Department Research Groups

Department of Communication, Popular Culture and Film

Department Research Groups


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Crime Fiction Canada

Crime Fiction Canada is a collection of searchable databases related to the study of Detective Fiction in English in a variety of media – print, film, and television. Owned and maintained by CPCF and Interdisciplinary MA in Popular Culture faculty members Jeannette Sloniowski and Marilyn Rose, the databases cover primary and secondary sources, as well as the Skene-Melvin Collection of Crime, Mystery, and Detective Fiction, which is housed in the James A. Gibson Library at Brock.

Learn more or search the databases here.

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Transmedia Research Network

The Transmedia Research Network (TRN) formed in May 2011 to explore emerging forms of transmedia texts and practices. The network is made up of a group of scholars from CPCF and the Interdisciplinary MA in Popular Culture who employ multiple disciplinary perspectives on contemporary media transformations. TRN defines transmedia as the circulation of media formats across multiple platforms, where producers and consumers of media content interact in a relationship that creates a larger and more complex whole. 

In 2012-2013, the network hosted a Speakers Series, which featured Greg de Peuter, Lina Srivastava, and the CBC's Nora Young.

Learn more about the TRN's ongoing work here.

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Popular Culture Niagara

In 2001, eight Brock University faculty members formed an interdisciplinary research group called Popular Culture Niagara (PCN).The goal was to document historical, contemporary and culturally neglected aspects of local popular culture in Niagara, and to ensure that important local documents and artifacts were preserved for regional heritage and tourism. The group had three broad focal areas of research: Memories and Heritage; Sounds and Scenes; and Movies and Theatres. With Barry Grant acting as director, the group applied for (and received, in 2003) a Social Sciences and Humanities Council of Canada (SSHRCC) grant, with special attention to the interdisciplinary engagement of the projects and to employing graduate students in the Interdisciplinary MA in Popular Culture as research assistants.

PCN members gave numerous conference papers and local presentations on Niagara’s popular culture histories. A colloquium (2002) drew wide interest in the work of the PCN group, and the Popular Culture Niagara Conference (2006) revealed a range of research being conducted on the “localisms” of popular culture by seasoned academics and graduate students. Covering Niagara: Studies in Local Popular Culture, co-edited by Barry Grant and Joan Nicks, included essays from PCN members and other scholars in the field and was published in 2010.