are to be reported to the Office of the Registrar in accordance with FHB III: 9.2.3, except for courses which are so organized that grades cannot be submitted until the end of the academic session. In such cases, the Office of the Registrar is to be informed. Such exemptions must be approved by the Dean. A grade of NR will be reported to the student for these half courses.

Senate 179, 332, 424, 554, 589

9.2.7 Report to Faculty

At the earliest possible opportunity after the end of the academic session, the Office of the Registrar will provide, to Deans and Department Chairs, the following statistical information:

a) 1(alpha)00 to 1(alpha)99 courses Final Grades - average percent; and

b) 1(alpha)00 to 1(alpha)99 courses Final Grades - grade distribution report by course.

Senate 20, 299, 332, 554

9.3 Progress (Midyear) Examinations - Full Credit Courses

9.3.1 Progress Examinations

A. Progress examinations may be required in any full credit courses. They shall be administered at the mid-point of the academic session.

Senate 128, 271, 332, 606

9.3.2 Failure to Write Scheduled Progress Exam

A student who fails to write a scheduled progress exam for a legitimate reason must make arrangements to satisfy course requirements with the instructor. Any arrangements made, including make-up exams, are strictly at the discretion of the instructor and Department Chair. (See FHB III: 9.4.1)

Senate 209

9.3.3 Exam Script

Any exam written at any time other than the scheduled exam must have a different exam script from that used in the scheduled exam.

Senate 209

9.3.4 Transmission of Grades

A. Departments shall notify students of their Progress Examination results no later than the end of the first week in the second half of the course. The marked Progress Examination scripts shall be returned as soon as possible, indicating the numerical grades for each answer and for the paper as a whole.

B. Departments shall notify the Office of the Registrar, no later than the end of the first week in the second half of the course, of those students who have failed a Progress Examination. The Office of the Registrar shall tabulate these data and contact those students who have failed three or more Progress Examinations and/or first-term half credit courses.

C. In compliance with the University Access to Student Records and Disclosure of Information Policy, students should be directed to access their grades through Student Self Serve or other secure means, such as WebCT. Grades are unofficial until released by the Office of the Registrar.

Senate 8, 20, 299, 424, 554

9.4 Deferred Examinations

9.4.1 Permission to Write

1. If a student is unable to write a formally scheduled examination, or having begun the exam, is unable to complete it, for reasons of ill-health, with supporting documentation, a Deferred Examination will be granted. Requests made on the basis of compassionate grounds or on the grounds of extenuating circumstances will be judged on a case by case basis.

2. It is the University's policy to accept medical certificates from qualified medical practitioners attesting to a student's inability to write a test, examination, etc. due to an incapacitating medical condition at the time of the scheduled test, examination etc. The Department may, at its discretion, request more detailed documentation in instant cases.

3. Any medical request for a Deferred Examination must be supported by a completed Brock University Student Medical Certificate or Brock University Student Health Services Medical Certificate (and include any relevant medical documentation) certifying that the student was not capable of attempting the examination at the scheduled date and time.

4. A student must first contact the instructor for permission to write a Deferred Examination. Any such application must be accompanied by required supporting documentation and must be submitted within seven days of the examintion.

5. If the student is not able to contact the course instructor or if the course instructor is not willing to give the student permission to write a Deferred Examination, within ten days of the examination, application may be made to the Chair/Director of the Department/Program for permission to write a Deferred Examination.

6. If not satisfied with the outcome of the request, the student may then refer the matter to the Dean of the Faculty offering the course.

7. If the student is not satisfied with the decision of the Dean, the student may then appeal to the Student Appeals Board.

8. Students unable to write a formally scheduled examination because of religious obligations may request an academic accommodation for religious obligations (see FHB III: 10.5).

Senate 12, 77, 209, 240, 332, 393, 441, 457, 536, 555

9.4.2 Time for Completion of Deferred Examinations

Deferred final exams for Fall Term half credit courses will be written no later than the subsequent July 31; for Fall/Winter Session courses and Winter Term courses, no later than the subsequent August 31; for Spring and Summer Session courses, no later than the subsequent December 31.

Senate 128, 209, 393

9.4.3 Aegrotat Standing

Definition: Aegrotat standing is the granting of credit for a course(s), based on the course work already completed, when no further assessment - for example, a deferred examination - is considered feasible because of illness or other extenuating circumstances beyond the student's control.

Students may only be granted Aegrotat Standing with the approval of the Dean of the faculty offering the course.

Senate 52, 128, 393

9.5 Challenges for Credit

9.5.1

Challenge for Credit is a policy that enables a student to gain undergraduate academic credit for his or her own learning and experience outside university. As a University which heavily supports part-time study, such a procedure recognizes that many people have opportunities in their place of employment to gain skills and knowledge equivalent to university courses. Challenge for Credit enables the learning and experience to be evaluated according to Brock's standards of achievement and give academic credit towards a Brock degree.

9.5.2

Challenge for Credit is designed to provide credit at the undergraduate university level for skills acquired elsewhere. It is not normally open to instructional staff in their courses except by special appeal to the Committee on Appeals. It is not designed to give credit for high school instruction or previous university instruction in the same area and level. Credit is granted only for those courses which are in the Brock Calendar and which thus have been approved by the Undergraduate Program Committee, after the student has demonstrated, to the satisfaction of the Department concerned, his/her ability.

Senate 243

9.5.3

Challenge for Credit is subject to departmental academic regulations so that it should not be assumed that all courses in all disciplines will be subject to challenge. Departments have a right, if they desire, to require that their normal prerequisites for a course be met, either by challenge or by taking that course. Courses available for challenge may be noted in the Calendar. The following general regulations also apply:

a) Challenge for Credit is available only to students formally admitted to and registered in a program leading to a degree, diploma or certificate. Special students are not eligible to challenge for credit.

b) A maximum of five credits towards a Brock BA, BSc, BAcc, BBA, BCB, BBE, BMus, BPhEd, BRLS or BSM degree may be acquired by challenge at Brock or elsewhere. A maximum of one credit may be obtained towards a certificate. Challenges may not be included in the minimum of five Brock credits required for a Brock degree.

c) A challenge credit may not be used as a substitute for grade raising or special exams, or to replace a failed course.

d) A student may not challenge a course (or its equivalent) in which he or she is, or has been previously registered in any degree program, or which he or she has already challenged.

e) The passing grade for a Challenge for Credit is a "C" but no numeric grade will appear on the transcript. Instead, the symbol CH will be used to represent a successful challenge. Challenge grades are therefore not computed in graduating averages and are not used in evaluating honours or scholarship standing. Failures will also be noted on the transcript.

f) Evaluation of a student challenging for credit in a course will be the responsibility of the Department/Program concerned and should normally consist of a variety of types of work, exam, essays, etc., and shall be completed within 60 days of the acceptance of the challenge. If possible, a written final exam should be taken in the normal exam period.

Senate 290, 430

9.5.4 How to Challenge for Credit

A. A student should contact the Office of the Registrar and fill out a challenge application form. (The student may wish to discuss the challenge informally with the Department prior to this step.) The Office of the Registrar will forward the application to the appropriate Department which must decide whether or not to accept the challenge. The Department may require documentary material from the student or an interview, before making its decision.

B. If the Department accepts the challenge, the student is eligible to register for the examination at the Office of the Registrar and pay a fee. A student may not withdraw the challenge after this step, and failure to sit for a challenge examination subsequent to a registration represents a failed challenge. It is the student's responsibility to be fully informed prior to registration, of the time and nature of the evaluation which may also include one or more of the following: a written exam paper or papers, an essay or essays, the submission of a substantial body of work or a portfolio, an oral examination, or a laboratory test.

Senate 236
Board: June 24/80

10. Evaluation

10.1 Duties of the Instructor

10.1.1

Evaluation of a student's performance in a course will be determined by employing such indices as examinations, seminar and classroom participation, papers, lab and studio activities, peer evaluation and any other normal class assignments. For each course, the grading scheme will reflect a reasonable diversity of these methods as is appropriate to the subject matter.

Senate 76, 256, 332, 343, 413

10.1.2

Peer evaluation cannot count for more than 25 percent of the final grade.

Senate 413, 606

10.1.3

A. At the beginning of each course, students will be advised in writing of the proposed manner in which evaluation will be carried out in each course. A student is expected to attend all lectures, discussion groups, seminars and laboratory periods, and examinations of the courses in which registered. Instructors must inform students about the relationship between attendance and their course grades early in each session. This should be indicated on the course outline and on the Composition of Final Grade Form, which shall be deposited with the appropriate Dean no later than the last date for course change.

B. At the beginning of each course, students shall be advised in writing of the assignments required of them and the due dates of such assignments. Due dates for assignments must not be scheduled after the last day of final examinations for the term. Exceptions should be rare and must be granted by the Dean in consultation with the Chair/Director, and reported to the Registrar's Office.

C. Any penalties to be levied for late submission of an assignment must be transmitted to students in writing well before the due date of the assignment.

D. To obtain standing in a course a student must complete the necessary term work, tests and final examination, where the latter is required, to the satisfaction of the Department/Centre. Details concerning how this will affect the final grade must be communicated to the student before the last date for deposition of grading schemes (see FHB III: 10.1.3A).

E.  Whenever and wherever reasonably possible, instructors shall be responsible for communicating a minimum of 15 percent of the final course grade to all students registered in courses no later than the week prior to the last date for withdrawal without academic penalty. In cases where, due to the nature of the course, this requirement cannot be met, the instructor shall inform students in the course syllabus.

F.  At the beginning of each course, instructors shall include in course outlines, the date for withdrawal without academic penalty, and the date by which they may expect to receive notification of 15 percent of their final grade.

G.  At the beginning of each course, students will be advised in writing, whether a phrase matching system (e.g., Turnitin.com) will be used. The information should be included on the course outline and on the Composition of Final Grade form, which shall be deposited with the appropriate Dean no later than the last date for course change.

Senate 88, 94, 101, 171, 200, 236, 256, 259, 288, 344, 407, 413, 478, 512, 517, 568, 606

10.1.4

To permit the publication and distribution of examination schedules prior to the beginning of term, the Office of the Registrar shall be notified by the Chair/Director, when class timetable information is collected, of all courses requiring progress and/or final examinations scheduled by the Office of the Registrar.

Senate 76, 200, 314, 615

10.1.5

In a course where an instructor has assistance in evaluation, it remains the instructor's responsibility to make certain the evaluation is carried out fairly.

Senate 76

10.1.6

At the end of the academic year, each instructor shall return to the Office of the Registrar, final grades for all students based on the whole year's work. The grades consist of two parts:

a) a numerical grade; and

b) the equivalent letter grade (see FHB: 10.3).

Senate 17, 28

10.1.7

After grades have been transmitted to the Office of the Registrar they may not be changed except (a) by submission of a Grade Change Form signed by the instructor, and the Chair/Director; (b) when a Dean or Associate Dean notifies the Office of the Registrar that a grade change represents a penalty for academic misconduct. A grade change assigned by a Dean or Associate Dean shall take precedence in a case of Academic Misconduct.

Senate 22, 407, 476, 539

10.2 Standards Applying to Letter Grades

10.2.1 Course Goals and Prerequisites

A. The academic unit will decide on the goals of the courses it offers, with due regard to the prerequisites for the course, the level of each course, and the needs of other courses for which it is a prerequisite. These goals should be expressed in terms of the degree level expectations agreed upon by the academic unit. 

Senate 589

Admission standards and prerequisites for each course should be so established that a student allowed to register in the course will have a reasonable chance of succeeding. If an exception is made by admitting a student who is highly-motivated but not well-prepared, the student must be informed that proceeding is at the student's own risk.

Senate 182

10.2.2 Grading Standards

A. The final grade awarded in a course shall be determined on the basis of the goals established for that course.  Where no such explicit standards have been prepared and recorded, the general standards described below shall govern implicitly. The standards should be appropriate to the level of the course, as indicated by its course number (rather than to the level of the student). The Undergraduate Program Committee, before recommending approval of a course, may require an explicit statement of goals and standards of the Academic Unit.

Senate 589

The Grade of A

The marks of 90 to 100 are reserved for students where work is of outstanding quality that provides clear evidence of a rare talent for the subject and of an original and/or incisive mind.

The marks of 80 to 89 are awarded to students for excellent, comprehensive, accurate work in which evidence of a certain flair for and comprehension of the subject is clearly perceptible.

The Grade of B

The marks 70 to 79 are awarded to students who have a sound grasp of the most important goals of the course and whose work may be described as careful, craftsman like, competent and good without being distinguished.

The Grade of C

The marks of 60 to 69 are awarded to students who show average competence which falls short of the standard of a B grade through incompleteness or inaccuracy; their work may be described as adequate.

The Grade of D

The marks 50 to 59 are awarded to students who barely satisfy the minimum requirements for the course.

The Grade of F

The Grade of "F" in a course means that the student, having failed to satisfy the minimum requirements, does not receive formal credit.

Senate 568

B. In courses offered for credit towards the BEd degree (EDUC 8(alpha)xx), where inculcation of pedagogical skills and techniques, rather than academic instruction, is the central focus, grades of P1, P2, P3 and F, rather than A-F, will be awarded. The grade of P1 (Pass-First Class) will be awarded to those students who have demonstrated a real mastery of the techniques taught and who can be expected to employ them in the classroom with flair and exceptional competence; P2 (Pass-Second Class) indicates mastery of technique but some room for improvement; P3 (Pass), while a passing grade, implies skill attainments not markedly different from those of many students early in the course; F is a failure and the student receives no formal credit.

C. Prior to the signing off, if a set of grades appear atypical, Chairs/Directors may communicate information to instructors on grade distributions for individual courses, for the Academic Unit and for the University as a whole. They may thus ensure that major departures from those historical grade distributions are not created inadvertently.

Senate 589

10.2.3 Enforcement

A. The enforcement of the above standards is the responsibility of the Senate, supported by Academic Unit Chairs/Directors, Deans, and the Undergraduate Student Affairs Committee.

B. When an Academic Unit Chair/Director endorses a list of grades to be submitted to the Office of the Registrar, the Academic Unit is thereby certifying that the marking has been fair and consistent with the goals and standards of the course. If a course has an unusual distribution of grades, such as many high grades (A's) or many low grades (D's and F's), the Academic Unit should obtain from the instructor the evidence (such as explicit statements of course goals and marking schemes, examples of students' work, etc.) that the spirit of 10.2.1 above is adhered to.

Senate 589, 615

C. Irresolvable conflicts between the instructor and their Chairs/Directors and Deans regarding grade distribution may be referred to the Undergraduate Student Affairs Committee for adjudication.

Senate 182, 512, 589, 615

10.3 System of Numerical Grades

The following grades must be used for final grades submitted to the Office of the Registrar.

Overall standing is determined by the cumulative average of grades assigned for all courses taken (whether passed or failed). In all cases, the grade awarded for a repeated course will supersede the grade from the first attempt at the course, regardless of whether it is higher or lower, and will be used in computation of the student's cumulative grade average. (A student may only repeat a course once.)

 

Word GradeNumerical Grade
A80 - 100
B70 - 79
C60 - 69
D50 - 59
FAny grade below 50
INA "default" grade which must be one of the above numerical grades (Note 1)
IPIn Progress (Note 2)
CHChallenge for Credit (Note 3)
PPass (Note 4)
FFail (Note 4)
P180 - 100 (Note 5)
P270 - 79 (Note 5)
P360 - 69 (Note 5)
FAny grade below 60 (Note 5)
AGAegrotat Standing (see FHB III: 9.4.3)
NWNot Withdrawn (see FHB: III: 12.2)

Note 1

The grade "incomplete - IN" is a temporary grade assigned to a student who, because of exceptional circumstances and for reasons satisfactory to the Department, has been unable to complete some part of the term work in a course in time to have it graded by the instructor for inclusion in the final mark. This grade must be accompanied by a numerical grade, which may be any of those listed above. The grade of IN will automatically lapse eight weeks after the last day of the examination period, and the numerical grade will stand, unless both are replaced earlier by the instructor.

Note 2

IP grade can be used only for fourth year thesis, for other undergraduate project courses, and for graduate courses. In the case of undergraduate courses, if the IP has not been lifted within twelve months of the initial registration in the course, the student must re-register and pay the appropriate course fee.

Note 3

The passing grade for a Challenge for Credit is a "C" but no numeric grade will appear on the transcript. Instead, the symbol CH will be used to represent a successful challenge. Challenge grades are therefore not computed in graduating averages and are not used in evaluating honours or scholarship standing. Failures (F) will also be noted on the transcript.

Note 4

The Pass/Fail grading scheme is applicable to the Faculty of Education Teacher Education course EDUC 8F08 only and approved undergraduate courses that are clinical or practicum based.

Note 5

The P1 (Pass-First Class), P2 (Pass-Second Class), P3 (Pass) and F (Fail) grading scheme will apply to the Faculty of Education Teacher Education and In-Service courses only.

Senate 137, 140, 173, 193, 203, 236, 237, 260 294, 319, 332, 344, 393, 407, 413, 568, 615

10.4 Phrase Matching Software (e.g., Turnitin.com)

 

Instructors may take advantage of a number of different phrase matching software programs to assist them in the detection of plagiarism (e.g., Turnitin.com) during the course of evaluating essays, assignments, and other work that is required for a given course. However, if an Instructor has decided to employ such systems, students must be informed in writing at the beginning of the course (see FHB III: 10.1.3 G.).

It shall be assumed that students who remain in the course, having been informed of the use of such systems, shall have agreed to their use. However, circumstances may arise whereby a student must continue in a course despite their principled objection to participate in the use of such systems. In those cases, the Instructor must provide such students with a reasonable offline alternative to using the system such as, but not limited to:

i) Require a short reflection paper on research methodology;
ii) Require a draft bibliography prior to submission of the final work;
iii) Require the cover page and first cited page of each reference source to be photocopied and submitted with the final paper; and/or,
iv) Require the submission of specified rough notes and drafts.

The exception to the use of offline alternatives shall include courses where academic work is compared using a database that resides on the premises of Brock University and is used to measure the similarity of academic work within a specific course or program for the purposes of plagiarism detection (e.g., Computer Science).

Senate 610

 

10.5 Academic Accommodation for Religious Obligations

(i) Brock University acknowledges the pluralistic nature of the undergraduate and graduate communities such that accommodations will be made for students who, by reason of religious obligation, must miss an examination, test, assignment deadline, laboratory or other compulsory academic event.

Students requesting academic accommodation on the basis of religious obligation should make a formal, written request to their instructor(s) for alternative dates and/or means of satisfying requirements. Such requests should be made during the first two weeks of any given academic term, or as soon as possible after a need for accommodation is known to exist (i.e., posting of the examination schedule), but in no case later than second-last week of classes in that term.

(ii) When a student's presence is required prior to the date on which classes begin, any student who cannot meet this expectation of attendance for reasons of religious obligation should notify the Registrar, in advance.

(iii) Accommodation is to be worked out directly and on an individual basis between the student and the instructor(s) involved. Instructors will make accommodation in a way that avoids academic disadvantage to the student. The type of accommodation granted will vary depending on the nature, weight and timing of the work for which accommodation is sought.

(iv) In cases regarding academic accommodation of students on the basis of religious obligation, any dispute unresolved by discussion between the student and instructor may be appealed, first to the Department Chair or Director and thereafter to the Dean of the Faculty in which the student is registered. If the student is not satisfied with the decision of the Dean, the student may then appeal to the Student Appeals Board.

(v) A current list of major religious days of observation will be posted on the University Registrar's web page.

Senate 536

11. Academic Standing

11.1 Cumulative Grade Average

A. In order to determine academic standing at any time during the course of a degree, a cumulative grade average will be computed on the following basis:

Cumulative grade average = Sum of (grades ´ credit weight) / Total number of credits attempted

B. The same method is to be used to determine major or minor averages. All averages of grades are to be rounded off to the closest 1 percent.

C. Departments/Centres shall be responsible for informing the Office of the Registrar (by the deadline of each year for submission of calendar material to the Dean) which courses are to be counted in determining the major average.

D. Only courses taken at Brock will be used in determining a student's average. Courses taken on a letter of permission from Brock will be marked as Pass/Fail and will not be used in determining any student average. The Registrar's Office should include, as a note on a student's transcript, the exact name and title of the course taken on letter of permission, including the grade received at the offering institution, as provided by the granting institution.

Senate 460, 615

For the purposes of calculating and showing overall averages on the Statement of Standing for Brock students, a value of 45 percent is used for all "F" grades of 45 percent or below, and of their numerical value for "F" grades 46-49 percent.

Senate 171, 332, 393, 400, 568

11.2 Permission to Proceed

11.2.1 Definitions

Academic Review: A review of all undergraduate student performance will take place following each academic session, prior to the release of grades.

Academic Probation: Following the review of academic performance, a student is placed on academic probation when minimum academic performance requirements are not met.

Academic Suspension: Students not meeting minimum academic requirements while on academic probation will be placed on academic suspension for one year. Students readmitted following academic suspension will be required to return to studies under the regulations and program of the calendar in effect at the time of their re-registration.

Academic Debarment: Students not meeting minimum academic requirements after readmission to the University following academic suspension will be barred from further studies for a minimum of two years. Application is required and readmission is not guaranteed. Students readmitted following academic debarment will be required to return to studies under the regulations and program of the calendar in effect at the time of their re-registration; subsequent failure to meet minimum academic requirements will result in permanent debarment.

Permanent Debarment: Students not meeting minimum academic requirements after re-admission to the University following debarment will be permanently barred from further studies at Brock University. There is no appeal against Permanent Debarment.

11.2.2 Minimum Academic Requirements

Minimum academic requirements to continue studies at the University:

Students who have received grades in at least two credits or greater must have attained an overall average of at least 60 percent. Continuing students must maintain a minimum overall average of 60 percent. (Some programs may require a higher average in order to be eligible to continue studies in that program. Please consult the Undergraduate Calendar.)

Academic Probation:

Students not meeting minimum academic performance requirements (overall average of at least 60 percent) will be placed on academic probation.

Notice of academic probation will be placed on a student's Statement of Standing (but not on a student's transcript). Students will be notified that they have been placed on academic probation (i) on their academic record accessed on the student portal, and (ii) by an official Statement of Standing sent to the mailing address on the student's record, that they have been placed on academic probation.

The academic record of students placed on academic probation will be re-evaluated at the end of the session where a cumulative total of three or more credits have been attempted since being placed on academic probation.

Students must attain a minimum 60 percent overall average on total courses attempted while on academic probation to be allowed to continue.  A value of 45 will be used for "F" grades of 45 or lower, and the actual numerical value will be used for "F" grades 46-49 percent.

                                                                                                                                  Senate 606, 615

Academic Suspension:

Students who have attempted a minimum of three credited since being placed on academic probation and who do not attain the minimum academic performance requirements on all courses taken will  receive an academic suspension from studies for a minimum of one year.

                                                                                                                                 Senate 606

Notice of academic suspension will be placed on a student's Statement of Standing and on a student's transcript. Students will be notified that they have been placed on academic suspension (i) on their academic record accessed on the student portal, and (ii) by an official Statement of Standing sent to the mailing address on the student's record.

Students registered in current session courses prior to notification of academic suspension will be permitted to continue in currently registered courses.

Students receiving academic suspension will be required to apply to the Senate Student Appeals Board for readmission to the University. Application is required and re-admission is not guaranteed.

Students who can demonstrate that there were extenuating circumstances that affected their academic performance while on academic probation may request that the Senate Student Appeals Board permit them to continue their studies without sitting out the required one year academic suspension. Documentation with respect to the grounds for appeal, must be provided by the student in support of any appeal for re-admission. Students granted their request will be readmitted to the University as if they had served the one year suspension; that is, they will be placed on a second academic probation.

Students re-admitted to the University after serving an academic suspension will be considered to be on academic probation and will be required to return to studies under the regulations and program of the calendar in effect at the time of their re-registration. Courses taken at another post-secondary institution while on Academic Suspension will not be considered for transfer credit upon re-admission.

The academic record of students placed on academic probation following readmission will be re-evaluated at the end of the session where a cumulative total of three or more credits have been attempted since being placed on academic probation following readmission.  Students must attain minimum 60 percent overall average on total courses attempted while on academic probation to be allowed to continue.  In the calculation of this average a value of 45 will be used for "F" grades of 45 or lower, and the actual numeric value will be used for "F" grades 46-49 percent.

                                                                                                                              Senate 606, 615


Alternative to Academic Suspension

Students placed on academic suspension may be offered an alternative to academic suspension.  Participating students will continue on academic probation, be required to take a mandatory non-credit support course and be restricted to a maximum of three credits.  Students must successfully complete the non-credit support course, as well as attain a minimum 60 percent overall average once three credits have been attempted.  Students who do not meet these requirements will be placed on academic suspension for a minimum of one year.   This alternative to academic suspension may not be repeated.

Senate 593, 606

Academic Debarment:

Following readmission after academic suspension, students not meeting the academic performance requirements noted above will be barred from further studies for a minimum of two years.

Notice of academic debarment will be placed on a student's Statement of Standing and on a student's transcript. Students will be notified that they have been placed on academic debarment (i) on their academic record accessed on the student portal, and (ii) by an official Statement of Standing sent to the mailing address on the student's record.

                                                                                                                                   Senate 606

Students registered in current session courses prior to notification of academic suspension will be permitted to continue in currently registered courses.

Students will be required to apply to the Senate Student Appeals Board for readmission to the University following the minimum two year period of academic debarment. Application is required and readmission is not guaranteed.

Students who can demonstrate that there were extenuating circumstances which affected their academic performance while on academic probation, may request that the Senate Student Appeals Board permit them to continue their studies without sitting out the required two-year period of debarment. Documentation with respect to the grounds for appeal, must be provided by the student in support of any appeal for re-admission. Students granted their request will be readmitted to the University as if they had served the two-year debarment; that is, they will be placed on academic probation.

Students re-admitted following academic debarment will be required to return to studies under the regulations and program of the calendar in effect at the time of their re-registration; subsequent failure to meet minimum requirements will result in permanent debarment for which there is no appeal. Courses taken at another post-secondary institution while on Academic Debarment will not be considered for transfer credit upon re-admission.

Senate 393, 433, 461, 480, 501, 512, 536

11.2.3 Pre-Service Program - Faculty of Education

A candidate failing EDUC 8L09 or a candidate failing any two individual courses would be required to apply for readmission. Candidates failing one unit of Curriculum Studies or Foundation courses will be required to repeat that component. Candidates failing one of EDUC 8Y04, 8Y05, 8P06 or 8F08 or Curriculum Studies may be allowed to repeat that course without applying for readmission.

Senate 280, 294

11.2.4 Courses Extra to a Degree

A. Students wishing to augment a regular degree program by taking extra courses because of personal interest may enrol in such courses and designate them as extra courses, not to be used for credit towards that degree.

B. Students must declare a course to be extra prior to the last date for official withdrawal.

C. Students changing degree programs may declare non-applicable courses as extra to their degree program at the time of the program change.

D. Students may change the designation of major courses as extra to their program only with the permission of the Department/Centre.

E. Failed courses may only be marked as extra with the permission of the Dean of the student's Faculty.

Senate 407, 615

11.2.5

After successful completion of five credits, a student will be expected to choose an area of major concentration. A student shall normally have the right to major in any subject in which a grade of C or better was obtained, provided that program prerequisites have been met. In the case where a D was obtained in the proposed major subjects, the consent of the relevant Department/Centre is required for the student to major in that subject. Where programs have approved enrolment limits, admission is not guaranteed by attainment of minimum requirements.

Senate 554, 615

11.2.6

A. Students enrolled in a single major, combined major or Integrated Studies program are required to maintain an overall major average of 60 in order to continue in that major.

B. Only courses taken at Brock will be used in determining a student's major average.  Courses taken on a letter of permission from Brock will be marked as Pass/Fail and will not be used in determining any student average. The Registrar's Office should include, as a note on a student's transcript, the exact name and title of the course taken on letter of permission, including the grade received at the offering institution.

C. In a single major all courses from the major area of study as well as specified courses* required as part of the major program but not given by the major Department/Centre will be designated as the major courses.

D. In a combined major all courses from each area of study as well as specified courses* required as part of the combined major program but not given by either of the major Departments/Centres will be designated as major courses.

E. In an Integrated Studies or BSc Science program, all courses from the approved areas of study will be designated as the major courses (see FHB III: 6.10).

F. The major average will be calculated by taking the sum of the grades of the major courses divided by the total number of major credits. For combined majors, the major average will be calculated separately for each major; for Integrated Studies and BSc Science students, the core courses in the areas of study will be used in the calculation of the major average.  For BA General Humanities and BA Social Sciences students an overall average of all courses is calculated; there is no major average.

G. Requests to designate specified courses required by a major program but not given by the major Department should be outlined and submitted to the Undergraduate Program Committee for approval.

Senate 257, 266, 280, 393, 436, 460, 615

11.2.7

Students in a major or combined major program who do not attain a grade average of 60, taken over all major courses, may apply for permission to transfer to a BA General Humanities or BA Social Sciences program.

Senate 615

11.3 Course Levels (see FHB III: 5.2.1)

11.3.1

A student will normally be required to begin a University career with five credits at the 1(alpha)00 - 1(alpha)99 level before proceeding to courses at higher levels.

11.3.2

A student will normally be required to pass a minimum of three credits numbered 2(alpha)00 - 2(alpha)99 in the first 10 successfully completed credits before proceeding to further courses at higher levels.

Senate 280

11.3.3

A student will normally be expected to pass a minimum of three credits numbered 2(alpha)90 - 3(alpha)99 in the first 15 successfully completed credits (see FHB III: 6.8 and 6.9).

Senate 271

11.3.4

A student will normally be required to pass a minimum of three credits numbered 3(alpha)90 - 4(alpha)99 to complete the requirements for an Honours Degree (see FHB III: 6.8 and 6.9).

Senate 140, 271

11.3.5

A student will normally be required to pass at least 1.5 to 3.0 credits numbered 3(alpha)90-4(alpha)99, as specified by individual department and program requirements, to complete the requirements for a BA with Major, a BSc with Major, a BPhEd with Major, a BRLS with Major, a BSM with Major, a BKin or a BBA degree (see FHB III: 6.8 and 6.9).

Senate 450, 457

11.4 Requirements for Degrees/Certificates (See also FHB III: 6.7 - 6.11)

11.4.1 Requirements for a Degree

Except in the BA General Humanities or BA Social Sciences, a Pass Degree is awarded on the successful completion of an approved program with a 60 percent average in the courses designated by the Department/Centre as major credits and a cumulative grade average of 60 percent over 15 credits. A BA with Major, a BSc with Major, a BPhEd with Major, a BRLS with Major, a BSM with Major, a BKin or a BBA degree is awarded on the successful completion of an approved program with a minimum 60 percent major average and a cumulative grade average of 60 percent over 20 credits. An Honours Degree is awarded on the successful completion of an approved program of 20 credit with First-class or Second-class standing.

Senate 449, 450, 457, 460, 615

11.5 Repeating Courses

11.5.1 Repeating a Course for which a Passing Grade has been Awarded

Students may repeat a course in which they have received a passing grade. With the approval of the Registrar's Office and under the following conditions, the grade awarded for a repeated course will supersede the grade from the first attempt at the course, regardless of whether it is higher or lower. Both grades will remain on the student's transcript but the second grade, whether higher or lower, will be used in the computation of the student's average. A student will be permitted to repeat passed courses constituting no more than three credits, but no course may be repeated more than once.

However, without prior permission of the Dean, 1(alpha)00 to 1(alpha)99 courses, or other courses listed as prerequisites, may not be repeated if credit has been received for higher level courses in the same subject.

Senate 413

11.5.2 Repeating a Failed Course

A student may repeat a failed course, but no course may be repeated more than once. Both grades will remain on the student's transcript but the second grade will be used in the computation of the student's average.

Senate 288, 344, 413

11.5.3

The student's transcript will include all grades for all courses attempted, but the replaced grades will not be used in the computation of the cumulative grade average.

11.5.4

In order for a student to graduate, the 15 or 20 credits which are used in the computation of the cumulative grade average must satisfy University and program course requirements.

Senate 615

11.6 Honours Program

11.6.1 Honours Standing

Honours standing will be determined by the following criteria:

First-Class Honours: A minimum grade average of 80 percent in all major courses, and a minimum 70 percent grade average in the remaining courses.

Second-Class Honours: A minimum grade average of 70 percent in all major courses, and a minimum 60 percent grade average in the remaining courses.

11.6.2 Entry Into Honours Programs

After passing 15 credits with Second-class Honours standing or better, a student may be permitted to complete the requirements for an Honours degree.

11.6.3 Failure to Maintain Honours Standing

An Honours student who fails to maintain Honours standing after the successful completion of 15 or 20 credits shall be graduated in a Pass Degree or a BA with Major, a BSc with Major, a BPhEd with Major, a BRLS with Major, a BSM with Major, a BKin or a BBA degree, provided that the requirements for the degree have been met.

Senate 457, 615

11.6.4 Entry of Graduates from a Pass Program into an Honours Program

Graduates of a Pass Program may be accepted upon request into an Honours Program provided they:

i) attained honours standing at graduation; and

ii) satisfied the necessary Department/Centre prerequisites.

Senate 393, 615

11.6.5 Entry Into a Program of Study leading to an Honours Degree

Students who have been awarded a 3-year degree or a 4-year degree with major may apply to the Department for entry into a program of study leading to an honours degree. This program will be established by the Department with the Dean's approval. Once the student has fulfilled the program requirements, the student may apply to Senate to have the first degree rescinded and to be awarded the honours degree.

Senate 491

11.7 Notification of Intention to Graduate

A student who wishes to graduate at Spring Convocation must notify the Registrar, in writing, before February 1; a student who wishes to graduate at Fall Convocation must notify the Registrar, in writing, before July 1.

Senate 407, 525

11.8 Standing for Graduation

Four classes of Bachelor's degrees are awarded:

11.8.1 First-Class Honours Degree

This is granted to students who have 20 credits and have attained First-Class Honours standing (see FHB III: 11.6.1). To receive a First-Class Honours degree a transfer student must have completed a minimum of five credits at Brock, including all the departmental Honours requirements for Fourth Year, and have maintained a cumulative overall average of 75 percent or better, in addition to attaining a cumulative major average of 80 percent or better (see FHB III: 11.2.6.B).

Senate 257

11.8.2 Second-Class Honours Degree

This is granted to students who have 20 credits and have attained Second-Class Honours standing (see FHB III:11.6.1). To receive a Second-Class Honours degree a transfer student must have completed a minimum of five credits at Brock, including all departmental Honours requirements for Fourth Year, and have maintained a cumulative overall average of 65 percent or better, in addition to attaining a cumulative major average of 70 percent or better (see FHB III: 11.2.6.B).

Senate 257

11.8.3 Degree with Distinction

A Degree with Distinction is granted to students who have completed a non-honours degree of 15 or 20 credits with a minimum overall average of 80 percent. Transfer students must, in addition, have achieved an overall cumulative average of 80 percent or better on all the courses they have taken at Brock.

Senate 257, 390, 442, 450

11.8.4 Pass Degree

This is granted to a student who has 15 credits with a cumulative grade average of 60 or more (see FHB III: 11.4).

11.8.5

BA with Major, a BSc with Major, a BPhEd with Major, a BRLS with Major, a BSM with Major, a BKin or a BBA Degree.

Except in the BA General Humanities and BA Social Sciences, this is granted to a student who has 20 credits with a 60 percent major average and a cumulative grade average of 60 or more (see FHB III: 11.4).

Senate 449, 450, 457, 615

11.8.6

Students may not modify a degree standing after it has been awarded by taking additional courses to upgrade their standing, nor, once a degree is conferred, may the final record of courses comprising that degree be changed in any manner. This does not preclude a student who has completed a 15-credit degree from applying to pursue a 20-credit degree.

Senate 444, 450, 483, 544

11.9 Withholding of Degree or Grades

11.9.1

All grades are unofficial until they have been approved by Senate and released by the Office of the Registrar (see FHB III: 9.2.6).

11.9.2

No student owing the University fees or fines will receive a degree or a statement of final grades, or have any such statements communicated to parties outside the University, until such time as the debts have been cleared to the satisfaction of the University.

11.10 Records, Transcripts and Diplomas

11.10.1

The up-to-date records of all students who are taking courses for academic credit shall be held by the Office of the Registrar.

11.10.2

A. The Office of the Registrar shall obtain from entering freshmen and transfer students, their full name (including all given names) and an indication of the given name commonly used.

B. The Office of the Registrar, and other bodies in the University, shall use in all records and publications one of the following: the student's full name, or the student's given name with initials, or the student's initials only; provided that in any single document the usage is consistent.

11.10.3

Class lists for examinations shall be circulated by the Office of the Registrar to each Department.

11.10.4

The Office of the Registrar shall report to students the final alphabetical and numerical grades assigned for each course taken during the current year as soon as possible after the conclusion of the second term.

11.10.5

The Office of the Registrar shall make available to all students, upon payment of the appropriate service charges, a copy of their official transcript, including alphabetical and numerical grades.

11.10.6

A. All official transcripts, as distinct from statements of standing, shall be issued by the Office of the Registrar.

B. Official transcripts shall give descriptive course titles as well as course numbers.

11.10.7

The diplomas of students who attain first-class honours shall record their First-Class Honours standing as First-Class Honours in....". The diplomas of all other honours graduates shall record "With honours in....".

Senate 393

11.10.8

The title of the "Major" shall be indicated on all diplomas. Diplomas shall be designed to indicate the degree name on the first line, the discipline of the major on the second line, and the standing (i.e., first-class or distinction) on the third line (if appropriate). The notation (3 Year) will appear on three-year pass degrees.

Senate 450, 481

11.10.9

The diplomas of students who obtain a Degree with Distinction shall record "with distinction".

Senate 128, 450

11.11 Filing of Bachelor's Thesis

11.11.1

After approval of a Bachelor's thesis, the examiners may recommend that this be placed in the Library. In such a case, the candidate shall present the original and one copy of the approved thesis to the Chair of the Department for binding at the Department's expense (on request, the candidate may have his own copy of the thesis bound at his own expense). These copies must be corrected of any errors noted by the examiners and must be identical in content, each containing all charts, maps, figures, tables and appendices, as finally approved. After binding, the Library will retain the original, and the copy will be retained in the files of the Department.

Senate 52

11.11.2

In cases where the thesis is not placed in the Library, at least one copy, which need not be bound, shall be retained in the files of the Department.

Senate 52

11.11.3

Unless there are specific instructions to the contrary, the University Library will allow a Bachelor's thesis in its keeping to be consulted or borrowed, or to be issued in whole or in part in photostatted or microfilmed form.

Senate 52

12. Appeals

12.1 Preamble

This section outlines Brock's academic appeals procedures. Students should note that appeals to the Student Appeals Board is a final recourse in dealing with academic appeals. Students must ensure that they follow the prescribed process and meet with required individuals prior to submitting an appeal to the Student Appeals Board. Students who submit an appeal to the Student Appeals Board without following the prescribed procedure will have the appeal returned without decision.

12.2 Types of Appeals

12.2.1 Appeal of Grades

i) Students who have a question regarding the final grade in a course must first discuss the matter with the course instructor. In the event of an unresolved disagreement, the student must refer the matter to the Chair/Director of the Department/Program. If not satisfied, the student must then refer the matter to the Dean of the Faculty. If the student is not satisfied with the decision of the Dean, the student may then appeal to the Student Appeals Board.

ii) Appeals of final grades, including the assignment of a failing grade for non-attendance in a course, must be made within 180 days of the official release of grades by the Office of the Registrar. Failure in itself is not a valid reason for appeal. If the absence of the instructor, or other factors make an appeal within 180 days impossible, the intention to appeal should be indicated to the Chair/Director of the Department within 180 days of official release of grades by the Office of the Registrar.

iii) In circumstances which prevent the student from presenting information in a timely fashion, a student must present documentation of mitigating evidence, to the Registrar. Upon validation of the documentation, the appeal will be processed.

Senate 465. 501

12.2.2 Appeals Related to Academic Requirements/Decisions

i) A request for an exemption to a departmental degree requirement must be directed to the Chair/Director of the student's major Department/Program. (Combined majors shall appeal to the Department/Program directly affected by the request for an exemption.) If not satisfied with the outcome of the request, the student will then refer the matter to the Dean of the Faculty. If the student is not satisfied with the decision of the Dean, the student may then appeal to the Student Appeals Board.

ii) A request for an exemption to a University or Faculty degree requirement must be directed to the Dean of the student's Faculty. If the student is not satisfied with the decision of the Dean, the student may then appeal to the Student Appeals Board.

12.2.3 Requests for Retroactive Registration and Backdated Withdrawal

i) Within 12 weeks of the last day of classes, a backdated withdrawal will be considered upon the receipt of a request which is supported by documentation verifying the medical reasons or compassionate grounds which prevented the student from withdrawing by the last day to do so. Requests submitted without supporting documentation will not be considered.

ii) Prior to the last day of lectures, a request for retroactive registration will be considered upon the receipt of supporting documentation which outline the reason(s) why formal registration did not occur. This documentation must be accompanied by a Course Change Form signed and dated by the course instructor verifying that the student has been in continuous attendance and has completed all necessary work.

iii) Requests under i) and ii) are considered and a decision rendered by the Registrar. There is no charge for these requests.

iv) Students wishing to appeal the decision of the Registrar must refer the matter to the appropriate academic Dean. If the student is not satisfied with the decision of the Dean, the student may then appeal to the Student Appeals Board. Appeals to the Student Appeals Board must be typed, must provide any additional documentation not submitted to the Dean and must be accompanied by a $50.00 appeal fee. The fee will be refunded only if the appeal is successful.

v) When appropriate, the grade NW (Not Withdrawn) may be assigned by the Student Appeals Board or the Dean of the student's Faculty within the specified appeal period and when supporting documentation is supplied by the student.

Senate 470

12.2.4 Appeals of Charges of Academic Misconduct

Following a Dean's decision on the charge of Academic Misconduct, all appeals relating to the charge of Academic Misconduct, penalties assigned or notations on transcripts will be heard by the Student Appeals Board.

12.3 Medical Appeals

The University endeavours to accommodate students whose studies become interrupted, or who may be unable to complete academic work, due to an incapacitating medical condition. In these situations, the student must complete the Brock University Student Medical Certificate or Brock University Student Health Services Medical Certificate and include any relevant medical documentation to support his/her request for academic accommodation based on medical grounds. The University may, at its discretion, request more detailed documentation in certain cases.

Senate 457, 555

12.4 Appeals Procedures

12.4.1 Method of Appeal to the Student Appeals Board

i) All appeals directed to the Student Appeals Board shall be submitted in type-written form and must be accompanied by the appeal fee. Electronic requests will not be accepted. Submissions not received in this form will be returned to the student without decision.

ii) Appeals must clearly state the arguments and expectations of the student. The responsibility is on the student to demonstrate the validity of the appeal and to provide full and appropriate supporting documentation. Dissatisfaction with, or ignorance or neglect of University policy or published deadlines shall not constitute sufficient grounds for appeal.

iii) Appeals of a charge of academic misconduct shall be submitted within 30 days of the date of the letter informing the student of the decision of the Dean.

iv) Appeals of academic decisions must be made within 30 days of the date of the letter informing the student of the academic decision or within 30 days of the mailing date of the Statement of Standing which informs the student of the academic decision and/or final grade.

v) All appeals shall be submitted, in person, by the appellant (person requesting the appeal), to the Administrative Co-ordinator, Student Appeals Board.

vi) The Student Appeals Board considers only written submissions and documentation.

vii) Appeals based on emotional or medical problems must be supported by a Student Medical Certificate, Brock University or Brock University Student Health Services Medical Certificate indicating specifically the student's inability to fulfill the requirements being appealed.

viii) Submissions must include any additional documentation not originally provided or available at any previous meeting.

ix) An appeal may be disqualified if received outside the 30 day period.

x) A student may abandon an appeal at any time during the appeal process.

Senate 558

12.4.2 Hearings at the Student Appeals Boards

i) Meetings of the Student Appeals Board are held in camera, meaning they are not open to the public.

ii) In accordance with the rules of natural justice, students appealing to the Student Appeals Board have a right to a fair hearing. This includes the right to be notified of date at which the student's appeal will be considered, the right to attend and present verbal arguments and the right to question the Dean (or the person designated by the Dean) or the Registrar.

iii)Students must inform the Administrative Co-ordinator, Student Appeals Board of their intention to attend the meeting.

iv) Students are entitled to bring one faculty, staff or student member of Brock University while attending the meeting of the Student Appeals Board. Please refer to the Academic Integrity Policy for additional information and procedures.

v) Where a member of the University community has a close personal relationship, defined as any relationship, arising from being a member of immediate or extended family (parent, guardian, partner, sibiling, aunt, uncle, cousin, or in-law) with a student; that person shall not participate in or contribute to that student's disciplinary proceeding.

vi) Where a member of the University community and the student are engaged in activities (academic work, research projects, teaching programs, employment situations, etc.) where the member of the University community is a Faculty supervisor, manager, or in a position of authority; that person shall not participate in or contribute to that student's disciplinary proceeding.

vii) In situations where the relationship of a member of the University community and a student may pose a real, apparent, or potential conflict of interest; both parties must formally disclose (i.e., in writing) the conflict of interest, upon discovery, to the Administrative Co-ordinator, Student Appeals Board prior to the hearing. The Chair, Student Appeals Board shall inform the parties of the guidelines contained within this policy and shall direct how the conflict of interest shall be resolved. Please refer to the University's Conflict of Interest Policy for further definition, explanation and procedural guidelines.

viii) If a student has asked to attend the meeting of the Student Appeals Board, the Dean (or the person designated by the Dean) whose decision is being appealed will be invited to attend that meeting of the Student Appeals Board.

ix) The Student Appeals Board may request the attendance of appropriate individuals to appear before the Board to provide information pertinent to the appeal.

x) Where the appeal is against an assigned final grade, the faculty member named in the appeal will be invited to attend the meeting of the Student Appeals Board.

xi) In instances where a faculty member, Department Chair or Program Director is named in an appeal, the student's submission will be available to the individual named.

xii) At the request of the student, the written response of the faculty member, Department Chair, Program Director or Dean to an appeal will be made available to the student.

xiii) The student and the Dean, and where applicable the Chair/Director and faculty member, will be informed, in writing, of the decision of the Student Appeals Board.

xiv) The decision of the Board is final.

Senate 413, 571

13. Part-time Studies

13.1 Regulations

13.1.1 Definitions of Full-time, Part-time Students

A full-time student is defined as one taking three or more credits during regular academic term. A part-time student is defined as one taking fewer than three credits during regular term. All students are subject to the same academic regulations.

Senate 126, 140, 396, 418

13.2 Equivalence

A. Courses given in the Spring and Summer Sessions shall be equivalent in content to their counterparts in the normal Fall/Winter Session and shall not be less than sixty hours, or its equivalent in laboratories, and all students (part-time or full-time) in a given course shall sit the same or equivalent examinations. If different examinations are given, the Department shall submit two equivalent examinations.

Senate 84, 105, 228, 418

B. To this end, the structure of a course in Spring and Summer sessions (e.g., the proportion of seminars/laboratories to lectures), the instructor engaged for it, and the examination proposed for it, must be approved in advance by the Department concerned.

Senate 84, 211, 418

14. Graduate Studies Academic Regulations

14.1 Establishment and Review of Graduate Programs

14.1.1 Statement of Principles

A. The establishment and continuation of graduate programs should add to the academic quality of the undergraduate programs of the University and contribute to the research endeavours. Graduate programs must be consistent with the University's planning documents and resources may be re-allocated to Graduate Studies in the context of the approved University planning documents.

B. Senate supports the principle of co-operation with other universities in graduate work at both the PhD and Master's level.

Senate 197, 469, 599

14.2 Graduate Student Rights and Responsibilities Policy

Brock University values the unique role of Graduate Students to Brock University's mission of teaching, service and research and encourages dialogue among graduate students, faculty, staff and administrators. The Policy on Graduate Student Rights and Responsibilities complements other University policies and documents in order to promote collegial, respectful and academically beneficial interactions among these groups.

Senate 621

14.3 The Calendar Year

The Graduate Calendar Year consists of three sixteen week graduate terms: Spring/Summer, Fall and Winter.

Registration and other important dates will be published annually in the Graduate Calendar and reported to Senate.

Graduate courses will be scheduled through the University Scheduling Office  The duration of scheduled graduate courses may vary within the sixteen week term.  All major research paper and thesis courses will be scheduled in sixteen week durations.

Reading Week shall commence on the sixth Sunday after the beginning of classes for the Winter Term, and shall continue for seven days until the seventh Sunday. Graduate courses will not normally be held during Reading Week.

Convocation dates and University examination periods are set by the Registrar's Office.

Senate 545, 588, 597

14.4 Graduate Calendar

The Graduate Calendar will be prepared annually by the Faculty of Graduate Studies in electronic format and posted on the Brock University website. Necessary changes and udpates will be published electronically on a continuous basis.

14.4.1 Graduate Program Calendar Entries

The Senate Graduate Studies Committee shall review and approve, on a yearly basis, proposed Graduate Program Calendar entries and shall recommend any changes in graduate degree requirements for approval to Senate.

14.4.2 Course Approval

All degree-credit courses must be approved for inclusion in the course bank by the Senate Graduate Studies Committee prior to being offered. Any course which has not been approved for inclusion or has been deleted may not be offered. Those courses approved for inclusion will be published in the Calendar.

Senate 529, 565

14.4.3 Changes in Designation

Changes to the number, title or description or any approved course must be:

a) reported to the Senate Graduate Studies Committee if the proposed change does not significantly alter either the focus or nature of the course, or,

b) approved by the Senate Graduate Studies Committee if the proposed change significantly alters either the focus or nature of the course.

Senate 565

14.4.4 Course Deletions

A. Deletions from the course bank must be approved by the Senate Graduate Studies Committee.

B. Any course not offered over a period of five consecutive years, and not proposed for offering during the sixth year, should be deleted from the course bank by the Senate Graduate Studies Committee. Any exceptions must be justified by the Graduate Program concerned and approved by the Senate Graduate Studies Committee.

C. Any Graduate Program course number deleted from the course bank cannot be used again until five years have elapsed since the number was deleted.

Senate 565

14.4.5 Availability of Graduate Courses

Following registration by students within a specific graduate program, with permission of the instructor(s), and where space allows, students from other graduate programs may register in that specific program's graduate courses.

14.4.6 Graduate Faculty

As part of their yearly Calendar entry graduate programs will identify the program's core and participating faculty members.

Senate 571

14.4.7  Graduate Program Director

Each graduate program shall have a Graduate Program Director who has primary responsibility for overseeing the administration of his/her graduate program.  This responsibility includes chairing the Graduate Program Committee, coordinating the administration of the graduate program, liaising between the Faculty of Graduate Studies and the graduate program, and overseeing the general progress of graduate students through their program.

Senate 590

14.4.8  Graduate Program Committee

Each graduate program must strike a Graduate Program Committee from its core faculty members that at minimum will oversee program admissions, assess student progress, and update program procedures and the Program Handbook.  The Graduate Program Director will be a member ex officio.

Senate 590

14.4.9 Graduate Program Handbook

It is the responsibility of each graduate program to maintain an up-to-date electronic Graduate Program Handbook for its students and faculty members that outlines program specific policies and procedures (e.g. how/when progress is evaluated, timelines to guide the completion of the degree, supervisor information).  The Gradudate Program Handbook should utilize electronic links to refer to relevant information and policies that are outlined in the Graduate Calendar and/or Faculty Handbook.  The Graduate program Handbook shall be reviewed and updated by the Graduate Program Committee and the Faculty of Graduate Studies by June 30th of each calendar year to ensure that the revised Program Handbook is available to students and faculty by August 31 of that year.

Senate 590, 609

14.4.10 Graduate Course Instructors

Graduate courses will be taught by a member of the graduate program's core and participating faculty member list as published in the yearly Graduate Calendar. Currently registered Brock graduate students may not serve as instructors for any Brock graduate course.

Senate 571

14.5 Graduate Degrees

14.5.1 Doctoral Degrees

Applied Health Sciences, Biological Sciences, Biotechnology, Chemistry, Interdisciplinary Humanities, Educational Studies, Physics, Psychology

Senate 512, 557. 571, 588

14.5.2 Master's Degrees

Master of Accountancy, Master of Applied Disability Studies, Master of Business Administration, Master of Business Economics, Master of Education, Master of Arts in: Applied Disability Studies, Applied Health Sciences, Applied Linguistics, Canadian-American Studies, Child and Youth Studies, Classics, Critical Sociology, English, Geography, History, Philosophy, Political Science, Popular Culture, Psychology, Social Justice and Equity Studies, Studies in Comparative Literatures and Arts; Master of Science in: Applied Health Sciences, Biological Sciences, Biotechnology, Chemistry, Computer Science, Earth Sciences Management, Mathematics and Statistics, Physics, Master of Sustainability.

Senate 42, 51, 56, 365, 512, 557, 571, 605, 621

14.5.3 Graduate Diplomas

Applied Disability Studies

Senate 512, 557

14.6 Admissions

14.6.1 Administration of Admissions Policy

A. The Dean of Graduate Studies is responsible for the administration of the graduate admissions policy of Senate.

B. Application and admissions procedures are outlined by the Faculty of Graduate Studies.

C. Each graduate program will make recommendations for the acceptance of applicants to the Faculty of Graduate Studies. The official letter of acceptance will be issued by the Dean of Graduate Studies or his/her designate. The University may nullify an offer of admission and revoke registration if it finds that an applicant has in the application process provided false or incomplete information.

14.6.2 Standards for Admission

A. The University regulations for admission specify minimum requirements only. Possession of the minimum admission requirements is not a guarantee of admission. Individual graduate program admission requirements may exceed the minimum University admission requirements. The University reserves the right to refuse admission to any candidate.

B. Applicants will not be admissible to a graduate degree program at Brock University if they have previously obtained a similar or identical degree.

14.6.3 Categories of Admission

A. Regular Admission

Admission to Master's Programs (degree and diploma/certificate)

To be considered for admission to a Master's program, a student will normally hold a four year Bachelor's degree, or its equivalent, from an accredited university with a minimum average of 75% (mid-B) over the last two years of full-time undergraduate study.  Individual graduate programs may set higher or additional admission requirements.

Senate 584, 619

Admission to Doctoral Programs

To be admitted to a Doctoral program, a student will normally hold an appropriate Master's degree, or its equivalent, with a minimum overall Master's grade average of 80% (low-A) from an accredited university. Alternatively, students with an honours undergraduate degree already registered in a Brock University Master's program, may be approved to transfer to Doctoral studies by no later than the end of term six of their Master's program. Such students should have attained an 80% average in their Master's courses and significant research progress as determined by their supervisory committee and graduate program.  In exceptional circumstances, a student may be admitted directly to Doctoral studies with a four-year honours Bachelor's degree, or the equivalent; his or her academic standing and research potential must be demonstrably commensurate with readiness for doctoral study.

Senate 579

B. Limited Admission

Upon recommendation from a Graduate Program Committee, the Dean of Graduate Studies may offer admission to applicants who do not meet the minimum University admission requirements.

Non-degree Student

A non-degree student is a student who is not proceeding toward a Brock University graduate degree. Non-degree students are identified as:

i. Qualifying or Upgrading Graduate Students - those who are taking graduate courses (undergraduate and/or graduate) to qualify for graduate study.

ii. Letter of Permission Graduate Students - are authorized by their home universities to take graduate courses at Brock.

iii. Ontario Visiting Graduate Students - are authorized by their home universities to take graduate courses at Brock.

iv. Students seeking professional development or pursuing personal interest - are authorized by a Brock graduate program to take graduate courses at Brock.

Normally, non-degree students will be allowed to register in a maximum of one full course equivalent.  If a non-degree student is later admitted to a Brock graduate program, it is the responsibility of that Graduate Program Committee to determine if graduate credit(s) completed as a non-degree student can be used to fulfill graduate degree requirements.

Senate 609

C. Conditional Admission

Applicants may be admitted to a graduate program contingent upon the successful completion of specified additional academic requirements.

D.  Exceptional Admission

The Dean of Graduate Studies may approve admission for an applicant who does not meet minimum admission requirements if requested by the graduate program and if he/she is satisfied that the program's rationale for admission is sound and the applicant has a reasonable chance of success.  Exceptional circumstances may include the lack of a four-year honours Bachelor's degree or equivalent or lower than minimum admission averages.  Normally conditions related to early performance in the program are attached to exceptional admissions.  Applicants with four-year Applied Degrees from Colleges of Applied Arts & Technology, accredited by AUCC, will be considered on a case-by-case basis.

Senate 578

14.6.4 Transfer Students

A. Students admitted to a graduate program may be granted transfer credit, at the time of admission, to a maximum of one-third of graduate degree course requirements, for graduate courses completed at another university that are approved by the graduate program (For the MBA the maximum number of transfer credits is 5.0). Only graduate courses completed with a grade of B+ or higher, within the last five years, will be considered for transfer. Credit will not be granted for courses that have been credited toward another degree or diploma at Brock or another university. Candidates must submit official transcripts, course descriptions, and other supporting documentation before consideration will be given to granting transfer credit.

B. Students admitted as transfer students must be in good standing with their previous institution and eligible to enrol at that institution at the time of admission to Brock.

14.6.5 Advanced Standing

The MBA program will automatically assess a student's transcript for completed undergraduate credits that would be considered to be equivalent to those normally completed in the first year of the MBA. Subject to the student's performance in the undergraduate courses, up to a maximum of five credits may be granted as advanced standing credits.

14.6.6 Reinstatement of Students who Voluntarily Withdrew or were Required to Withdraw

A. Students who were previously accepted to and registered in a graduate program at Brock University, but voluntarily withdrew or were required to withdraw, may apply for reinstatement to their graduate program by completing the Request for Reinstatement Form. The graduate program and the Faculty of Graduate Studies will consider the request for reinstatement and determine if the student is eligible for reinstatement and outline the degree requirements that must be met following reinstatement.

B. Graduate programs and/or the Faculty of Graduate Studies are under no obligation to re-instate students who voluntarily withdrew or were required to withdraw.

Senate 197, 217, 377, 450, 457, 469, 548

14.6.7 English Language Proficiency

A. English is the language of instruction for graduate programs at Brock University. Therefore, strong English language ability is necessary for full participation in academic life at the University. Successful graduate work requires solid proficiency in all four English language skills: speaking, listening, reading and writing.

B. Master's applicants who have not completed three or more years of post-secondary study and doctoral applicants who have not completed two or more years of post-secondary study at a Canadian institution or at an institution at which English was the primary language of instruction will be required to provide certification of English language proficiency through one of the accepted program/examinations listed below:

i) Successful completion of Level 5 of the Brock Intensive English Language program; or

ii) A minimum TOEFL PBT (Paper based) score of 550 plus 4.0 minimum for the TWE (Test of Written English), or TOEFL iBT (Internet based) minimum overall score of 80, with no sub-test score under 19; or
                                                                                                                              Senate 595

iii) A minimum score of 6.5 on the International English Language Testing System (IELTS), with no section under 5.5; or

iv) A minimum overall score range of 520-545 (Range 2), with a minimum writing score range of 225-235 on the Brock University International Test of English Language Proficiency (ITELP); or

v) Achievement of an overall Band Score of 60, with 60 in writing, and no other under 50 on the Canadian Academic English Language Assessment (CAEL); or

vi) An average of at least 4.5 with no band score lower than 4.0 on the Can Test (Canadian Test of English for Scholars and Trainees).

vii) A minimum overall score of 60 and a minimum score of 60 in each individual component on the Pearson Test of English Academic (PTE-A).

Senate 617

C. Students admitted on the basis of an English Language Proficiency test score are required to take the Brock University ITELP test upon arrival at the University as a condition of admission. The test results are sent by the Faculty of Graduate Studies to the student, the graduate supervisor and the Graduate Program Director.  The intent of this ELP assessment on arrival is to provide the student and the graduate program with an early indication of the graduate student's English language capability as he/she enters the graduate program.  It is up to the program and the student to review the results and to determine and implement any required or suggested student-specific ELP remediation or support.

Senate 578

D. International Graduate Cohort Programs

Students applying to International Graduate Cohort programs will adhere to the same English Language Proficiency requirements as those students applying to the domestic graduate programs. It is strongly recommended that International Graduate Cohort programs, in the pre-screening of potential applicants for the graduate cohort programs, utilize the Brock University ITELP English Proficiency Test and a personal interview to assess the potential student's English Language Proficiency.

All International Graduate Cohort programs must include as part of their program requirements an English Language bridging program and ongoing English language support services. These will be described in the program's graduate calendar entry.

E. Graduate programs may require English Proficiency scores that are higher than the University minimums for admission to specific graduate programs.

Senate 517, 550

14.7 Registration and Student Status

14.7.1 Full-Time Graduate Students

Full-time graduate students are defined as students whose main focus is graduate study for the purpose of obtaining a graduate degree. Graduate study differs from the undergraduate study in that it is, for most students, an activity that is highly concentrated, demanding and all-consuming. Full-time graduate students are defined as follows:

a) they must be pursuing their studies as a full-time occupation and identify themselves as full-time graduate students in all documentation;

b) they must be considered by the University to be in full-time study;

c) they must maintain regular contact with their Graduate Program Director and Supervisor;

d) they must be geographically available and visit the campus regularly. Without forfeiting full-time status, a graduate student while under supervision, may be absent from the university (e.g., visiting libraries, doing field work, attending a graduate course at another institution) provided that, if any such absence exceeds four weeks in any one term, written approval of the student's absence by the Graduate Program Director is forwarded to the Faculty of Graduate Studies for approval.

e) they are expected to limit their paid employment to an average of no more than ten hours per week in a given term (per OCGS requirement, 1994, 2000, 2005). This ten hours per week rule includes all paid employment including Graduate Teaching Assistantships and Research Assistantships. All exceptions to the ten hour rule with respect to on-campus employment requires the approval of the Dean of Graduate Studies in consultation with the graduate supervisor and the Graduate Program Director.

14.7.2 Part-Time Graduate Students

Any graduate student who does not meet the requirements of a full-time graduate student as defined above is considered to be a part-time student. There is no restriction with respect to time spent in paid employment for part-time students. Part-time students may register in a maximum of 1.0 credit per term, excluding thesis registration.

Senate 388, 571

14.7.3  Changes in Status

Students are admitted to the University either as full-time or part-time students and this status can only be changed for valid reasons with the permission of the Graduate Program Director and the Faculty of Graduate Studies.

14.7.4 Minimum Registration Requirements

A Master's Degree will usually require one year (12 months) of full-time registration. Part-time candidates may be considered in certain programs and in such cases at least two years of part-time registration will be required. A Doctoral degree requires three years (36 months) of full-time registration. Part-time candidates may be considered in certain programs and in such cases at least five years of part-time registration will be required.

Senate 197, 369

14.7.5 Program Lengths

Each graduate degree program has a defined time to completion which is the number of graduate terms normally required to complete the program. Graduate funding periods are typically tied to the program's defined time to completion.

14.7.6 Applicable Calendar

Students who have maintained enrolment in each calendar year (May to April) may complete the degree program using the "Academic Regulations" section of the Calendar published in the year in which that program was entered, or any subsequent calendar published while enrolled. However, students who interrupt their studies for one or more years by not enrolling become subject to the Calendar regulations in effect at the time of their re-registration.

Senate 565

14.7.7 Course Substitutions

A Graduate Program Director may approve degree requirement course substitutions up to a maximum of 25% of program requirements (excluding the thesis or major research paper).  Such course substitutions must be reported to the Faculty of Graduate Studies (preferably at the time of course registration).

14.7.8 Course Outlines

Course oulines are required for all graduate courses (excluding Major Research Papers and Theses).  At a minimum, course outlines will include the proposed manner in which evaluation will be carried out, expectations for completing the course, and rules/regulations that apply to the course.  Copies of course outlines will be filed with Graduate Program Directors.

Senate 590, 595

14.7.9 Degree Completion Time Limits

For master's degrees, full-time students must complete all degree requirements within three years from the date of first registration. part-time MA, MEd, MSc, MBE and MADS students must complete all degree requirements within five years from the date of first registration. Part-time MBA students must complete all degree requirements within six years from the date of first registration.

For doctoral degrees, full-time students must complete the thesis and course requirements within six years from the date of first registration. Part-time students must complete all degree requirements within eight years from the date of first registration. If a doctoral candidate is approved to transfer to the doctoral program from an incomplete master's program, the candidate's time limit will be calculated from the date of first registration in the master's program.

Where a student is permitted to change status from full-time to part-time or vice versa, the fraction of time remaining under the previous status will apply to the new status.

14.7.10 Continuous Registration in Graduate Programs

i) Graduate students must maintain continuous registration in each successive term from the time of initial admission until degree requirements are complete. Students must be registered to the end of the term in which they complete the degree requirements, including the term during which the thesis defence is scheduled. Students are responsible for ensuring that they register at the appropriate time for each term, as indicated in the graduate calendar.

ii) Students who fail to register for any term, and who have not been granted inactive status or a leave of absence, are considered to have withdrawn from their program of study. The student will be required to apply for reinstatement into the program.

iii) Inactive Status

If, for some acceptable reason, a student is unable to take courses in a specific term, inactive status may be approved by the Graduate Program Director. During an inactive term, the student pays the inactive fee and retains library privileges. Inactive terms do not extend the final completion date by which degree requirements must be completed. Normally, inactive terms may not be consecutive and no more than two inactive terms may be taken during any graduate degree program.

Senate 362, 365, 388, 421, 469, 533

iv) Leaves of Absence

A leave of absence from a graduate program will be granted only in exceptional circumstances which will include parental and maternity leave, medical leave, compassionate leave, or work leave which requires the student to leave the geographic area. Cases will be considered on an individual basis and must have the approval of the supervisor (if applicable) and the Graduate Program Director before they are submitted to the Faculty of Graduate Studies for approval. A graduate student granted a leave of absence will not be registered and will not be required to pay fees for the duration of the leave. Students on leave will not be eligible to receive university fellowship support or other financial support from the University. In the case of funding by an external agency, the regulations of the granting agency will apply. The length of time for completion of the degree will be extended by the duration of the leave. While on leave students will not normally be entitled to use University facilities and resources, or receive supervision. Leaves of absence are for a minimum of two consecutive terms and a maximum of three consecutive terms. Normally, a student will not be granted more than one leave of absence during a graduate degree program. A leave of absence cannot be followed by an inactive term.

Senate 421, 469, 533

v) Personal Time Off
Students may take up to two weeks per year (14 Calendar days) in personal time off, plus statutory and non-statutory holidays during which the University is closed. This personal time off must be negotiated between student and supervisor and/or Graduate Program Director. Time off should not compromise the progress of a student’s studies, including the fulfillment of course requirements. Students must ensure that laboratory activities and experimentation are either completed or arrangements made for others to continue ongoing work. Time sensitive deadlines must be taken into consideration. Time off cannot be carried forward from year to year. Time off should be requested as far in advance as possible.

                                                                                                                                     Senate 599

14.7.11 Final Stage Status

Students approved for Final Stage Status by their graduate program must have a complete draft of their Major Research Paper or Thesis, that requires no further research or additional chapters/sections, and must be deemed by their graduate program committee to be able to complete their exit requirement within the subsequent term.  Final Stage Status may only be awarded once and only for one term.

Senate 590, 606

14.7.12 Letters of Permission

A. A student may request a Letter of Permission from the Faculty of Graduate Studies in order to take a course or courses at another university as a visiting student. The student must be in good standing, that is, having successfully completed a minimum of two graduate credits with a minimum overall B average. Brock credit will not be granted to students who Challenge for Credit, on Letter of Permission, at the host institution.

B. The student must indicate the specific course(s) he/she wishes to take and provide the Faculty of Graduate Studies with the course description(s) from the calendar of the host university. Course(s) requested should be relevant to a student's degree program and must be approved by both the student's academic department/program and the Dean of Graduate Studies. Approval shall be at the discretion of the department/program and Dean, who shall base the decision on the applicant's overall academic record, the appropriateness of the particular course to the applicant's program and on any other factors deemed relevant.

C. If a letter of permission is granted to a currently registered student, it will be provisional pending successful completion of the progression requirements for that session.

D. On return to the Faculty of Graduate Studies of the approved application, the Faculty of Graduate Studies will forward a Letter of Permission to the host university. Students should contact the host university to determine any course access limitations imposed on visiting students.

E. Students must formally request that the host university forward an official transcript to Brock. The transcript must be received within eight weeks of the course end date as specified on the application for the Letter of Permission. Failure to provide an official transcript will result in the automatic assignment of a failing (F) grade in each course attempted on the Letter of Permission.

F. Not more than one credit (two half credit courses) may be taken at other universities on a Letter of Permission to fulfill graduation requirements for any graduate program at Brock

G. Courses taken on a Letter of Permission will not be included in the calculation of the graduate student's Brock University average.

H. Credit will be granted only when the course is completed successfully with a minimum grade of "B" or 70% at the host institution. Course credit will be granted equal in value to the course weight assigned by the host institution. Any course attempted under a letter of permission shall be recorded on the Brock University transcript as a Pass/Fail grade. The exact name and title of the course(s) taken, the name of the host institution, and the grade assigned by the host institution, will appear as a notation on the Brock University transcript.

I. If the selected course is dropped after the commencement of classes, notification, in writing, and an official transcript or statement, must be submitted immediately by the student to the Faculty of Graduate Studies at Brock University.

J. Students granted permission to take the final course(s) of their program on a Letter of Permission must ensure that grades, in the form of an official transcript, are received by the Faculty of Graduate Studies by May 15 for those wanting to graduate at Spring Convocation and October 1 for those wanting to graduate at Fall Convocation.

Senate 516

14.7.13 Continuation in a Graduate Program

Graduate students must achieve and maintain minimum satisfactory academic performance to be eligible to continue in a graduate program. Graduate program committees will review the performance of their enrolled graduate students on a regular basis, preferably each term.

At minimum, graduate programs will ensure that there is a formal meeting of each PhD supervisory committee at least once within the academic year (May-April). Each PhD supervisory committee must report annually on the student’s progress and the Graduate Program Director must forward such reports to the Faculty of Graduate Studies. The report will formally document the supervisory committee’s assessment of the progress of the student in the program.

                                                                                                                                Senate 599

Minimum Academic Performance and Academic Probation

Graduate students must maintain a minimum cumulative average of at least a B-(70%) during each term of study. If a graduate student falls below the minimum cumulative average the student will be automatically placed on academic probation for the subsequent term by the Faculty of Graduate Studies. Additionally a graduate program may recommend required program withdrawal. A probationary student must achieve the minimum cumulative average, normally during the probationary term, to be eligible to continue as a graduate student.

In graduate programs with a research exit requirement (thesis, major essay/research paper) satisfactory academic progress during the research phase will be determined through academic progress reviews by the graduate program committee (normally once per term) as outlined in the program's Graduate Handbook. An unsatisfactory academic progress decision, as determined by the Graduate Program Committee, may result in a program's decision to place the student on academic probation for the subsequent term or a request for required program withdrawal.

Required Program Withdrawl

Requests for required program withdrawal that are the result of a student's lack of academic progress/performance must be submitted in writing by the Graduate Program director to the Dean of Graduate Studies. Each request will be reviewed and approved by the Dean of Graduate Studies in consultation with the Graduate Program Director and the Faculty Dean.

If a failing grade is awarded for a major essay/research paper or thesis, the student will be automatically withdrawn from the graduate program by the Faculty of Graduate Studies.

Senate 571

14.7.14 Withdrawals

Required Withdrawal from Course

Graduate students may be required to withdraw from a graduate course(s) due to academic or non-academic misconduct.

Required Withdrawal from Graduate Program

Graduate students may be required to withdraw from a graduate program due to unsatisfactory performance or academic or non-academic misconduct.

Voluntary Withdrawal from Courses

Graduate students may voluntarily withdraw from registered course(s) by informing the Office of Graduate Studies in writing within the defined withdrawal period.

Following the couse drop/change period, the week of withdrawal from a course will be recorded on the student's official transcript. Grades will be recorded on students' transcripts for all courses in which they have officially registered and from which they have not officially withdrawn.

Voluntary Withdrawal from Graduate Program

Graduate students may voluntarily withdraw from a graduate program by consulting with the graduate program and submitting the Notice of Voluntary Withdrawl Form.

Refund of Fees

Graduate students who withdraw may be entitled to a certain refund of tuition fees but, if holding any funding or awards within University control, will have their funding/award value pro-rated bsed on months to the withdrawal date and applied to their student account.

Senate 564

14.8 Examinations

14.8.1 Graduate Course Examinations

Graduate instructors will indicate on the course outline and grading scheme whether formal or informal scheduled examinations are required.

Formal examinations scheduled and administered by the Office of the Registrar must follow the examination regulations outlined in FHB III: 9. For graduate examinations, the responsibilities of the Department Chair, outlined in FHB III: 9, may be assumed by the Graduate Program Director.

Informal examinations administered by the graduate program (i.e., not scheduled by the Office of the Registrar and not take-home examinations) must be supervised by the course instructor or a designated proctor who remains in the examination room at all times.

14.8.2 Examination Scripts

Examination scripts must clearly identify the requirements for completing the examination. The duration in hours and minutes, if relevant, must also be identified. When an instructor transmits grades for a course to the Faculty of Graduate Studies, the examination scripts shall be kept by the instructor for a period of time not less than six months. After that time, they must be shredded.

Students have the right to inspect their examination paper under faculty supervision.

14.8.3 Deferred Examinations

If a student is unable to write a formally scheduled examination, or having begun the exam is unable to complete it for reasons of ill-health, a deferred examination will be granted provided adequate supportive documentation has been submitted. Requests made on the basis of compassionate grounds, religious obligations, or other extenuating circumstances will be judged on a case-by-case basis.

Any medical request for a Deferred Examination must be supported by a completed Brock University Student Medical Certificate (and include any relevant medical documentation) certifying that the student was not capable of attempting the examination at the scheduled date and time.

A student must first contact the instructor for permission to write a Deferred Examination. Any such application must be accompanied by required supporting documentation and must be submitted within seven working days following the examination.

If the student is not able to contact the course instructor or if the course instructor is not willing to give the student permission to write a Deferred Examination, the student may contact the Director of the Graduate Program, within ten working days following the examination, to submit a request for a Deferred Examination. The Graduate Program Director will forward the request and his/her recommendation to the department Chair (for department based graduate programs) or the Faculty Dean (for programs not located within a department) for consideration and decision.

If not satisfied with the outcome of the request, the student may then refer the matter to the Dean of the Faculty offering the course. If the student is not satisfied with the decision of the Faculty Dean, the student may then refer the matter to the Dean of Graduate Studies. If the student is not satisfied with the decision of the Dean of Graduate Studies, the student may appeal to the Student Appeals Board.

Deferred examinations will normally be written no later than the end of the subsequent graduate term.

 

Senate 568 

14.9 Graduate Supervision, Exit Requirements and Thesis Defences

14.9.1 Graduate Supervision and Supervisory Committees

A. Appointment as a graduate supervisor will be in accordance with the graduate program's procedures for graduate supervision.

Senate 590

B. Each graduate program will articulate a process for mentoring new graduate supervisors.

C. The role of a supervisor is threefold: to advise; to monitor; and to mentor.

Supervisors should be sufficiently familiar with the area of research, or be willing to gain such familiarity, to ensure adequate student guidance is provided.

Supervisors should be sensitive to power imbalances inherent in the student-supervisor relationship and ensure that power is exercised in a manner that serves the interests of the student. Conflicts of interest must be disclosed to the Graduate Program Director in a timely manner. A process for conflict resolution must be outlined in the program’s Graduate Program Handbook.

It is the responsibility of the supervisor and the University to ensure that the student’s research environment is safe, equitable and free from harassment and discrimination.

It is the responsibility of the supervisor and the university to consider whether the resources necessary for the successful execution of the student’s thesis or major research paper are available.

Senate 608

 D. The supervisor, with the student, is expected to develop a realistic timeline for the completion of the program. Normally, this will include milestones for measuring progress.

Supervisors should thoroughly examine written material submitted by the student and make constructive suggestions in a timely manner (normally two to four weeks), preferably in writing. Feedback should be open, honest, fair, and timely.

 Senate 608
 


E. Supervisors and students have a mutual obligation to meet on a regular basis. The frequency of such meetings will depend on the discipline/field of study, type of program, and the student’s progress. At least one, preferably several, meetings should be arranged in each academic term. Supervisors should also be reasonably accessible for meetings requested by their students.

                                                                                                                               Senate 599

F. Each graduate program will ensure that a graduate supervisor and supervisory committee are designated for each graduate student completing a required major research paper or thesis requirement.

G. The supervisor, in consultation with the graduate student, will propose the supervisory committee composition. The committee composition must be approved by the Graduate Program Director and must be in place and operational in a timeframe appropriate to program design and defined in the Program Handbook (e.g., no later than the research proposal stage or before data collection commences).

Senate 608

H. A thesis supervisory committee must at minimum comprise three members, the graduate supervisor and two additional faculty members. At least one of the three must be a full-time Brock University faculty member.  Any changes to the composition of the supervisory committee must be made in consultation with the graduate student and the Graduate Program Director.  The student or any member of the supervisory committee may, with just cause, request in writing a change in the composition of the supervisory committee.

Senate 590

I. A major research paper supervisory committee must at minimum comprise the graduate supervisor and a second reader.

J. The supervisor is expected to work with the student and the supervisory committee to develop a plan for monitoring student progress. The plan must include the supervisory committee’s role in monitoring, as well as the criteria that will be used to determine satisfactory student progress.

Senate 608

K. The supervisor will inform the student and the Graduate Program Director of any anticipated extended supervisor absence. In cases where the absence will be for a period of one month or more, supervisors will arrange for suitable communication methods and/or interim supervision e.g. through the use of supervisory committee members. Such arrangements will be communicated, by the supervisor to the graduate student and the Graduate Program Director.

                                                                                                                             Senate 599, 608

L. If a student's supervisor leaves Brock University during the student's program, the Graduate Program Director has the responsibility to ensure that the student can exercise one of the following options:

i) Remain at Brock and change supervisor and perhaps major research paper or thesis topic.
ii) Remain at Brock and complete the existing major research paper or thesis even though the appropriate expertise may not be available at Brock for supervision. In this case, the supervisory committee may seek advice from experts off campus, or may arrange for the student to work off campus. It will be the responsibility of the supervisory committee (augmented, if necessary, by outside expertise), to advise the student on all matters regarding the major research paper or thesis preparation. The student is not precluded from seeking advice from the former Brock faculty member, but the former Brock faculty member has no privileged position with respect to the major research paper or thesis. The supervisory committee will take precedence in all cases.

iii) Apply to transfer to the university to which the student's former supervisor has moved.

iv) Any special arrangements described in ii) or iii) above must be approved by the Faculty Dean and the Dean of Graduate Studies.

M. If either the graduate student or supervisor wishes to initiate a change in supervisor and the change cannot be resolved at the graduate program level, a request must be presented in writing, with explanation, to the Graduate Program Director, and approved by the Dean of Graduate Studies in consultation with the Faculty Dean and the Graduate Program Director.

Senate 469, 470, 555, 578

N. The Policy on Integrity in Research and Scholarship requires graduate students and their supervisor to sign an Intellectual Property Form indicating their agreement with the University policies and guidelines or indicating any specific arrangements that have been made that differ from these policies and guidelines.

Senate 608


O. The supervisor should discuss with graduate students under his or her supervision, at an early stage of their program, authorship practices within the discipline and encourage the dissemination of research results by publication in scholarly and research journals, presentations at conferences, and seminars.

Senate 608


P. The supervisor should discuss with graduate students under their supervision other relevant university policies, including the Respectful Work and Learning Environment Policy and the Occupational Health and Safety Policy.
                                                                                                                              Senate 599, 608

14.9.2 Graduate Research Proposals

A. Graduate students completing a major research paper or thesis must submit and have approved by their supervisory committee a proposal of research in accordance with the graduate program's procedures.

B. Following approval of the research design, human or animal ethics approval (or any other necessary approval) must be secured prior to the commencement of the research study.

C. As part of the application for human ethics clearance, graduate students must provide a certificate of completion for the Course on Research Ethics (CORE) on-line tutorial.  All graduate students working with human participants and/or data are encouraged but not required to complete the CORE on-line tutorial, whether or not their research requires an application for ethics clearance.

Senate 173, 197, 217, 235, 241, 306, 469, 512, 555, 578,619

14.9.3 Graduate Theses and Research Paper Documents

A. Master's and doctoral thesis documents must adhere to the minimum format requirements outlined in the Faculty of Graduate Studies Thesis Format Specifications.

B. Further regulations regarding thesis format standards, as established by individual graduate programs, will be outlined in the program's procedures and approved by the Dean of Graduate Studies.

C. The format requirements for major research paper documents will be specified by the graduate program, outlined in the program's procedures and approved by the Dean of Graduate Studies.

D. All thesis documents must be submitted and deposited according to the regulations specified in FHB 14.8.5.

E. All major essay and project documents must be preserved and deposited for public display in the graduate program's archive..

Senate 413, 555, 578

14.9.4 Thesis Defences

A. Graduate thesis defences will normally be open defences. A request for a closed defence must be approved by the Dean of Graduate Studies and will be based on certified medical or compassionate grounds.

B. The arrangements for a thesis defence will commence once all members of the supervisory committee have signed off indicating their approval that the student and thesis are ready for defence.

C. The examination committee of a master's thesis defence will minimally comprise the supervisory committee and an external examiner. The approval of the external examiner is the responsibility of the Faculty Dean or designate. With the approval of the Dean of Graduate Studies and the academic Faculty Dean, the external examiner may be external to the candidate's graduate program but internal to Brock University.

D. The examination committee of a doctoral defence will minimally comprise the supervisory committee, an internal examiner (from outside the graduate program but within Brock University) and an external examiner. The approval of the external examiner is the responsibility of the Dean of Graduate Studies or designate.

E. Typically a thesis defence will occur four to six weeks following the external examiner's receipt of the thesis document.  External examiners shall submit their report no later than one week prior to the defence. External examiners shall as part of their report identify whether the thesis is ready for defence and whether the thesis is to be recommended for submission to internal/external thesis award competitions.

F. If the external examiner reports that the thesis is not ready for defence, the student must revise the thesis within a reasonable period of time in response to the examiner's comments and the thesis will then be resubmitted to the external examiner.

G. A decision by the external examiner that the thesis is not ready for defence is binding.

H. A change of external examiner, in exceptional circumstances, must be justified in writing to the Faculty Dean or designate for a master's thesis and the Dean of Graduate Studies or designate for a doctoral thesis.

I. The external examiner's report will be shared with the examination committee and the graduate student prior to the defence. External examiners must be informed of this policy with receipt of the thesis document.

J. The recommended format and procedures for a master's thesis defence are outlined by the Faculty of Graduate Studies.  Each graduate program must submit and have approved by the Dean of Graduate Studies their master's defence procedures. The Faculty Dean or designate will chair master's defences.

K. The required format and procedures for a doctoral defence are outlined by the Faculty of Graduate Studies. The Dean of Graduate Studies or designate will chair doctoral defences.

L.  If a student is unable to attend the defence, or having begun the defence is unable to complete it, for reasons of ill-health, a deferred defence will be granted provided adequate supporting documentation has been submitted.  Requests for a deferral of a defence will be considered on the basis of compassionate grounds or other extenuating circumstances, and will be judged on a case-by-case basis by the Dean of Graduate Studies.  The defence will normally be re-scheduled within one month of the original defence date.

M. Students should typically be given two to four weeks to complete minor revisions which are to be approved by the graduate supervisor and four to twelve weeks to complete major revisions which are to be approved by the graduate supervisor and the chair of the defence.

N. Extraordinary exceptions to these thesis defence procedures must be approved by the Dean of Graduate Studies.

Senate 173, 197, 217, 259, 469, 555, 578, 605

14.9.5 Deposit of Theses

A. A candidate submitting a thesis in partial fulfillment of the requirements governing the award of advanced degrees must deposit the approved thesis with the Brock University Digital Repository before the degree will be conferred.

B. When the thesis is in its final form (following defence), has been approved by the graduate program, and meets FGS Thesis Format Specifications, the student will submit the thesis to the Brock University Digital Repository. The student must also submit to the Faculty of Graduate Studies the Certificate of Approval, the Library and Archives Canada (LAC) Non-Exclusive License to Reproduce Theses, and the Brock University Thesis and Major Research Paper Copyright Licence.

                                                                                                                                   Senate 606

C. Under certain circumstances, (e.g. to protect confidential commercial information, patentable material, pending application, or where immediate commercial publication is anticipated), a graduate student may request a restriction on the circulation of the thesis for up to a period of twelve months.

                                                                         Senate 197, 388, 469, 512, 523, 555, 565, 590, 599

14.9.6 Doctoral Candidacy Requirements

A. Each graduate program offering a doctoral degree is responsible for establishing detailed doctoral candidacy requirements. These requirements must be outlined as part of the graduate program’s procedures and approved by the Dean of Graduate Studies.

Senate 555

14.10 Evaluation

14.10.1 Grading System for Graduate Courses

i) For graduate courses, the grades A+, A, B, C, F, IN (incomplete), IP (In Progress), Pass/Fail, CR/NC (Credit/No-Credit), SA/UN (Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory), NW (Not Withdrawn), or AG (Aegrotat standing) will be recorded on the transcript. Grades A+,A, B, and C are passing grades but graduate credit will only be given for grades A+, A and B (in all graduate programs except the MBA).

ii) For graduate courses in the MBA program, the grades A+, A, B, C, F, IN (incomplete), IP (In Progress), Pass/Fail, CR/NC (Credit/No-Credit), SA/UN (Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory),  NW (Not Withdrawn), or AG (Aegrotat standing) will be recorded on the transcript. Grades A+, A, B, and C are considered to be passing grades and eligible for graduate credit. However, of the twenty half-credits required to complete degree requirements, a maximum of two-half credits at the C level may be used for degree credit and the student must achieve an overall minimum B average in the twenty half-credits that comprise degree requirements to be eligible to graduate.

iii) For graduate courses in the MAcc program, the grades A+, A, B, C, F,IN (incomplete), IP (In Progress), Pass/Fail, CR/NC (Credit/No-Credit), SA/UN (Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory), NW (Not Withdrawn), or AG (Aegrotat standing) will be recorded on the transcript.  Grades A+, A, B, and C are considered to be passing grades and eligible for graduate credit.  However, of the ten half-credits required to complete degree requirements, a maximum of one-half credit at the C level may be used for degree credit and the student must achieve an overall minimum B average in the ten half-credits that comprise degree requirements to be eligible to graduate.

Senate 523, 578, 595

IN (Incomplete) - Is a temporary grade granted to a student, in exceptional circumstances, who has been unable to complete some part of the term work in a course. In the case of the thesis, major essay or project, this should be granted only when the thesis, major essay or project is essentially complete (only minor revisions or thesis defence scheduling needed). This grade must be accompanied by a numerical grade. The grade of IN will lapse 56 days from the last day of classes in each term and the numerical grade will stand, unless both are replaced earlier by the instructor.

In cases in which the IN is not appropriate, an IP grade should be assigned (student re-registers and pays for the course the following term).

Senate 377, 385

IP (In Progress) - With the exception of the thesis, major essay, apprenticeship or project courses, no half credit graduate course shall be denoted IP for more than one term.

Senate 410, 523

A student who receives an IP grade must re-register for a course in the term following that for which he/she receives an IP grade.

Senate 362

Credit/No-Credit - Graduate programs may offer, for graduate credit, courses that carry no grades, and satisfactory work in such courses will be indicated on the transcript by CR and unsatisfactory work by NCR.  No graduate degree candidate can fulfill more than 25% of the minimum program degree requirements by courses of this type.  CR/NCR courses by program are so designated in the Graduate Calendar.

Senate 578 (effective 2011-12)

NW (Not Withdrawn) - When appropriate, the grade NW (Not Withdrawn) may be assigned by the Graduate Senate Committee on Appeals or the Dean of the student's faculty within the specified appeal period and when supporting documentation is supplied by the student.

Senate 523

Pass/Fail - Is applicable to theses and courses completed on Letter of Permission.

Senate 523, 571

SA (Satisfactory), UN (Unsatisfactory) - Is applicable for co-op work terms, internship options and non-credit courses.

Senate 523

AG (Aegrotat standing) - The granting of credit for a course(s), based on the course work already completed, when no further assessment is considered feasible because of illness or other extenuating circumstances beyond the student's control. Students may be granted Aegrotat Standing with the approval of the Dean of the faculty offering the course.

Senate 523

B. The numerical values of the letter grades are:

A+. 90-100

A. 80 - 89

B. 70 - 79

C. 60 - 69 (no graduate credit unless specified otherwise)

F. 59 or lower (no graduate credit)

 

Senate 362 , 523, 571, 578

C. At the beginning of each course, students will be advised in writing of the manner in which evaluation will be carried out, the assignments required of them and their due dates, and the penalties to be levied for late assignments. It is to be understood that the types and weighting of assignments in graduate courses are not subject to the restrictions imposed on undergraduate courses.

Senate 41, 197, 211, 259, 272, 469, 571

D. Grade Reports
Final course grades must be submitted to the Faculty of Graduate Studies two weeks after the end of each sixteen week graduate term (Fall, Winter, Spring).  Final grades for graduating students must be processed earlier to meet the Graduate Record Form deadline.  Final grade reports must be approved by the Graduate Program Director before submission to the Faculty of Graduate Studies.  Any alteration to the grade report must be agreed to by the instructor and the Graduate Program Director.  In cases of disagreement the Faculty Dean shall decide the matter.  Grades received after the deadline will automatically have a grade of NR (Not Reported) recorded for the course.  Grades are unofficial until released by the Faculty of Graduate Studies.

Senate 523, 580, 599

E. After grades have been submitted to the Faculty of Graduate Studies they may not be changed except by submission of a Grade Change Form signed by the instructor and the Chair/Director. Requests made for changes of grade beyond 180 days from the end of term in which the grade was assigned, must also include the signature of the faculty Dean.

Senate 523

F. Overall standing is determined by the cumulative average of grades assigned for all courses taken (whether passed or failed).  A student may repeat no more than one credit and no course may be repeated more than once. In all cases, the grade awarded for a repeated course will supersede the grade from the first attempt at the course, regardless of whether it is higher or lower, and will be used in computation of the student's cumulative grade average. 

Senate 580, 588

14.10.2 Evaluation of Theses and Major Research Papers

A. Major research paper grades shall be reported to the Faculty of Graduate Studies in the usual fashion with letter and numerical grades.

B. If a failing grade is awarded for a major research paper, the student will be withdrawn from the program.

Senate 197, 388, 398, 469, 555, 578

C. Theses grades for Master's and Doctoral programs shall be reported to the Faculty of Graduate Studies as either a Pass or Fail grade. A Pass grade must be further differentiated as one of: Acceptable as is, Acceptable with minor revisions, Acceptable with major revisions.

D. All aspects of the written work as well as the student's performance during the defence must be taken into consideration when determining the grade.

E. Normally, if all but one member of the committee agree on a decision, the decision shall be that of the majority, except when the single dissenting vote is that of the external examiner. If this happens, it must be reported to the Dean of Graduate Studies, who in consultation with the Faculty Dean will determine an appropriate course of action.

F. A failing grade will be awarded if two or more committee members find the thesis unacceptable or if the External Examiner does not approve the thesis.

G. If a failing grade is awarded for a thesis, the student will be withdrawn from the program.

Senate 398, 469, 555

Senate 197, 388, 469, 512, 523

14.10.3 Phrase Matching Software

Instructors may take advantage of a number of different phrase matching software programs for pedagogical purposes and/or to assist them in the detection of plagiarism (e.g. Turnitin.com) during the course of evaluating essays, assignments, major research papers, theses, and other work that is required for a given course. However, if an instructor has decided to employ such systems, students must be informed in writing at the beginning of the course on the course outline. It will be assumed that students who remain in the course, having been informed of the use of such systems, will have agreed to their use. However, circumstances may arise whereby a student must continue in a course despite their principled objection to participate in the use of such systems. In those cases, the instructor must provide such students with a reasonable offline alternative to using the system such as, but not limited to:

1. Require a short reflection paper on research methodology;

2. Require a draft bibliography prior to submission of the final work;

3. Require the cover page and first cited page of each reference source to be photocopied and submitted with the final paper; and/or

4. Require the submission of specified rough notes and drafts.

Senate 597

14.11 Graduate Appeals

All graduate students have the right to appeal academic decisions. An appeal is a request that an academic decision (e.g., a grade or standing in a program) be changed, based on the evidence supplied by the student or that a regulation be waived on compassionate grounds or because of extenuating circumstances.

Appeal decisions (at all stages) will normally be made within 10 working days following receipt of the appeal and communicated electronically to the student as soon as possible.  If the decision cannot be made in the posted timeframe, the student will be contacted to discuss an appropriate time frame for the decision and response.

The procedure of appeal varies according to the type of the appeal. The various procedures are outlined below.

Graduate students are entitled to bring one faculty, staff or student members of Brock University to any appeals meetings.

Senate 617

14.11.1 Types of Appeals

A. Appeal of Grades

i) Students who have a question regarding an academic decision in a course (including grades) must first discuss the matter with the course instructor or their supervisor (in the case of their thesis or major research paper), and the Graduate Program Director.  If not satisfied with the decision/result of the appeal, the student may then refer the matter to the Faculty Dean and the Dean of Graduate Studies who will render a joint decision.  If the student is not satisfied with the decision of the Deans, the student may then appeal to the Senate Student Appeals Board.

ii) Appeals of final grades, including the assignment of a failing grade for non-attendance in a course, must be made within 30 days of the posting of grades by the Faculty of Graduate Studies. Failure of a course itself is not a valid reason for appeal. If the absence of the instructor, or other factors make an appeal within 30 days impossible, the intention to appeal should be indicated to the Graduate Program Director within 30 days of the posting of grades by the Faculty of Graduate Studies.

Senate 617

B. Appeals Related to Academic Requirements/Decisions

i) A request for an exemption to a graduate program degree requirement must be directed to the Graduate Program Director of the student's program. If not satisfied with the outcome of the request, the student may then refer the matter to the Faculty Dean and the Dean of Graduate Studies.  If the student is not satisfied with the joint decision of the Deans, the student may then appeal to the Senate Student Appeals Board.

ii) A request for an exemption to a University degree requirement must be directed to the Faculty Dean and the Dean of Graduate Studies. If the student is not satisfied with the joint decision of the Deans, the student may then appeal to the Senate Student Appeals Board.

iii) Appeals of academic decisions made by the Graduate Program Committee and/or Graduate Program Director (e.g,. required program withdrawal) must be directed first to the Graduate Program Committee or Graduate Program Director who made the decision.  If not satisfied with the outcome of the request, the student may then refer the matter to the Faculty Dean and the Dean of Graudate Studies.  If the student is not satisfied with the joint decision of the Deans, the student may then appeal to the Senate Student Appeals Board.

Senate 597,617

C. Requests for Retroactive Registration and Backdated Withdrawal

i) Within 30 days of the last day of classes, a backdated withdrawal will be considered upon the receipt of a request to the Faculty of Graduate Studies which is supported by documentation verifying medical reasons (Brock University Medical Certificate) or compassionate grounds that prevented the student from withdrawing by the required date for doing so. Requests submitted without supporting documentation will not be considered.

ii) Prior to the last day of the course duration, a request for retroactive registration will be considered by the Faculty of Graduate Studies upon the receipt of supporting documentation that outline the reason(s) why formal registration did not occur. This documentation must be accompanied by a Registration Form signed and dated by the course instructor, and Graduate Program Director, verifying that the student has been in continuous attendance.

iii)Requests under C. i) and C. ii) are considered by, and a decision rendered by the Director of Graduate Studies (or designate). There is no charge for this request.

iv) Students wishing to appeal the decision of the Director of the Faculty of Graduate Studies may refer the matter to the Dean of Graduate Studies. If the student is not satisfied with the decision of the Dean of Graduate Studies, the student may then appeal to the Senate Student Appeals Board.

Senate 617

D. Appeals of Charges of Academic Misconduct

All appeals of academic misconduct decisions made jointly by the Faculty Dean and Dean of Graduate Studies may be appealed to the Senate Student Appeals Board within 30 days of the date of the letter informing the student of the desision and/or penalty.

Senate 597,617

E. Medical Appeals

The University endeavours to acccommodate students whose studies become interrupted, or who may be unable to complete academic work, or white a test or examination due to an incapacitating medical condition.  In these situations, the student must complete the Brock University Medical Certificate and include any relevant medical documentation to support his/her request for academic accommodation based on medical grounds.  The University may, at its discretion, request more detailed documentation in certain cases.

Senate 536, 597,617

14.11.2 Appeals Procedures

A. Method of Appeal to the Student Appeals Board

i) All appeals directed to the Student Appeals Board shall be submitted in typewritten form and must be accompanied by the appeal fee. Electronic requests will be not accepted. Submissions not received in this form will be returned to the student without decision

ii) Appeals must clearly state the arguments and expectations of the student. The responsibility is on the student to demonstrate the validity of the appeal and to provide full and appropriate supporting documentation. Dissatisfaction with, or ignorance or neglect of University policy or published deadlines shall not constitute sufficient grounds for appeal.

iii) Appeals of a charge of academic misconduct shall be submitted within 30 days of the date of the letter informing the student of the decision of the Dean of Graduate Studies.

iv) Appeals of academic decisions must be made within 30 days of the date of the letter informing the student of the academic decision or within 30 days of the mailing date of the Statement of Standing, which informs the student of the academic decision and/or final grade.

v) All appeals shall be submitted, in person, by the appellant (person requesting the appeal), to the Administrative Co-ordinator, Student Appeals Board.

(vi) The Student Appeals Board considers only written submissions and documentation.

vii) Appeals based on emotional or medical problems must be supported by a Student Medical Certificate, Brock University or Brock University Student Health Services Medical Certificate indicating specifically the student's inability to fulfil the requirements being appealed.

viii) Submissions must include any additional documentation not originally provided or available at any previous meeting.

ix) An appeal may be disqualified if received outside the 30 day period.

x) A student may abandon an appeal at any time during the appeal process.

Senate 558

B. Hearings at the Student Appeals Board

i) Meetings of the Student Appeals Board are held in camera, meaning they are not open to the public.

ii) In accordance with the rules of natural justice, students appealing to the Student Appeals Board have a right to a fair hearing. This includes the right to be notified of date at which the student's appeal will be considered, the right to attend and present verbal arguments and the right to question the Dean of Graduate Studies (or the person designated by the Dean of Graduate Studies) or the Registrar.

iii) Students must inform the Administrator Co-ordinator, Student Appeals Board of their intention to attend the meeting.

iv) Students are entitled to bring one faculty, staff or student member of Brock University while attending the meeting of the Student Appeals Board.

v) Where a member of the University community has a close personal relationship, defined as any relationship, arising from being a member of immediate or extended family (parent, guardian, partner, sibling, aunt, uncle, cousin, or in-law) with a student; that person shall not participate in or contribute to that student's appeals hearing.

vi) Where a member of the University community and the student are engaged in activities (academic work, research projects, teaching programs, employment situations, etc.) where the member of the University community is a Faculty supervisor, manager, or in a position of authority; that person shall not participate in or contribute to that student's appeals hearing.

vii) In situations where the relationship of a member of the University community and a student may pose a real, apparent, or potential conflict of interest; both parties must formally disclose in writing the conflict of interest, upon discovery, to the Administrative Co-ordinator, Student Appeals Board prior to the Hearing.

viii) If a student has asked to attend the meeting of the Student Appeals Board, the Dean (or the person designated by the Dean) whose decision is being appealed will be invited to attend that meeting of the Student Appeals Board.

ix) The Student Appeals Board may request the attendance of appropriate individuals to appear before the Board to provide information pertinent to the appeal.

x) Where the appeal is against an assigned final grade, the faculty member named in the appeal will be invited to attend the meeting of the Student Appeals Board.

xi) In instances where a faculty member, Graduate Program Director, or Faculty Dean is named in an appeal, the student's submission will be available to the individual named.

xii) At the request of the student, the written response of the faculty member, Department Chair, Graduate Program Director, Faculty Dean, or Dean of Graduate Studies to an appeal will be made available to the student.

xiii)The student and the Deans, and where applicable the Department Chair, Graduate Program Director and faculty member, will be informed, in writing, of the decision of the Student Appeals Board.

xiv) The decision of the Board is final.

Senate 558, 571

14.12 Awarding of Posthumous Degree

A posthumous degree is awarded at the discretion of the Dean of Graduate Studies on the recommendation of the Graduate Program Director and Supervisory Committee (if applicable). To be eligible, a student for whom such a recommendation is made must normally have completed at least 75 percent of the degree program and have begun the final 25 percent of the program. The notation "posthumous" will be recorded on the student's official record, but will not appear on the diploma.

Senate 565

15. Academic Misconduct

15.1 Preamble

Brock University fosters the pursuit of knowledge and scholarship through the provision of academic programs and a learning environment of the highest quality. Academic Integrity is a core value that supports the University's mission. Acts of academic misconduct will not be tolerated and shall be subject to disciplinary procedures under the University's Academic Integrity Policy

Senate 610

16. Academic Computing and Communications Policies

16.1 Definitions of Academic Computing and Communications Resources

Academic computing and communications resources include:

A. All hardware, software, documentation or educational materials owned, leased or otherwise used by the University for the purpose of serving the computing or communication needs of the University community; and

B. All people employed by the University for this purpose.

16.2 Functions of the Senate Committee on Information Technology and Infrastructure

Pursuant to FHB II: 9.7.1, the Senate Committee on Information Technology and Infrastructre undertakes all those areas of policy and advice having to do with operations and planning for the whole University. The Senate Committee on Information Technology and Infrastructure recommends regarding:

A. The development and effective use of the physical resources of the University;

B. Anticipated growth/contraction of the academic/administrative sectors;

C. The policies and priorities to be adopted by the University concerning computing and communications resources;

D. The academic and administrative structures insofar as they relate to the curriculum, patterns of organization as they affect staff and students, and the effectiveness of academic support procedures and services such as audio-visual aids and clerical, technical and research assistance;

E. University expenditures on computing and communication services;

F. The method of distributing Library acquisition funds;

G. The development of Library services.

16.3 Faculty Entitlement Resources

A. The University will treat as a high priority the development of the capability to provide to each faculty member access to computing or communications resources necessary for her or his teaching or research.

B. It is recommended that the University should strive to make such resources available to each faculty member at no charge if the resources are to be used for purposes of teaching or for purposes of research for which funding for necessary computing and communications resources is not provided.

16.4 Student Entitlement to Resources

16.4.1

It is recommended that a student registered in a program or course for which the use of University computing or communications resources is a requirement is entitled, at no charge, to access to those University resources for the duration of her or his registration in that program or course.

16.4.2

The University will endeavour to treat as a high ongoing priority the facilitation of computing and communications resources for incidental student use.

16.5 General Process for Validating Needs

16.5.1

The general process for the validation of need described in 16.5.2 below must be used if a proposed new academic computing or communications resource, not including faculty resources as outlined in articles 32.02 and 32.03 in the Collective Agreement between Brock University and the Brock University Faculty Association, meets any of the following criteria:

a) its cost exceeds the budgeted amounts already allocated to the Director(s), Dean(s) or other administrator(s) with budgetary control of the Department(s) in which the resource will be used; or

b) regardless of the cost, the use of the resource will be shared by several Departments whose particular needs and application of the resources are reasonably liable to differ; or

c) its combined costs of acquisition and installation exceed $100,000.

16.5.2 A need for a new academic computing or communications resource which meets any of the criteria described in 16.5.1 above must be validated by:

a) a written confirmation of need, signed by the intended academic user(s) of that resource, the pertinent Department Chair(s) and the Dean(s) of the pertinent Faculty(ies); and, in the case of shared resources

b) a written confirmation of need, signed by the manager of each Administrative Department which will use the resource; and

c) a duly recorded confirming vote of Senate on the recommendation of the Committee on Information Technology and Infrastructure, which will especially consider whether acquisition and use of the resource would be consistent with the University's strategic plan for academic computing and communications.

16.6 General Process for Acquisition of Resources

16.6.1 After the need for an academic resource meeting the criteria in 16.5.1 above has been validated using the general procedure in 16.5.2 above, a decision concerning whether to proceed with the acquisition of the resource will be made, in consultation with the Committee on Information Technology and Infrastructure and Senate by the University officers having the level of budgetary authority commensurate with the magnitude of the contemplated expenditure. If the decision is to proceed, then the following general procedure for acquisition must be followed:

A. A resource selection team will be chosen according to the following guidelines:

i) members will include a fair, balanced representation of the users of the new resource;

ii) members will be capable of evaluating prospective products, either by virtue of their own expertise or because they are prepared to engage qualified experts and enlist their aid; and

iii)the number of members will be commensurate with the size of the contemplated expenditure and the complexity of the evaluation process.

The purpose of this team will be to develop, within a targeted time frame, a recommendation to acquire a particular product or set of products. This team will report to the individual or group of individuals who have budgetary authority to make the final acquisition decision.

B. In its work, the resource selection team will remain cognizant of budgetary guidelines and targeted time frames and will proceed through the following steps:

i) development of a list of needs expressed in terms of the users' work;

ii) translation of this list into a list of the broad functions and specific features of the needed resource;

iii) prioritization of functions and features and development of a weighted checklist of all requirements, including desired functions, features, supplier services, useful product life, costs and (if feasible at this stage) product specifications;

iv) meeting with prospective suppliers;

v) product assessment, including checklist utilization, discussion with existing users and hands-on testing;

vi) development of an acquisition recommendation; and

vii) development of information about expected product life, to be communicated to the Committee on Information Technology and Infrastructure to facilitate the updating of its computing and communications strategic planning recommendations, in the event that the acquisition recommendation in the previous point is accepted.

16.7 Approval of Regulations Governing Use of Computing Resources

All policies, rules, regulations or other instructions which are to be published or otherwise issued relating to academic use of University academic computing resources which are available, in whole or in part, to faculty or students (including but not limited to: library computing equipment and laboratories and classroom computers and peripherals) must be submitted to the Chair of the Committee on Information Technology and Infrastructure and be approved by Senate on the recommendation of the Committee on Information Technology and Infrastructure before publication or issuance. In each particular decision, the Committee on Information Technology and Infrastructure will take care to consult with affected faculty if their representation is not assured by the composition of the Committee on Information Technology and Infrastructure.

Senate 559

17. Discipline

17.1 University Committee on Student Discipline

Recognizing that, under the terms of the University Act, non-academic discipline falls within the jurisdiction of the President (see FHB I: 3.1), Senate may recommend that a University Committee on Student Discipline be appointed.

Senate 201

18. Students Rights and Responsibilities

Senate recognizes that, balanced with academic freedom for faculty, are certain responsibilities and student rights. In their university careers, students have the right to expect that faculty will:

A. Discharge their instructional responsibilities with academic integrity.

B. Refrain from differential treatment of individual students on the basis of their actual or presumed membership in, or association with, some class or group of persons.

C. Avoid language and behaviour which in any way demonstrates acceptance of prejudicial stereotyping (e.g., among other things, sexist, racist and agist language).

D. Evaluate student academic performance in a fair and reasonable manner, and by means of appropriate academic criteria.

E. Foster a free exchange of ideas between themselves and their students and allow students the freedom to take legitimate exception to the data, views or methods presented.

F. Comply with current University and/or departmental policies regarding student access to final examination scripts, student discipline (e.g., plagiarism, cheating on examinations), grade appeals and University policy regarding sexual harassment.

Senate 354

19. Awards

19.1 General Regulations

19.1.1 Definitions

a) Categories of Awards

Award: a generic term used in this policy statement to cover scholarships, prizes and awards, and medals.

Bursary: a non-repayable grant to assist academically-qualified students who are in financial need (see section 19.2.1 c) viii below).

Scholarship: a monetary award given on the basis of high academic merit; may also include other areas of achievement (academic merit is interpreted as a minimum average of 75%).

Prize: a smaller monetary award than a scholarship. This category includes book prizes, department/program prizes given at the end of program years or at graduation, and prizes for other areas for excellence. Prizes recognize students' achievements in such areas as academic merit, leadership, commitment, support and participation, research, and professional development.

Medal: a non-financial award made to the top graduating students for the year. Currently, the University awards three major medal categories: one Governor General's Silver Medal, one President's Medal and a number of Dean's Medals.

b) Averages

i) In determining eligibility for awards, a variety of grade averages are used (refer to FHB III: 11.1 for definitions and calculation methods).

ii) For awards based on students' overall academic achievement, the Cumulative Grade Average is used. To break ties, the major average is used.

iii) For determining the Brock Returning Scholar Awards and all renewable scholarships, a sessional average based on the best four credits in the most recent fall/winter session is used.

iv) For determining Brock Transfer Scholar Awards, the Committee uses the Transfer Average (converted to the Brock grading system) as reported by the Admissions Office.

v) For determining preliminary scholarship offers during the admissions process, the Admission Average, as reported by the Admissions Office is used.

c) Student Status

Eligibility: students must be pursuing a Brock degree to be eligible for awards at Brock. Students studying at Brock University on a Letter of Permission or on exchange from another university are not eligible for Brock University awards.

New First-Year (Entering): new student entering Brock University with no credit from a post-secondary institution. Students in International Baccalaureate (IB) and Advanced Placement (AP) programs in secondary schools are considered first-year entering students even if they have received credit for their IB/AP courses.

New Transfer (Transfer): new student entering Brock University with any credit from a post secondary institution.

Returning (Continuing): Student for Purposes of Awards: student returning for study at Brock without having attended another post-secondary institution in the interim, excepting courses taken on a Letter of Permission from Brock or on a recognized Brock Exchange Program.

Full-time: students registered in 3.0 or more credits in fall/winter session are considered full-time. Students on co-op placements are also considered full-time.

Part-time: students registered in fewer than 3.0 credits in fall/winter session are considered part-time.

Satisfactory Academic Standing: students who are not currently under academic suspension or on academic probation are considered to have Satisfactory Academic Standing.

Financial Need: students apply for financial need status by completing the budget-style application/financial profile, requested and evaluated by the Student Awards and Financial Aid Office.

Independent: students are considered to be independent if they:

i) are married

ii) are in a common-law relationship

iii) are a sole-support parent

iv) are separated, porced, or widowed

v) have been out of high school for at least 4 years before the start of this study period

vi) have not been a full-time student at a high school or post-secondary institution for at least 2 years before the current study period

vii) can provide evidence that their family no longer supports them financially.

If none of the criteria for Independent Student apply, students are considered to be dependent. For Dependent Students, parental ability to assist financially is considered in the determination of financial need.

19.1.2 Authority

a) The awarding of scholarships, medals and other prizes is the prerogative of Senate

b) Awards are offered on the authority of the Undergraduate Student Affairs Committee.

c) Only awards administered and approved by Senate or by a University Department are announced at Convocation ceremonies.

d) Contests are not considered an appropriate basis for the awarding of scholarships.

e) If there are no qualified candidates for an award, no award will be made.

19.1.3 Course Load Regulations for Awards

a) Normally, to be eligible for any scholarship or any scholarship renewal, students must have completed four or more credits in the fall/winter term being evaluated, and maintain full-time registration status in the subsequent fall/winter term.

b) Students carrying fewer than four credits because of disabilities or other exceptional circumstances may be considered eligible for awards on the recommendation of the Associate Vice-President Student Services. In these cases, the awards will be based on the student's average for courses completed in the previous 12 months.

c) Students who transfer or withdraw from the University after winning a scholarship may not keep the attached monies, but retain the honour.

d) Students who withdraw before the end of the session or become part-time will lose a portion of their awards for that session, pro-rated from their last date of withdrawal from the University, course or program. Their financial records are reassessed accordingly.

19.1.4 Academic Requirements for Awards

a) Unless otherwise specified in a donor-funded award, students must maintain a sessional average of 80 percent in each session for renewal of all multi-year awards.

b) For continuing scholarships and any awards that apply in a one-year period, the basis of selection is the sessional average of the four previous credits. In the case of a tie, a student who has completed more credits may be privileged, or alternatively, cumulative averages may be considered.

c) Continuing Scholar awards require a minimum sessional average of 80 percent.

d) Continuing scholarships reward ongoing achievement. When a student's sessional average drops below the level prescribed by the scholarship, the scholarship is forfeited for the following year. The award is reinstated in the subsequent year if the sessional average meets the requirement for renewal.

e) For any awards that apply in a one-year period, the basis of selection is the sessional average of the four previous credits. In the case of a tie, a student who has completed more credits may be privileged, or alternatively, cumulative averages may be considered.

f) For any awards based on an assessment of a student's full academic career, the cumulative overall average at Brock is used. Normally, an average computed on a greater number of credits takes precedence. Normally at least the last ten credits in a student's program must be taken at Brock. In the case of a tie, the higher sessional average of the last five credits takes precedence.

g) Donor scholarships with specified constituencies may be awarded to students obtaining an admission average (Entrance scholarships) or sessional average (Continuing scholarships) of no less than 75 percent.

19.1.5 Multiple Awards

a) Donor and government scholarships are awarded in addition to University Entrance or Continuing scholarships.

b) To increase Brock's ability to attract high-achieving students, multiple donor and other awards may be offered to individual students, unless this is precluded by terms specified by the donor. With the exception of Brock Leader awards, where the maximum may be higher, the maximum value per year of multiple awards will normally be the equivalent of one year's expenses including tuition, residence, meals, books and supplies.

19.1.6 Degree Program Eligibility

Brock University Entrance scholarships and Continuing scholarships are limited to students pursuing a first university degree. Transfer students are eligible for Transfer Scholar Entrance awards or Continuing Scholar awards. Students entering the Pre-Service Program of the Faculty of Education are ineligible for university Entrance and Continuing scholarships.

Senate 488

19.1.7 Financial Need

a) For awards with financial need criteria, the Student Awards and Financial Aid Office, under the general direction of the Undergraduate Student Affairs Committee, will assess the level of financial need of individual undergraduate students.

b) In assessing financial need, students' financial choices and wise use of their resources are considered.

19.1.8 Offer and Acceptance of Awards

For new first-year (entering) students, offers of Brock-sponsored entrance awards will be made, along with the Offer of Admission. Only applicants beginning their program of study in the Fall session will receive an offer. No Brock-sponsored scholarship offers will be made after the last Friday of July.

Award offers are accepted by returning the Admission Response Form by the stated deadline date.

The Associate Vice-President, Student Services may authorize an extension to the offer period, when necessary.

Senate 513

19.1.9 Distinguished Graduating Student Award

- Presented to graduating honours students with the highest major average.

- Eligibility: Minimum first-class honours standing (80% major/70% non-major average), except for the Teacher Education recipients which will be selected by the Faculty of Education. In the case of Teacher Education one award will be offered for each of the primary/junior, junior/intermediate and intermediate/senior streams.

- Combined majors may receive Distinguished Graduating Student Awards from both departments/centres.

- Name of the student with the highest major average to be sent to the Chair/Director by the Registrar. (To be done as soon as grades are available). Faculty of Education - Chair of the Teacher Education program to forward the names of recipients to the Registrar.

- Distinguished Graduating Award certificates will be prepared by the Registrar's Office.

- The cash award (cheque for $100) will be requisitioned by the Deans.

- Distinguished Graduating Student Awards will be reviewed by Student Awards in Consultation with the Office of the Registrar to ensure that future student academic achievement is recognized with this prestigious award as programs continue to evolve.

Senate 556, 578

19.2 Financial Need

19.2.1 Brock Scholar Awards

a) Awarded to first-year students based on final admission averages:

Scholarship amounts will increase based on where the student's average falls, in accordance with the following grade ranges:

with 80.0 - 84.9%

with 85.0 - 89.9%

with 90.0 - 92.9%

with 93.0% and above

The Student Awards and Financial Aid Office will review monetary value of the award annually.

Final admission averages will be determined using a student's top 6 (including prerequisites) senior academic credits from an accredited secondary school. (In Ontario, a student's top 6 grade 12U or M credits.)

Senate 513, 553

b) Brock Scholars Awards shall be granted to International Baccalaureate (IB) Diploma holders using the following chart:

Total IB Points (including Diploma Points), Value of Brock Scholars Award

24-29, (same as 80-84.9% on best 6.0 12 U or M courses)

30-35, (same as 85-89.9% on best 6.0 12 U or M courses)

36-39, (same as 90-92.9% on best 6.0 12 U or M courses)

40-45, (same as 93.0% and above on best 6.0 12 U or M courses)

Senate 503, 553

c) In consultation with the Associate Vice-President, Student Services, a Brock Scholars Award may include a guaranteed place in on-campus residences for the four-year duration of their award. Normal application procedures apply.

Senate 503

d) Open to Canadian citizens, permanent residents and international students.

e) To be eligible for a scholarship renewal a student must register full-time and maintain first class standing (minimum 80 percent) in his/her top 4.0 credits in the previous Fall/Winter session. For Programs with study patterns that are prescribed differently, award eligibility will be reviewed after each academic session, on an ongoing basis (i.e., co-operative education programs).

Senate 513

19.2.2 Brock Leader Awards

a) Brock Student Leaders receive a monetary tuition award and special recognition:

- Students receive up to $8,000 ($2000 first year, $2000 renewable x3)

- In consultation with the Associate Vice-President, Student Services, a Brock Leader Award MAY include a guaranteed place in on-campus residences for the four-year duration of the award. Normal application procedures apply.

- An invitation to the President's Student Leaders Event each fall

- Priority registration in Brock's Foundations in Leadership program

Senate 513

b) Current funding permits 15 to 20 awards (number may increase with donor endowments in future):

- Suggested distribution of initial 15 awards for students from across Canada as follows: five from Ontario; three from Quebec; three from the Atlantic provinces; three from the prairie provinces and British Columbia; one from the Yukon, Nunavut, and Northwest Territories.

- If there is no qualified candidate for the award in a geographic region specified, the award may be re-distributed to another qualified candidate from another geographic region.

c) Normally, at least one award shall be made to an entering student in each faculty each year.

Senate 529

d) Selection is based on the following factors:

- Admission average (minimum 80 percent) and personal leadership activities (e.g. excellence in fine arts, writing, debating; excellence in science; involvement in school leadership/government; extracurricular activities beyond the student's local school class requirements; significant citizenship contributions).

- A student's financial need may also be considered.

Senate 513

e) Additional criteria:

- A minimum sessional average of 80 percent (calculated on best 4 credits) must be maintained for renewal.

- Receipt of a Brock Leader Award does not exclude students from consideration for any other award at Brock.

Senate 513, 529

19.2.3 Brock Transfer Scholar Awards

a) On a limited basis and in consultation with the Associate Vice-President, Student Services, a Brock Transfer Scholar Award MAY be awarded to students transferring to Brock after first year from another Canadian university and to students transferring from an approved university transfer program.

b) Total Award values depend on the student's average each year, with renewable values set to correspond with Brock Continuing Scholar awards.

Monetary value of award will be reviewed annually by the Student Awards and Financial Aid Office.

In consultation with the Associate Vice-President, Student Services, a Brock Transfer Scholars Award MAY include a guaranteed place in on-campus residence for the duration of the award (normal application procedures apply).

Senate 513

c) Initial award is based on first-year university or college transfer average, calculated on four full-course credit equivalents, using the grade conversion scales established by Brock's Office of Admissions.

19.2.4 Brock International Baccalaureate Scholar Awards

a) Awarded to all successful graduates from an IB Diploma program; each Brock IB Scholar receives:

- A recognition award of $500 in the first year (not renewable)

b) Qualification criteria:

- Students must successfully complete an IB Diploma program.

- Open to IB students from all provinces and countries.

Senate 553

19.2.5 Brock International Student Scholarships

a) A recognition award for international students whose first language is not English, pursuing their first undergraduate degree at Brock; the award is comprised of a certificate (copies for student and parent) and $100.

b) Available to students from selected countries.

c) Qualification criteria:

i) Open to new first-year students

ii) Must be admitted to an undergraduate degree program

iii) Must be coming from a target country, and attending on an international student visa

iv) Must have an application admission average of 75 percent or higher

d) This award is not noted on the student's transcript.

19.2.6 Brock Academic Recruitment Awards

a) On a limited basis and in consultation with the Dean, the Director of Student Awards and Financial Aid may offer an additional matching award for new first-year students in the 90 percent and above category, in order to compete effectively with another university's recruitment offer.

b) Values for this matching Academic Recruitment Award will vary depending on individual cases, but will not exceed a total of $4000 per student.

c) Each award will be distributed across four years of the student's program with the renewal requirement of a sessional average of 80 percent.

d) In determining whether to make a matching award offer, several factors will be taken into consideration, including enrolment demand for the program at Brock, tuition and living cost comparison with the other university, and documented evidence of the award offer from the other institution.

19.3 Brock Continuing Scholar Awards (Brock Returning Scholar Awards)

a) Continuing Scholar Awards are recognition awards for students who did not qualify for a Brock Scholar Award on their admission, but whose subsequent academic work at Brock is at scholarship level

Award values are calculated each year on the basis of the student's sessional average, and the awards are made to returning students in September, according to the following grade scale:

* 80-84.9%

* 85-89.9%

* 90-93.9%

* 94% +

Monetary value of award will be reviewed annually by the Student Awards and Financial Aid Office.

Senate 513

b) Students receiving a renewal of a Brock Scholar, Brock International Scholar or Brock Transfer Scholar Award may not receive a Continuing Scholar Award as well.

19.4 Medals

Senate awards medals in three major categories: Governor General's Silver Medal, President's Medal and Dean's Medal.

19.4.1 The Governor General's Silver Medal

The Governor General's Silver Medal is awarded according to directives specified by the Governor General. In the event that the University qualifies for one medal, the medal shall be awarded to the student completing his/her first four-year bachelor degree with the highest cumulative average, having completed a minimum of ten credits at Brock University. In the event that the University qualifies for a second medal, that medal shall be awarded to the student completing his/her first four-year bachelor degree with the second highest cumulative average having completed a minimum of ten credits at Brock University.

A student shall be eligible to win only one Governor-General's Medal as a Brock graduate. Students from both Spring and Fall convocations are eligible; as such the award will be made at the Fall Convocation ceremony. Senate will be notified of the recipient prior to the convocation ceremony.

Senate 503, 539

19.4.2 The Dean's Medal

a) Each Dean's Medal is awarded at Spring Convocation on the recommendation of the Manager, Student Awards. Senate will be notified of the recipients prior to the convocation ceremony.

Senate 539

b) Each Dean's Medal is awarded as follows:

Four-year degrees:

i) To the student graduating with the highest cumulative grade average in each of the Faculties of Applied Health Sciences, Business, Humanities, Mathematics and Science, and Social Sciences. Eligibility is limited to graduands receiving their first four-year degree who have completed ten credits at Brock University with a cumulative grade average of at least 80 percent.

Three-year degrees:

ii) To the student graduating with the highest cumulative grade average in each of the Faculties of Applied Health Sciences, Humanities, Mathematics and Science, and Social Sciences. Eligibility is limited to graduands receiving their first three-year degree who have completed ten credits at Brock University with a cumulative grade average of at least 80 percent.

Bachelor of Education degrees:

iii) To the graduating student in the Faculty of Education who best exhibits academic and professional excellence in the Pre-Service Program, as selected by the Faculty of Education.

19.5 Dean's Honours List

Students are placed on the Dean's Honours List after they have completed five, ten, fifteen and twenty undergraduate credits and have achieved an 80% average on the last set of five credits.

Senate 491, 578

19.6 Bursaries

19.6.1 Authority

a) Bursary applications are screened and bursaries are awarded by staff in the Student Awards and Financial Aid Office under the general direction of the Undergraduate Student Affairs Committee.

b) Applicants for bursaries must demonstrate financial need and have satisfactory academic standing.

c) The Student Awards and Financial Aid Office determines bursary amounts based on the level of financial need.

d) In assessing financial need, due attention is paid to students' financial choices and wise use of their resources.

e) All students receiving emergency student bursaries are expected to attend a counseling session with a Financial Peer Advisor for support and advice regarding budgeting and financial planning.

f) Bursaries are awarded only to Ontario residents.

19.6.2 Bursary Categories

a) The value of Entrance Bursaries is determined annually. They are given to students in financial need who do not receive a Brock Scholar Award.

b) Emergency Bursaries are designed for students who have unexpected major expenses or shortfalls during the course of the school year. The amount varies according to the level of student need and course load of the student. Normally, emergency bursaries have a maximum value of $1200 per year for students carrying four credits or more.

c) Experience Plus Bursaries re given in the form of salary to students hired into Experience Plus jobs that re part of the Experience Plus New Job Creation project.

d) Fourth-Year Bursaries assist students in financial need who wish to continue to a four-year degree program, rather than stopping at a three-year program. Fourth-Year Bursary values vary depending on a number of factors:

- the number of bursary applications overall in relation to funds available

- the individual student's financial need, including overall student loan debt

19.6.3 Academic Requirements

a) To qualify for an Entrance Bursary, students must have an admission average of 75-79.9 percent.

b) For Emergency Bursaries and Experience Plus Bursaries, students must have a cumulative grade average of 60 percent or greater.

c) For Fourth-Year Bursaries, students must have a cumulative grade average of 70 percent or higher and be admitted to, or allowed to continue in, the fourth year of their program.

19.7 Committee Procedures

19.7.1 Entering Student Awards:

a) A Selection Sub-committee shall meet at least ten days before Offers of Admission are sent out to approve the list of recipients of University and Donor Entrance Awards so that offers of awards may be made at the same time as Offers of Admission.

b) A Selection Sub-committee shall meet again as soon as possible after the deadline for students' decisions on accepting the Offers of Admission to reassign those awards not taken up.

c) Award Offer letters are signed by the President on behalf of Senate for Brock Leader awards and for Brock Scholar awards in the 90% and above category.

19.7.2 Continuing Student Awards

a) A Selection Sub-committee shall meet preferably in June but no later than the first week of July in order to inform students of their awards prior to the beginning of BIRT registration for students in years 2, 3 and 4.

b) A Selection Sub-committee shall meet again immediately after registration to reassign any awards not taken up.

19.7.3 Materials Required for the Committee

a) Information is provided to the Committee members normally at least two days in advance of meetings in a format that may be easily understood.

b) Any standing requests for award nominations shall be made to the Deans and Chairs in May so that they may make their nominations from the same data set that the Committee uses and that there be no delays in selection. These request letters, together with the requisite material, are sent by the Registrar.

c) If required by an ad hoc Selection Sub-committee, the Director of Student Awards and Financial Aid seeks clarification in terms or designation of donor awards.

Senate 33, 36, 52, 137, 181, 364, 386, 412, 438, 450, 451, 459, 462, 464, 472, 481* (*entire section 19)

19.8 Awards and Recognitions Listed on the Academic Transcript

The Director of Student Awards and Financial Aid will record student awards and/or student recognitions to be listed on a student's official Brock University transcript.

To be eligible for inclusion on the academic transcript the student award and/or student recognition must:

1. be based on academic merit. Though the award or student recognition may also include other areas of achievement, the primary basis of the award or recognition will be academic merit as defined by the Faculty Handbook (FHB III: 19.1.1);

2. fall under the auspices of Student Awards and Financial Aid. Awards selected by authorities outside of Brock University will not be listed.

Senate 548

20. Institutional Quality Assurance Processes (IQAP)

Link to current Institutional Quality Assurance Processes (IQAP)

Senate 421, 444, 472, 490, 525, 550, 580

21. Approval of new Undergraduate Programs

21.1 Senate Authority

Under the terms of the Brock Act, Senate has the power "to determine the courses of study and standards of admissions to the University and continued membership therein, and qualifications for degrees and diplomas".

21.2 Approval Process

All new undergraduate degrees and new major programs to be offered under the aegis of existing degrees must be approved by Senate upon the recommendation of the Undergraduate Program Committee.

21.3 Required Documentation/Information for All New Programs

A. Appropriate Nomenclature: An explanation for the name of the degree and/or major.

B. Financial Viability: The "Costing of new or Significantly Revised Programs" form must be completed and included as part of the submission.

C. Student Demand: Evidence that there is a demand for the new degree/program on the part of potential students. This may include projected enrolment levels (and the bases for those projections), application statistics, projected origins of student demand (e.g., domestic or international), and the duration of the projected demand.

D. Societal Need: Evidence that there is a need for graduates of the proposed degree/major on the part of society. This may include the probably availability of positions upon graduation (e.g., by letters from potential employers or governmental agencies). In the case of professional programs, their congruence with the regulatory requirements of the profession must be assessed.

E. Duplication: If the proposed degree/major has duplicative similarities to existing programs in Ontario or Canada, reasons for such duplication.

F. Library Resources: Certification from the Library that adequate Library resources are available to offer the program.

G. Information Technology: If significant IT resources will be required to offer the new degree/major, certification from the Director of ITS that adequate resources will be available is required.

H. Decana/Co-operating Department(s)/Centre(s): The Dean of the appropriate Faculty must certify that the new degree/major is an appropriate and desirable addition to the academic program of the Faculty and any co-operating department(s)/centre(s) must certify that they are prepared to participate in the offering of the new degree/major.

I. Program Structure: A detailed description of the proposed degree/major and the proosed Calendar Entry. This should include an outline of how the program is designed, structured and will be delivered so that graduates may demosntrate achievement, in ways appropriate to the values and ambitions of Brock University.

J. Learning Objectives: The proposed undergraduate degree learning expectations (UDLEs) and a statement on how the proposed program is consistent with Brock's mission and the academic plans of the Faculty and the Department/Centre (including their teaching and research strengths).

K. Program name: An explanation of the appropriateness of the program name and degree designation (if a new degree) to program content and if it is consistent with current usage in the discipline and practices at Brock.

L. Admission Requirements: A statement on the appropriateness of the proposed admission requirements (e.g., achievement and preparation) for the learning objectives of the institution and the program.

M. Curriculum: An outine of the appropriateness of the program's structure and curriculum for its UDLEs.

N. Teaching: An outline of the mode(s) of delivery (including, where applicable, distance or on-line deliver) and how these are appropriate to the program's UDLEs.

O. Evaluation of Student Progress: An explanation as to how the proposed methods for the evaluation of student progress are appropriate for the program.

P. Human Resources: Assurances that the number, quality and academic expertise of the faculty in the area of the proposed program are sufficient to meet the demands of the program. Where appropriate, the availability of support staff and of teaching and laboratory assistants should be indicated.

Q. Academic Integration: An evaluation of the probability that graduates of the proposed program will be strategically advantaged to pursue successful subsequent (second, third or professional cycle etc.,) programs, whether at Brock or other institutions of higher learning and/or research both in our regional and nationally/internationally.

Senate 550

22. Postdoctoral Fellows

Brock University accepts the guidelines for Postdoctoral Fellows suggested by the AUCC, and has adopted a set of policies consistent with these guidelines.

AUCC Statement of Principles Regarding Postdoctoral Fellows

Postdoctoral fellows are important members of the University community and make valuable contributions to the academic research environment. This Statement of Principles encourages universities and other research institutions to recognize these contributions and to offer the best working environment possible to their postdoctoral fellows. The document also suggests that universities establish procedures, where they do not already exist, to ensure that postdoctoral fellows are fully integrated into university policies.

1. Universities should define what constitutes a postdoctoral appointment. The definition would over such criteria as the duration of appointment, and length of time since completion of the Ph.D. (or equivalent).

2. Institutions are encouraged to ensure that university policies include postdoctoral fellows, or that there is a policy in place that explicitly pertains to postdoctoral fellows. The appendix attached to this statement is intended to provide guidelines on the type of information that is included in policies on postdoctoral fellows for those universities that do not already have such policies in place.

3. Universities should identify an office that can provide information on institutional policies and procedures to postdoctoral fellows.

4. Universities should provide written letters of appointment (or invitation) to all postdoctoral fellows. The letter would provide details on the duration of the appointment, the amount and nature of the compensation, any benefits offered, and information on the rights and responsibilities of postdoctoral fellows (or a copy of the university's policy on postdoctoral fellows).

5. Universities are encouraged to provide all postdoctoral fellows with an "orientation package" that includes a registration form for postdoctoral fellows and general information about the university. The information provided on the registration form would allow the fellow to be entered into the university's central register, and be issued with an identity card (for access to the library, etc.)

22.1 Brock Policy Regarding Postdoctoral Fellows

Brock University considers that postdoctoral fellows, (PDF's), are an integral part of the University community and contribute to its mission. It therefore wishes to offer postdoctoral fellows official status, enhance the value of their experience, and offer services meeting their needs. Postdoctoral fellows will comply with University policies and will recognize their affiliation with the University in their publications and in their participation in scholarly meetings and endeavours.

22.1.1 Definition of a Postdoctoral Fellow

The University defines a postdoctoral fellow as one who meets the following criteria:

i) The appointee was recently (within 5 years) awarded a PhD or the equivalent;

ii) The appointment is temporary;

iii) The appointment involves substantially full-time research or scholarship;

iv) The appointment is viewed as preparatory for a full-time academic and/or research career;

v) The appointee works under a faculty supervisor in the University;

vi) The appointee is expected to publish the results of his or her research or scholarship during the period of the appointment, jointly with their supervisor, unless some prior alternate agreement is made and agreed to by both parties prior to the acceptance of the appointment, and such an agreement is filed with Research Services;

vii) The intellectual property rights, patents, etc. arising from the work in a faculty member's lab by a post doctoral fellow or other employee reside with the faculty member unless alternate arrangements have been made in writing in advance and filed with Research Services. If either a faculty member or a PDF receives a patent for work done at Brock, the University must receive a non-exclusive license for the use of the object of the patent.

22.1.2 Appointment and Registration of Postdoctoral Fellows

Appointments of postdoctoral fellows are made by the Associate Vice-President, Research and Dean of Graduate Studies, following the submission of a recommendation from the host Faculty/Department. This recommendation must include:

i) The application form (available from Research Services), on which information is requested on: (a) the academic nature of the appointment from the supervisor(s); (b) the support from the supervisor, academic unit and/or the host Faculty; (c) a confirmation of the duration of the appointment, the financial support; and (d) a confirmation of the space, technical (if applicable) and clerical support provided;

ii) A curriculum vitae of the proposed appointee;

iii) An offer letter from the supervisor setting out the details of the appointment for the candidate.

Recommendations should be sent to the Office of Research Services at least one month prior to the expected date of commencement of the appointment. The appointee should register with the Office of Research Services on arrival as well as with Human Resources. Registration must be renewed every year, following a satisfactory report from the supervisor (form to be developed). Appointments do not normally exceed three years.

22.1.3 Services

Upon registration, postdoctoral fellows will have access to the various services offered by the Office of Research Services as well as those offered by Graduate Studies and the University to full-time graduate students: library, health services, sports facilities, computer services, and the Centre for Pedagogical Innovation.  Health Insurance programs are available at applicable rates, subject to citizenship status and funding source. Benefits will be those available under the Brock University Group Benefit Program for Full-time Grant Employees.

22.1.4 Course Fees

Subject to the approval of the supervisor, PDF's can register in undergraduate and graduate courses at the rate applicable to part-time and special students.

22.1.5 Application of University Policies

The established policies of Brock University apply to the responsibilities and activities of PDF's including, for example, intellectual property, research ethics, and sexual harassment policies. In addition, a special Policy on Treatment of Postdoctoral Fellows will be established by an Ad Hoc Committee which includes representation from different stakeholders (e.g., postdoctoral fellows, faculty, administration) in order to resolve conflicts between PDF's and supervisors/academic unit. Until such time, the regulations regarding graduate students shall apply.

22.1.6 Remuneration and Financial Support

It is understood that a PDF can receive financial support in various forms such as fellowships, research assistantships and part-time teaching. Each year, the University establishes an annual minimum total financial support required for a full-time PDF, which will typically be the minimum set by the appropriate Granting Council. In the case of a partial appointment, the minimum required is calculated proportionally. When the PDF's financial support comes from an external research grant, the regulations of the granting agency must be observed as well. In the case of funds granted by the supervisor, the University accepts that, provided the granting agencies allows it and that all parties agree, these funds could be awarded as training bursaries rather than as employment remuneration.

22.1.7 Maternity Leave

Employment Insurance rules apply if a PDF has been employed long enough to have acquired benefit status.

Senate 474

23. Ownership of Student-Created Intellectual Property

The Guidelines also apply to Research Assistants and Post Doctoral Fellows

This document is to complement the University Policy on Integrity in Research and Scholarship. In any apparent contradiction between this document and the Policy, the Policy will be the authoritative document. It is intended as a working guideline for researchers.

23.1 Ownership of Student Created Intellectual Property and Other Works as well as that Created by Research Assistants and Post Doctoral Fellows

For work done by a student, research assistant or post doctoral fellow, Brock has the following guidelines related to the interpretation of copyright and other aspects of intellectual property rights. These guidelines distinguish in general between items done solely by the student and those undertaken as part of a joint research effort.

In the former case, the intellectual property is primarily the student's, but the University reserves certain rights as detailed in the remainder of this section. In the latter case, the intellectual property rights involve the student, the resea4rch supervisor (and possibly other individuals as well), the University, and on occasion the financial sponsor of the research. (If the work is anticipated to have commercial possibilities, it is required that the parties involved agree in writing beforehand on the sharing of any financial returns.

23.1.1 Introduction

While no policy can anticipate or cover all possible situations, the University Policy on Integrity in Research and Scholarship and these guidelines are intended to cover the rights of current and former Brock students, research assistants and postdoctoral fellows both while attending the University, and after they leave the University, whether with or without a degree. Similarly, while it is difficult to provide a definitive definition of intellectual property (IP), the Government of Canada (Consumer and Corporate Affairs Canada: "Intellectual Property: What It Means to You") indicates that there are at least six types of IP:

1. Patents, for inventions and the creation of new kinds of technology;

2. Copyrights, for literary, educational, artistic, dramatic and musical works;

3. Trademarks, for words, symbols or pictures used to distinguish the goods or services of one person from those of another;

4. Industrial Designs, for the shape, pattern or ornamentation of an industrially produced object;

5. Integrated Circuit Topographics;

6. Plant Breeders Rights.

At Brock, given our mission and types of undergraduate and graduate programs, the most likely types of intellectual property to be created includes theses, dissertations, cognate essays, research papers, books, poems, plays, scripts, essays, articles, dictionaries, maps, lyrics, musical scores, sculptures, paintings, photographs, films, videos, tapes, computer software, databases, records, tapes, cassettes, WEB based materials and inventions (new kinds of technology). To be protected by law, an item must satisfy three criteria: (a) it must be an original creation; (b) it must be a specific expression of an idea, not the idea itself; and (c) the item must be fixed in a physical form. These creations may occur via term papers, theses, or dissertations, research or cognate essays, course projects, cases, studio or laboratory assignments, etc.

Ownership rests initially with the creator of the work, unless the creator has been employed to create a work (e.g., research assistant or post doctoral fellow) in which se the copyright rests with the employer. It should be stressed, as well, that once a piece of work has been accepted for publication by a journal or a publisher, in the absence of an agreement to the contrary, it is the publisher who owns the work. Finally, work created while a student, remains his or her property for life after leaving.

Disputes over ownership, in whole or in part, may occur in team or collaborative work, where many individuals may have contributed to the creation of the work over a lengthy period of time. Disputes may also occur when someone other than the creator (i.e., the student) publishes the work after the student has left the University. Or, disputes may rise over authorship credit or the order of authorship for the work. To avoid such disputes, it is required that all members of a "research group" have read these guidelines and completed and signed the "Intellectual Property" form.

23.1.2 Examinations, Reports and Papers Done as Part of Course Requirements

When work that is eligible for copyright is submitted to meet a requirement of a course, the University acknowledges the student's ownership of the copyright, but places the following conditions on the submission of the work to meet course requirements.

a) The original physical document becomes the property of the University. This applies particularly to examination answer scripts, and may also be applied to term papers and other course work.

b) Except for examination answer scripts, the University receives a royalty free, non-exclusive licence to make copies of the work, for internal use within the University, and to circulate the work as part of the University Library collection.

23.1.3 Theses and Master's Project Reports

As with other papers, the University recognizes that the student holds copyright to the finished thesis. Copies of the thesis shall have on them in a prominent place on the title page the international copyright notice. The student is required to sign a licence to the University library and an additional licence to the National Library. These licences grant the two libraries permission to reproduce the thesis and to circulate it, but do not affect ownership of the copyright.

However, the University also recognizes that the ideas in the thesis will often arise from interaction with others. In some cases, this interaction will have been solely with the thesis supervisor; in other cases, a larger research team will have been involved. For this reason, it is understood that the copyright refers only to the written document of the thesis. The ideas themselves - including any advances in theory, data, patentable ideas, or commercial exploitation of the work - may or may not be the exclusive property of the student. For the student who has worked closely with a supervisor, or as part of a research group, the rights to publish, patent or commercially exploit the results of the research are shared with the supervisor and/or the research group, and with the University. In those cases in which the work has been supported in part by research grants or contracts, there may be other conditions affecting any patent or commercial exploitation. (The student should be made aware that such conditions may apply before work begins and bears some responsibility to enquire as to details if they have any concerns.)

23.1.4 Computer Programs

Computer programs written as part of employment duties, as for example by a teaching assistant, are the property of the employer, as specified in the Copyright Act. Computer programs written as part of course work, a project or a thesis may also have value as a potentially marketable intellectual property. The University recognizes that such software may arise in two different ways, and accordingly has two policies. In setting forth these policies, it is understood that in those cases in w2hich software development draws upon other software owned or licenced by the University, the terms and conditions of the licence or purchase must be followed.

a) Where a student develops such software at the direct request of a supervisor, and under supervision, it is assumed that there is joint ownership of the intellectual property rights. In such cases, it is recommended that the individuals involved co-author a working paper documenting the software, rather than including it as an appendix to a thesis or report. Prior agreement between the student and supervisor that this is to be the case would be helpful.

b) Where a student develops such software on his/her own, as for example for an independent project in a course, copyright remains with the student. As a condition of using University computing facilities, the student is required to grant the University a royalty-free licence to use the software. This includes the right of the University to distribute copies of the software to Brock faculty, staff and students for the University's administration, education and research activities. This licence does not include the right to use the software for commercial use.

23.1.5 Research Data

As with computer software, the University recognizes that research is conducted and data are acquired in two different fashions. When the data are acquired as part of a joint or collaborative effort, such as one relying on the equipment within a laboratory, they are not solely the property of the student, although some of the data may ultimately appear in tables or appendices in a completed thesis. As a general rule, such data are the joint property of the student and the research supervisor, either of whom has the right to make them available to other individuals as well. Both student and supervisor are responsible for insuring that proper acknowledgment of the contributions of the student, supervisor, and other members of the research team is made when the data are released in any form.

When the data are acquired through the student's individual effort, and without the use of University laboratories or funding, then they are usually the property of the student making that effort. However, exceptions may occur when the student collects data using research instruments including interview schedules and questionnaires developed wholly or in part by the research supervisor or by some other person or agency. In such instances the right to ownership and/or use of the data may be shared among the parties involved. Given the range of possible alternatives it is not possible to set absolute guidelines in advance covering all such situations. Consequently, it is strongly recommended that students and supervisors make clear agreements in advance concerning the ownership and use of data collected in this fashion. Ownership of data may also be affected by the terms of a research contract that has supported the work.

23.1.6 Equipment

If University resources have been applied to the construction or design of equipment, it is not the property of the student, but of the University. Equipment constructed or designed as part of course or thesis work is the property of the student if the work, materials, and workroom space have been provided by the student or other non-University source. Ownership of newly constructed equipment may also be specified in a research contract that has supported the work.

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24. Policy on Safety and Liability for Field Research

24.1 Preamble

Brock University is committed to ensuring that the scholarship and research of its members – faculty, staff, students, and associated research personnel -- is carried out in a safe and responsible manner. In particular, Brock recognizes the importance of encouraging faculty members, staff and students to engage in field research beyond its geographical (corporate) boundaries. The University also recognizes that all research involves the assessment and management of some risk and that field research may involve more and/or different kinds of risk than other forms of scholarship. It is the policy of the University to encourage such activities as may be appropriate to the scholarly needs of the research programs of its faculty members, students, affiliated research personnel, and staff and to take every reasonable precaution to protect the personal health, safety and security of its participating members.

Risk in field research may include, but is not limited to, the risk of harm to physical health, emotional well-being, and personal safety. These risks may arise because of the nature of the research itself, from the physical climate, or from political, social, economic or cultural environment of the field work location.

While the University encourages its faculty, staff and students to participate in field research as may be appropriate to their discipline and research interests, the University and its faculty, staff and students are expected to take every reasonable measure to protect the health and safety of those engaged in field research. In practice, responsibility for safety in field research rests primarily upon the individuals who plan, direct, supervise and carry out the research on location. Such persons are expected at all times to exercise good judgment, and to take all reasonable care in the circumstances to protect the health and safety of participating team members.

The University's policy requires that due diligence be exercised by all parties in giving attention to the nature of, and the means for eliminating, avoiding and, in the last instance, mitigating, the categories of risk that may be associated with each location and kind of field research. The University requires that participants who enter into field research possess an informed understanding of the risks associated with field research and that they have consented to a plan for dealing with such risks.

24.2 Scope and Definition of Field Research

For the purposes of this policy, Field Research is defined as work and academic activities conducted primarily for the purpose of scholarly research and creativity, undertaken by faculty members, students, associated research personnel and staff of the University beyond the geographical boundaries of University property. Where research within the geographical boundaries of the University property pose risks to participants (e.g., University-owned, leased or managed field stations, escarpment or Lake Gibson), the requirements for due diligence contained in this policy shall be enforced.

Field research activities may range from minimal or low to high risk. By way of example, field research may include participant/observation research in school classrooms, ethnographic, anthropological and geological research in Asia, historical or comparative literature scholarship in South America, political studies in Canada, field studies in agricultural settings, or visits to other academic institutions. The Principal Investigator is obliged to conduct a risk assessment obligation for each new field research project that then will be reviewed by the Department Chair and filed with the Office of Environment, Health and Safety. Under normal circumstances, travel for conferences, seminars or visits to other North American academic institutions are considered to incur low risk and therefore do not require formal departmental notification.

The Office of Environment, Health and Safety is required to coordinate with the Office of Research Services to ensure that field research involving human subjects or the use of animals as defined by University Policy and the Canadian Council on Animal Care and Use has necessary research ethics approval prior to its authorization. Field research involving human subjects or the use of animals cannot proceed prior to receipt of approval from the Research Ethics Board (Human) or Animal Care and Use Committee.

24.3 Concerned Parties

The Ontario Environment, Health and Safety Act (OHSA) place the onus for compliance with legislation on the organization and specifically on the supervisory individuals within an organization.

The following parties share concern for field research safety:

1. each individual in the field;

2. the person in the field responsible for leading a field team of two or more;

3. the person who has responsibility for supervising the academic study of an individual whose work in the field is a necessary part of such study;

4. the Faculty/Department/Centre that is the academic home of the research; and

5. the University, including but not limited to the Office of Environment, Health and Safety, the Office of Research Services, Human Resources, the Office of the Vice-Provost and Associate Vice-President Student Services, the Office of the Vice-President, Research and Dean of Graduate Studies, and the Faculty of Graduate Studies.

24.4 Requirements for Reasonable Care

The safety standards at Brock University must, at a minimum, meet the requirements of any applicable Provincial or Federal legislation and codes of practice or regulations of sponsoring agencies or professional associations. As Brock falls under the education sector, adherence to the OHSA as well as additional regulations and guidelines (http://www.brocku.ca/oehs/) is considered the minimum.

In addition, Brock has a duty of care to ensure the well being and preparedness of its faculty, staff and students, to work in the field, both emotionally and physically. Thus, while the University has an obligation to provide Principal Investigators with relevant information, education and skills; the Principal Investigators (faculty members), Deans and Department Heads must ensure that all research personnel (e.g., post doctoral fellows, technicians, visiting scientists, students and volunteers) for whom they are directly responsible, work in compliance with all applicable Acts and Regulations, are provided with the necessary training prior to involvement in any field research, and are made fully aware, in writing, of all potential health, safety or security risks before agreeing to participate.

The following are general areas in which those involved must exercise reasonable care to secure safety in field research. A specific project may require additional guidelines.

1. assurance and documentation of a satisfactory state of health and immunization of the participants for purposes of travel to and participation in field research at the particular location;

2. assurance of adequate education and training in relevant field safety, including but not limited to first aid or advanced emergency training, or fire arm safety;

3. assurance that all participants are informed in writing of all potential health, safety and/or security risks associated with the field research project;

4. availability of first-aid supplies and expertise;

5. availability of appropriate personal clothing, personal equipment and field equipment to support the research;

6. arrangements for appropriate transportation to, at, and returning from the location of the field research;

7. availability of appropriate food and accommodation on site and during travel to and from the site;

8. provision of information about requirements of foreign governments and other jurisdictions (e.g. Northwest Territories, aboriginal authorities) concerning travel to and research at the site;

9. provision of information prior to departure to the study area on the character to the extent known) of distinctive local risks and dangers;

10. provision of information prior to departure about insurance needs, availability and limitations;

11. arrangements for continuous responsible leadership of all field teams;

12. definition prior to departure, and on a continuing basis on the site, of the tasks and responsibilities assigned to each participant;

13. recognition of the right and responsibility of an individual to exercise personal judgement in acting to avoid harm in situations of apparent danger;

14. availability of procedures for contacting the University to obtain assistance in a crisis situation and for the evacuation of field personnel;

15. vailability of procedures for the University to contact field personnel; and

16. consideration of the need for accommodating researchers with disabilities, including financial implications.

24.5 Responsibilities

24.5.1 General responsibilities for implementation of this policy.

1. The individual field researcher or research team member acknowledges the risks of the particular field project and understands the Requirements for Reasonable Care, and confirms these matters in writing to the departmental chair or equivalent.

2. The Principal Investigator is responsible for

a. approving the composition of the field team, unless a dependent of the Principal Investigator is to be included in the team in which case the composition of the team shall be approved by the departmental chair or other academic administrator to whom the supervisor reports prior to the field research;

b. establishing a clear chain of responsible leadership that is understood by all participants, which is in place at all times and placed on record in writing with the departmental chair or equivalent prior to the field research;

c. alerting each individual field researcher or research team member to the Requirements for Reasonable Care and of the risks of the particular field project prior to the field research; and

d. obtaining the written confirmation required in section 1. above prior to the field research.

3. The Faculty/Department/Centre’s responsibility is to disseminate University policy on field research safety and to require its diligent application.

4. The central administration, specifically the Office of Environment, Health and Safety, the Office of Research Services, Human Resources, the Office of the Vice-Provost and Associate Vice-President Student Services, the Office of the Vice-President, Research and Dean of Graduate Studies, and the Faculty of Graduate Studies; is responsible

a. to inform annually all faculty members and other concerned parties about this policy and the procedures by which it will be implemented;

b. to provide an on-going program of education and skills training for faculty, staff and students engaged in field research, and

c. to report annually to the Senate and the Board on the application of the policy and issues arising from its administration

5. More specifically, in a coordinated and collaborative manner, these central administrative units, have the following responsibilities:

a. The Vice-President, Research and Dean of Graduate Studies and the Associate Vice-President, Human Resources, have joint responsibility for the implementation and application of the policy within the University.

b. Where graduate student thesis and project research requires field research, the Faculty of Graduate Studies is responsible for ensuring that graduate students engaged in field research activities are fully informed of their obligations under this policy and are fully aware of the potential health, safety and/or security risks before agreeing to their participation in the research program or project.

c. Where faculty research requires field research, the Office of Research Services is responsible, with the Office of Environment, Health and Safety and respective Deans, Chairs and Directors, for ensuring that faculty researchers are fully informed of their obligations under this policy and have assessed the potential for health, safety and/or security risks before embarking on the research project.

d. The Office of the Vice-Provost and Associate Vice-President Student Services is responsible for the application of the project to sanctioned undergraduate research programs.

e. The Office of Environment, Health and Safety is responsible for providing on-going education and training programs for University faculty members, staff members, and students in field research safety. Such programs shall be designed in collaboration with University faculty researchers and/or external experts as required and as appropriate.

f. The Office of Environment, Health and Safety is responsible for monitoring compliance with this policy and the filing of field research safety reports and incident reports (e.g., accident reports).

g. The Office of the Vice-President, Research and the Office of Research Services are responsible for monitoring faculty members’ compliance with this policy and the policies and procedures of sponsors that may affect field research safety.

h. The Office of the Provost and Vice-President Academic, through Human Resources, will inform all new faculty appointments of the provisions of this policy.

24.5.2 Specific responsibilities

24.5.2.1 Deans, Department Chairs/Centre Directors

The Dean is responsible for:

a) ensuring that the Faculty has a specific Field Safety Protocol in place (this may be graduated for specific types or projects or for projects that take place in specific geographical/political regions);

b) advising members of the Faculty of the provisions of this policy; and

c) establishing procedures (e.g., a Safety in Field Research Committee) to:

a. review the assessment of the risk associated with the nature of the field research proposed, in accordance with the guidelines provided in Appendix 1.

b. establish the level of risk, upon the advice and guidance of Environment, Health and Safety Officer, where appropriate;

c. approve and sign the "Field Research Safety Planning Record" (Appendix 2);

d. file a copy of the "Field Research Safety Planning Record" (Appendix 2) with the Environment, Health and Safety Officer, as appropriate; and

e. monitor compliance with this policy within the Faculty.

Where delegated by the Dean to the Department or Centre, the Chair/Director is responsible for:

a) ensuring that the Department or Centre has a specific Field Safety Protocol in place (this may be graduated for specific types or projects or for projects that take place in specific geographical/political regions);

b) advising members of the Department/Centre of the provisions of this policy;

c) establishing procedures to:

a. review the assessment of the risk associated with the nature of the field research proposed, in accordance with the guidelines provided in Appendix 1.

b. establish the level of risk, upon the advice and guidance of Environment, Health and Safety Officer, where appropriate,;

c. approve and sign the "Field Research Safety Planning Record" (Appendix 2);

d. file a copy of the "Field Research Safety Planning Record" (Appendix 2) with the Environment, Health and Safety Officer, as appropriate; and

e. monitor compliance with this policy within the department and by all faculty members.

24.5.2.2 Principal Investigator

The primary responsibility for compliance with this policy lies with the Principal Investigator. The Principal Investigator is defined as the person leading and guiding the specific research project.

In particular, the Principal Investigator is responsible for the following:

a) identifying and documenting the health, safety and/or security risks associated with the field research project, including risks of assault, robbery, kidnapping or other forms of personal injury, and undertaking to avoid or mitigate those risks

b) approving the composition of the field team. The University will not normally approve dependents of team members and the PI as members of a research team;

c) in consultation with the team members and using Appendix 1 as a guide, determining the specific health and safety risks and the level of risk associated with them for the particular field project;

d) identifying appropriate controls and safety procedures, including methods to deal with any emotional or psychological distress issues created in the field research environment, i.e. sensitivity training is be required when entering poverty stricken areas or war zones;

e) providing for (i) a pre-trip planning session(s), which includes a briefing on the specific nature of the trip, its challenges and precautions which must be taken, (ii) an in-country orientation session and (iii) a post-trip debriefing session, if appropriate.

f) ensuring that the appropriate controls and safety procedures are implemented, including the provision or use of appropriate protective equipment, procedures, and training, to deal with the risks as far as is reasonably practicable;

g) establishing a clear chain of responsible team leadership that is understood by all participants;

h) ensuring that each individual field researcher or research team member is aware of the provisions of this policy, the general guidelines outlined in the Guidelines for Safety in Field Research document, the risks of the particular project, and the appropriate controls and safety procedures in place;

i) ensuring that each field team member is made aware of the specific risks associated with the field research and the specific requirements which need to be met for participating in the research (e.g.: specific safety training and training in the use of fire arms or equipment, visas, immunizations, health insurance requirements) and obtaining the written, voluntary informed consent from each participant in the Field Research or obtain a completed, signed waiver from all volunteer participants in the Field Research;

j) maintaining written documentation of the steps taken above, including the completion of the "Field Research Safety Planning Record", both of which are to be placed on record with and approved by the Department Chair, or equivalent, prior to departure on Field Research; and

k) ensuring that the University is informed of communications procedures and contact numbers for regular and emergency circumstances.

24.5.2.3 Team Leader

The Team Leader may be the Principal Investigator or may, in the absence of the Principal Investigator, be another member of the team, as designated by the Principal Investigator.

In particular, the Team Leader is responsible for:

a. identifying and documenting the health, safety and/or security risks associated with the field research project and undertaking to avoid or mitigate those risks;

b. ensuring implementation of the controls and safety procedures established by the Principal Investigator;

c. ensuring that the team members use the appropriate safety equipment and follow appropriate safety procedures and medical precautions;

d. conducting ongoing risk assessments during the field research and reporting any new hazards to the Principal Investigator;

e. dealing with and resolving any safety concerns which arise in the field;

f. maintaining regular contact with the Principal Investigator and/or departmental contact wherever/whenever possible; and

g. informing the Principal Investigator and departmental contact of all substantive incidents that occur in the field in a timely fashion.

24.5.2.4 Team Members

Team members are defined as all other team members, other than those previously defined and include students, staff and volunteers.

Each member of the field research team is responsible for:

a. familiarizing themselves and acknowledging the risks of the particular field project to their health, safety and/or security and, with the Principal Investigator and Team Leader, identify and implement methods for avoiding or mitigating those risks;

b. using the appropriate protective equipment provided or required and following the procedures established by the Principal Investigator;

c. obtaining the necessary training and skills required to conduct the field research in a safe and responsible manner;

d. understanding the General Requirements outlined in the attached Guidelines;

e. working safely and in a manner to prevent harm to himself/herself or to others;

f. providing evidence of a satisfactory state of health and immunization status;

g. providing information of and demonstrating adequate health insurance coverage;

h. providing written consent of the above to the Principal Investigator or department/unit head;

i. reporting any identified hazards to the Team Leader or Principal Investigator; and

j. reporting all incidents to the Team Leader in a timely fashion.

24.5.2.5 Solitary Field Researcher

Solitary field research activities in remote areas require special care and attention to and assessment of risks. In some cases, field research involving particularly hazardous locations or activities should be conducted in groups of two or more and only after full assessment of the risks and available controls and safety procedures has been made.

In circumstances where field research necessitates solitary fieldwork (e.g., specific forms of anthropological or scientific research), the Solitary Field Researcher assumes the responsibilities of Team Leader (Section 3.3) and Team Member (Section 3.4). A method of regular communication should be implemented, including steps to follow if a scheduled contact is not made.

In some extreme cases, e.g., where the proposed field research will occur in a highly unsettled political environment, the University may recommend that a solitary researcher not participate in a research activity at a particular time and/or may decline to authorise the research under the University’s risk management policies. Under these circumstances, it is the responsibility of the researcher to assess whether he/she will undertake the field research at her/his own risk.

24.5.2.6 Refusal of Unsafe Work

Every individual field researcher has the legal right to refuse, at any time, to participate in any activity that he/she feels may endanger his/her health or safety or that of another person.

24.6 Other Policies and Procedures

All other University policies and procedures apply to field research, including but not limited to the use and care of animals, ethical review of research involving human subjects, and sexual harassment.

24.7 Policy Implementation

All members of the University community have a responsibility for the implementation of this policy and adherence to its terms and conditions. More specifically, Departments, Faculties, the Office of Research Services, the Office of Environment, Health and Safety, and Human Resources have specific responsibilities for its implementation and monitoring. These responsibilities are detailed in Section 3.

24.8 Policy Review

The Senate Research and Scholarship Policy Committee, through the Office of Research Services, in collaboration with the Office of Environment, Health and Safety and Human Resources, will review the policy and its implementation every three years. Recommendations for procedural changes will be reviewed by the Senate Research and Scholarship Policy Committee and implemented as appropriate, following consultation with Deans and Departments.

24.9 Appendices

Appendix 1 is designed to help determine whether the field research poses low or higher risk factors.

Appendix 2 is designed to assist the field research leader to plan for the safety requirements needed for the specific field trip. The form is flexible enough to apply to a broad range of activities, and can certainly be customized to the individual researcher's needs. It is strongly suggested that the form be used as a planning tool; it will flag most key issues that may require some time to address.

Appendices 3 through 9 provide general information regarding insurance and benefits coverage, travel immunization, and travel advisories, and are intended to assist with field research planning and preparation. These appendices should be consulted prior to initiating off-campus travel. Senate 505

Click here to view Appendices 1-9

25 Policy on the Establishment and Review of Research Centres and Institutes

25.1 Preamble

The establishment of Research Centres and Institutes assists research and teaching in a university in many ways.  These structures encourage scholarly research and creativity among collectives of faculty,  post-doctoral fellows, graduate students, librarians and other researchers that challenge traditional and established disciplinary boundaries.  They allow for an identity to be created through which individuals or teams may apply for internal or external research grants and contracts that will enhance the reputation of the University, provincially, nationally and internationally.

Given the expansion of Brock's research enterprise, and the development of transdisciplinary research clusters as an institutional priority, a policy governing how Research Centres and Institutes are created, approved, reviewed and, where appropriate, disbanded is essential.  The following policy and procedures provide guidelines for the establishment of new Research Centres and Institutes, and the lines of reporting for each.

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25.2 Definitions

25.2.1  Research Centre

Research Centres are Faculty-based collectives with a defined mission, created to explore areas of research and scholarship of importance to the collective and to the University.  They may include faculty, postdoctoral fellows, graduate students, librarians, and other researchers.  Research Centres are managed by an academic director with an advisory committee, and report to a Faculty Dean.  They may choose to offer academic programs under the direction of the Faculty Dean, and in such cases faculty may be directly appointed to them.

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25.2.2  Institute

Institutes are cross-Faculty research collectives with a defined mission.  They may include faculty, postdoctoral fellows, graduate students, librarians and other researchers (including adjuncts appointed from other research institutions) who share a particular research focus of strategic importance to the University.  Institutes are non-teaching units.  Any academic programs affiliated with an Institute are housed in one of the academic Faculties with oversight by the Faculty Dean.  Faculty are associated with Institutes but are not directly appointed to them.  Institutes are administered by an academic director with an advisory committee and report to the Vice-President, Research.

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25.3  Process

25.3.1  All new Research Centres and Institutes must be approved by Senate upon the recommendation of the Senate Research and Scholarship Policy Committee.

25.3.2  Research Centre

A proposal to establish a Research Centre is submitted to the Dean of the Faculty that will serve as its administrative home and, with that Dean's endorsement, following discussion with interested departments and programs, to the Senate Research and Scholarship Policy Committee for recommendation to Senate for approval.  The creation of a Research Centre requires the approval of the Dean of the Faculty involved.  See FHB 25.4.1 I. below.

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25.3.3  Institute

A proposal to establish an Institute is submitted to the appropriate Deans and the Vice-President, Research, and with their endorsement, following discussion with interested departments and programs, to the Senate Research and Scholarship Policy Committee for recommendation to Senate for approval.  The creation of an Institute requires the approval of the Vice-President, Research.  See FHB 25.4.1. I. below.

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25.4  Application Procedure

25.4.1  Required Documentation/Information for New Research Centres and Institutes

a. Name of Research Centre/Institute

b. Description and Justification. The purpose of the Research Centre/Institute, the scope of activities envisaged, the proposed start date, likely research benefits and opportunities, why existing departments or Centres are unable to accommodate the initiative.

c. Constitution. The objectives of the Research Centre/Institute, its organizational structure, responsibilities and roles of its committees, criteria for and categories of membership, privileges and responsibilities of membership, voting procedures and the terms and conditions of any involvement by other universities, organizations, or personnel.

d. Management. The University officers to whom the Research Centre/Institute will report and in whom financial responsibility is vested.

e. CV’s For each  member (e.g. degrees, employment experience, professional activities, research interests, research funding record for the last five years, summary of publication record, titles of representative publications). Formats for submission of CVs include: P&T, CIHR, NSERC, or SSHRC.

f. Facilities. A list of available research facilities identifying strengths and weaknesses of the inventory, future requirements and a proposed strategy for obtaining such facilities. If dedicated office space is required, identify how many individuals will be housed in the space and how costs of renovation or refurbishing will be supported.

g. Budget. A detailed budget proposal for the first five years of the proposed Research Centre/Institute indicating anticipated income from all sources (e.g., University, government, industry, overhead, royalties, etc.) as well as proposed expenditures and disbursements and Advancement activities where anticipated and planned. 

h. Statements of Sanction and Commitment. Signed statements of support by appropriate Chairs of Departments and Faculty Dean (s), and, in the case of Institutes, the Vice-President, Research, including any commitments or agreements to provide space, teaching relief or other resources, including overhead from contracts.  As information supplemental to the application, a statement of anticipated library resources, IT requirements, and any other specified University service must be prepared and signed by the appropriate administrator.

i. Statement of Faculty Dean (for Research Centres) or Vice-President, Research (for Institutes). This statement should indicate that any legal, safety or corporate concerns with respect to the proposed Research Centres/Institute have been satisfactorily addressed. Agreements with respect to intellectual property and other issues may be required.  The Faculty Dean or the Vice-President, Research should also comment on the potential involvement of any other universities or organizations and the need to facilitate necessary administrative agreements.

j. Graduate Students. Graduate students may be affiliated with a Research Centre or Institute by virtue of the location of their graduate program within a Research Centre's governance, or (as Graduate Student Fellows) by virtue of their supervisor's relationship with a Research Centre or an Institute.  Where a graduate program already exists and students are to be newly affiliated with a Research Centre or Institute, the relevant Graduate Program Director shall acknowledge the suitability of the training and learning environment.  Where a new graduate program is to be created under the aegis of a proposed Research Centre, the procedures for new program creation will follow Brock's Institutional Quality Assurance Process (IQAP) as administered by the Senate Academic Reviews Committee (ARC).

k.  Additional Information.  Any additional information germane or supplemental to the application that is not covered by the above, including specific requests made by committees and administrators.

l.  After the application is approved in principle by the Faculty Dean (for a Research Centre) or the Vice-President, Research (for an Institute), an executive summary consisting of items a) through d), along with a list of faculty whose CVs have been submitted as charter members of the Research Centre/Institute and relevant supplemental material will be prepared by the proposal committee and posted, for comment to the relevant Dean (for a Research Centre) or the Vice-President, Research (for an Institute), on the webpage of the University Secretariat under the heading "Proposed New Research Centres and Institutes."  The posting  shall remain in place for a minimum of 21 days preceding the application's review by the Senate Research and Scholarship Policy Committee.

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25.4.2 Approval Mechanism

The Senate Research and Scholarship Policy Committee will normally forward to the Senate one of the following recommendations within 60 days of receipt of the proposal.

a. Full approval: normally for five years.

b. Probationary Approval: normally for a three-year period during which specific objectives or deficiencies must be met or arrangements finalized, as outlined by the Senate Research and Scholarship Policy Committee.  In the annual report of the Research Centre/Institute, progress towards these objectives or arrangements or correction of deficiencies must be addressed. During the three-year probationary period, but after the first annual report has been filed, application for full approval (a subsequent 5 years) can be made.

c.  The Senate Research and Scholarship Policy Committee will not forward to Senate a proposal for a Research Centre/Institute that, from the Committee’s perspective, does not meet the minimum requirements for approval or that requires substantial revision prior to reconsideration by the Committee.  In arriving at such a decision, the Senate Research and Scholarship Policy Committee will have consulted with other Senate or University committees, as necessary.

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25.5 Review and Renewal

Research Centres and Institutes will produce an annual report for submission to the relevant Faculty Dean (for Research Centres) or the Vice-President, Research (for Institutes).

Six months prior to the expiration of the term of approval, the Chair of the Senate Research and Scholarship Policy Committee, through its secretary, shall invite a request for renewal, a self-study document, and copies of the annual reports from the Director of the Research Centre/Institute.  After receiving these submissions, the Chair of the Senate Research and Scholarship Policy Committee shall consult as appropriate with Departmental Chairs, Program Directors, Faculty Deans and the Vice-President, Research, with respect to the operations and effectiveness of the Research Centre/Institute during its term and report to the Committee.  Upon completing its review, the Senate Research and Scholarship Committee may recommend:

1. that the term of the Research Centre/Institute be extended for an additional three to five years; or

2. that the term of the Research Centre/Institute be extended for an additional three to five years subject to modifications recommended by the Senate Research and Scholarship Policy Committee.

3. that the Research Centre/Institute should be disbanded, in which case the Senate Research and Scholarship Policy Committee shall refer the matter to the Dean (in the case of a Research Centre) or the Vice-President, Research (in the case of an Institute).

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25.6 Appendix  - Proposed Format for the Self-Study

a. Name of the Research Centre/Institute

b. Statements concerning the way in which the Research Centre/Institute has fulfilled its mission, and objectives. The following should be addressed where appropriate:

i. Does the Research Centre/Institute continue to meet a need within the University and the broader community? How has the need been assessed?

ii. Does the mission of the Research Centre/Institute remain compatible with the Mission, Goals and Objectives of the University?

iii. Does the Research Centre/Institute duplicate any other entity within the Province? If so, has the Centre/Institute made connections and developed collaborations with these other research entities.

c. Listing of academic units involved; faculty, graduate student and other researcher involvement. A list of research funding obtained and research outputs of the Research Centres/Institute members.

d. Identification of the role of non-university organizations.

e. Resource implications: potential outside funding and potential internal demands. How has the Research Centre/Institute managed to obtain the necessary resources to fulfil its mandate and mission?

f. Signature(s) of the Director of the Research Centre and the Faculty Dean (for a Research Centre) and the Director of the Institute and the Vice-President, Research (for an Institute).

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26. Policy on Protecting Students as a Result of a Disruption of Academic Activities

The University recognizes that circumstances may occur that affect the operation of the University during an academic session and may have an impact on the ability of students to complete their academic requirements in that session.

 

The goals of this policy are to ensure the academic integrity of our programs, to ensure the fair and equitable treatment of students and to provide timely information to faculty, staff and students.  The University will make reasonable effort to provide high quality education under the circumstances.

26.1 Definitions

A Disruption is considered to have occured when academic activities are substantially interrupted or impeded as a result of strikes, lockouts, demonstrations, natural disasters, or other like causes.  The University administration bears the responsibility for determining whether a disruption has occured, and its extent.

In determining whether an interruption or an impediment is substantial, the following factors shall be considered:

-the duration and point in the term or session in which the interruption occurred;
-the availability of physical and instructional resources;
-the impact on the attendance of students, instructors, and other necessary participants;
-the impact of timing and sequence of evaluations such as examinations, practica, assignments and presentations etc.;
-the degree to which the interruption is localized in physical space or limited to one or more departments or Faculties;
-the scope of the impact on the academic program as a whole


26.2 Providing Timely Information to Students

Changes to regularly scheduled academic activities and alterations to any course as outlined in the syllabus will be communicated in a timely manner to students, the respective students’ unions and other affected parties.

 

The University shall strive to inform all internal University stakeholders about ongoing developments with regard to a disruption where legally able, through a variety of media.

 

26.3 Protecting Students From Academic Penalty

Students who choose to not cross a legal picket line during a disruption shall not be penalized.  Students are not absolved of the responsibility for completing their course requirements subject to the provisions of Sections 2.6.4 and 2.6.5.

 

26.4 Disruptions of Five or Fewer Working Days

Disruptions of academic activities of five or fewer working days will be governed by normal academic regulations approved by the Senate. Individual instructors are best able to determine what remedial action is required within the academic regulations to maintain the academic integrity of each course.  Any remedial action shall include reasonable allowances for students who excercise their rights in accordance with 26.3.  Reasonable allowances could include, but are not limited to, extension of deadlines, rescheduling make-up tests, modifying or deleting assignments, alternative access to course materials, and/or other special arrangements as appropriate for disruptions of up to five working days duration.

 

26.5 Disruptions of More than Five Working Days

Disruptions of academic activities of more than five working days’ duration shall be presumed to require modification to the teaching term and/or examination schedule. Immediately following the end of a disruption of academic activities of more than five working days, the Senate Governance Committee shall hold a special meeting to discuss the recommendations of the Provost and Vice President, Academic regarding remedial action for the maintenance of the academic programs of the University, including any extension to the academic term. Any remedial action shall include reasonable allowances for students who exercise their rights in accordance with 26.3.  A special meeting of Senate shall then be convened, on the same day as the Governance Committee meets, to consider the recommendation of the Governance Committee. The five-day rule (FHB II: 7.1.3) will be automatically waived to ensure that Senate can consider any recommendations presented by the Governance Committee in a timely manner.

 

26.6 Extension of Course Withdrawal Deadline

In recognition that the quality of the learning experience received by students may suffer during a disruption, and in recognition that such a disruption may cause undue hardship upon students, academic deadlines for withdrawal from courses shall be appropriately adjusted following the conclusion of a disruption and appropriate recommendations concerning financial deadlines shall be made to the Board.

 

 

Senate 616

 

26.7 Student Appeals

The Senate Student Appeals Board, acknowledging that a disruption presents a unique set of circumstances, shall determine how to accommodate students who present an appeal.

 

26.8 Maintenance of Services

The University shall make every effort to maintain services, that are not directly impacted by the disruption for students, where reasonably possible to do so.

 Senate 588, 605