Humanities Context Credits

Humanities Context Credits

Canadian Studies (CANA) 1F91
Introduction to Canadian Studies
Interdisciplinary examination of critical themes in Canadian culture, history, society and citizenship from the contact period to the present drawing on artistic, political and historical texts, inquiring into the development of, and challenges to, the Canadian nation.
 
Classics (CLAS) 1P91
Greek Civilization
Literature, art, thought and political evolution of ancient Greece, based on masterworks of classical literature. Slides are used to illustrate classical history and archaeology.
 
Classics (CLAS) 1P92
Roman Civilization
Literature, art, thought and political evolution of ancient Rome, based on masterworks of classical literature. Slides are used to illustrate classical history and archaeology.
 
Classics (CLAS) 1P93
Culture and Civilization of Central Europe: From the Prehistoric to the Carolingian Period (also offered as GERM 1P93)
Cultural development of central Europe from the earliest stone and pottery cultures, the Bronze and Iron Ages, the Celts and Romans. Beliefs and practices, artistic style and architecture. Digitized images are used to illustrate the cultural evidence.
Note: given in English.
 
Classics (CLAS) 1P95
Myths of the Greek and Roman Gods
Traditional story types: nature myths, ritual myths. Diffusion of myths in the ancient world. The creation, the succession in heaven and the individual gods. Functions of myth in ancient society. Modern theories of myth.
 
Classics (CLAS) 1P97
Myths of the Heroic Age
Traditional story types: folktale, legend. Concept of a Heroic Age, centres and cycles of legend, pseudo-history. Response to Greek and Roman myths through the ages.
 
Dramatic Arts (DART) 1F93
Introduction to Drama
Fundamentals of dramatic criticism. Study of selected dramatic texts from ancient Greece to the present emphasizing genre, theatrical and literary conventions and historical context.
 
Dramatic Arts (DART) 1F95
Introduction to Drama in Education and Society
Application of core theories, methodologies and practices of Drama in Education and Applied Theatre, emphasizing interactive teaching strategies.
Co-requisite for Dramatic Arts majors: DART 1F93, 1P97 and 1P99.
Note: materials fee may be required.
Completion of this course will replace previous assigned grade and credit in DART 1F99.
 
English (ENGL) 1F91
English Literature: Tradition and Innovation
Works from the mediaeval to the contemporary period, including such authors as Chaucer, Shakespeare, Milton, Swift, Wordsworth, the Brownings, Woolf and Rushdie. Genres include tragedy, romance, epic, and the novel. 
Note: particular attention will be paid to perceptive reading and clear, effective writing.
 
English (ENGL) 1F95
Literature in English: Forms, Themes and Approaches
Fiction, poetry, drama and film drawn from the 19th century to the present. The conventions of genre and the ways writers shape their work to produce meaning. Treatment in literature of such themes as the nature of evil; history, gender and civil strife; constructions of love.
Note: particular attention will be paid to perceptive reading and clear, effective writing.
 
English (ENGL) 1F97
Literature of Trauma and Recovery
Responses to human suffering, both personal and societal, and the power of words to express and effect change in the face of powerful adversity. Narratives of and responses to illness, violence, death and mourning, war and pestilence, and genocide. Includes works drawn from fiction, poetry and drama.
Note: particular attention will be paid to perceptive reading and clear, effective writing.
 
Film Studies (FILM) 1F94
Introduction to Film Studies
Critical and historical approaches to world cinema. Close analysis of selected films in relation to their cultural contexts.
 
French (FREN) 1F90
Intermediate French
Grammar review; literary, cultural and journalistic readings; practice in reading, writing, oral expression and comprehension.
Prerequisite: one of FREN 1F01, 1P03, Ontario grade 12U French, Fran├žais, French immersion or equivalent or permission of the instructor.
 
German (GERM) 1F90
Intermediate German
Introduction of more complex grammar concepts, as well as conversational and written skills using 20th-century literary and media sources including films, recordings, and on-line resources.
Prerequisite: GERM 1F00, Ontario grade 12U German or permission of the instructor.
 
German (GERM) 1P93
Culture and Civilization of Central Europe: From the Prehistoric to 350CE
(also offered as CLAS 1P93)

Cultural development of central Europe from the earliest stone and pottery cultures, through the Bronze and Iron Ages, the Celts and Romans. Beliefs and practices, artistic style and architecture. Digitized images are used to illustrate the cultural evidence.
Note: given in English.
 
History (HIST) 1F90
Empires and Revolutions
Major empires and revolutions in global history. Introduction to the skills of source analysis.
 
History (HIST) 1F95
World History since 1914
Major political, social, economic and cultural trends of the 20th century, focussing on developments in Europe and the way they have affected the rest of the world; the decline of Europe in global political and economic terms. Topics include the world wars, the Russian Revolution, fascism, the Holocaust, the Cold War, decolonization and conflict and its resolution in the international, political and social spheres.
 
History (HIST) 1F96
The Americas
Comparative themes in the history of the Americas from pre-Columbian times to the present, emphasizing class, colonialism, economics, gender, labour, political systems, race, religion, revolution and war.
 
History (HIST) 1P98
Western European Society and Politics to 1800
Social and political themes in the history of Western Europe before 1800.
 
History (HIST) 1P99
Western European Ideas and Worldviews to 1800
Turning points in European intellectual and cultural life from the Middle Ages through the Age of Revolutions. Topics include major intellectual trends such as the Renaissance, the Reformation, the Scientific Revolution, the Enlightenment and Romanticism.
 
Interactive Arts & Sciences (IASC) 1Q98
Introduction to Visual Culture
(also offered as LART 1Q98 and VISA 1Q98)

Concepts of art, its vocabulary, structure and varied cultural contexts. Problems of meaning, visual perception and formal structure of the visual arts, functions of art in contemporary society, the function of galleries and museums, and the role of patrons and critics. Contemporary critical methodology.
Completion of this course will replace previous assigned grade and credit obtained in VISA (GBLS) 1F98.
 
Interactive Arts and Science (IASC) 1Q99
Introduction to the History of Western Art
(also offered as LART 1Q99 and VISA 1Q99)

Analysis of key monuments and the prerequisite technology, as well as various ways of looking at the visual past and present. Focus on the visual arts from prehistory through the early 20th century.
Note: no studio work. Materials fee required. Students must take VISA 1Q98 and 1Q99 to replace previous earned credit in VISA 1F98.
Completion of this course will replace previous assigned grade and credit obtained in VISA (GBLS) 1F98.
 
Spanish (SPAN) 1P95
Conquest and Colonization
(also offered as INTC1P95)

Creation of a new culture founded on Amerindian, Iberian and African traditions; visual arts, architecture, literature and music; disparity between cultural identity and economic and political identity, utopian ideals, alienation through imitation, rediscovery of autochthonous cultural models.
Note: given in English.
 
Intercultural Studies (INTC) 1F90
Foundations of Intercultural Studies
Today's world as understood from different cultural perspectives. Cultural similarities and differences, intercultural contact and communication, and preparation for international experience. Cultural themes in imaginative, historical and expository texts.
Completion of this course will replace previous assigned grade and credit obtained in INTL 1F90 or 1P80
 
Intercultural Studies  (INTC) 1P95
Conquest and Colonization
(also offered as IBLA 1P95)

Creation of a new culture founded on Amerindian, Iberian and African traditions; visual arts, architecture, literature and music; disparity between cultural identity and economic and political identity, utopian ideals, alienation through imitation, rediscovery of autochthonous cultural models.
Note: given in English.
 
Italian (ITAL) 1F90
Intermediate Italian
Review of basic grammar; composition and oral practice. Discussions based on cultural topics, cities and the art of Italy.
Prerequisite: one of ITAL 1F00, 1F01, two or more years of high school Italian or permission of the instructor.
 
Italian (ITAL) 1P95
Italian Culture and Civilization
Artistic heritage of Italy and the intellectual, political and social forces that have shaped the mentality and way of life of the Italians. Selected texts and multi-media material.
Note: given in English.
 
Liberal Arts  (LART) 1F90
 

Poets, Painters and Philosophers

Literature, art and philosophy from creative cities (e.g., classical Athens, Renaissance Florence, modern Paris) during periods of cultural and intellectual transformation from the ancient world to the present.

 
Liberal Arts  (LART) 1Q98
Introduction to Visual Culture
(also offered as IASC 1Q98 and VISA 1Q98)

Concepts of art, its vocabulary, structure and varied cultural contexts. Problems of meaning, visual perception and formal structure of the visual arts, functions of art in contemporary society, the function of galleries and museums, and the role of patrons and critics. Contemporary critical methodology.
Note: no studio work. Materials fee required.
Completion of this course will replace previous assigned grade and credit obtained in GBLS  1Q98.
 
Liberal Arts (LART) 1Q99
Introduction to the History of Western Art
(also offered as IASC 1Q99 and VISA 1Q99)

Analysis of key monuments and on the prerequisite technology, as well as on various ways of looking at the visual past and present. Focus on the visual arts from prehistory through the early 20th century.
Note: no studio work. Materials fee required.
Completion of this course will replace previous assigned grade and credit obtained in GBLS 1Q99
 
Linguistics (LING) 1F25
The Study of Language
Readings and discussion regarding language study past and present, including the study of language and its relation to thought. Form, meaning, and use of language as examined variously from one time and place to another. Role of language study in the discussion of a range of social phenomena and issues.
Note: major credit will not be granted to Department of Applied Linguistics majors.
 
Medieval and Renaissance Studies (MARS) 1F90
Medieval and Renaissance Civilizations
Key themes, problems and topics in Medieval and Renaissance civilizations, including: the development of concepts of the Middle Ages and the Renaissance; notions of decline, renewal, rebirth and reformation in the West; sources and methods of inquiry.
 
Music (MUSI) 1F10
Introduction to Classical Music
Concepts and terminology of Western classical art music from the 17th through 20th centuries.  Development of critical listening and writing skills.
Note: major credit will not be granted to Music majors. Concert fee. Attendance at designated concerts is required.
 
Music (MUSI) 1F50
History of Music from Medieval to Modern Times
Survey of styles in Western art music; analysis of representative musical compositions with assigned readings from secondary literature.
Restriction: permission of the instructor.
Note: a level of musical literacy equivalent to Royal Conservatory Grade II rudiments is required.
 
Philosophy (PHIL) 1F90
Introduction to Philosophy: Philosophical Classics and Contemporary Life
Contemporary problems viewed through a variety of philosophical writings. Students are encouraged to formulate and examine their own beliefs about freedom, knowledge, religion, love and questions of right and wrong.
Completion of this course will replace previous assigned grade and credit obtained in PHIL 1F91, 1F93 and 1F94 except with permission of the department.
 
Philosophy (PHIL) 1F91
Human Nature
How do we see ourselves- Who are we- What are we- A critical analysis and evaluation of classical and contemporary views of human nature from a variety of philosophical and religious traditions.
Completion of this course will replace previous assigned grade and credit obtained in PHIL 1F90, 1F93 and 1F94 except with permission of the department.
 
Philosophy (PHIL) 1F93
The Foundations of the Present
An attempt to place the philosophical issues which confront the reflective individual today in their historical context by examining the teachings and arguments which shape our views of such matters as body and soul, life after death, truth and knowledge, faith and moral responsibility.
Completion of this course will replace previous assigned grade and credit obtained in PHIL 1F90, 1F91 and 1F94 except with permission of the department.
 
Philosophy (PHIL) 1F94
Problems
Central problems of philosophy as living questions for reflection, dialogue and debate, including: Is the external world really there- Does God exist- Can I really know anything- What is a person- Is everything permissible- Can my life have meaning-
Completion of this course will replace previous assigned grade and credit obtained in PHIL 1F90, 1F91 and 1F93 except with permission of the department.
 
Studies in Comparative Literatures and Cultures (SCLC) 1F90
Cultures of Western Europe

Emergence of distinct Western European cultures and civilizations from the early modern period to modern times; cultural, political and religious perspectives.
 
Spanish (SPAN) 1F90
Intermediate Spanish
Composition and oral practice. Review of Spanish grammar. Introduction to Spanish literature, Latin American and Peninsular culture and topics of current interest.
Prerequisite: one Spanish credit, two or more years of high school Spanish or permission of the Department.
Note: students with advanced standing or near native ability must take SPAN 1F91.

Visual Arts (VISA) 1Q98
Introduction to Visual Culture
(also offered as LART 1Q98 and IASC 1Q98)

Concepts of art, its vocabulary, structure and varied cultural contexts. Problems of meaning, visual perception and formal structure of the visual arts, functions of art in contemporary society, the function of galleries and museums, and the role of patrons and critics. Contemporary critical methodology.
Note: no studio work. Materials fee required. Students must take VISA 1Q98 and 1Q99 to replace previous earned credit in VISA 1F98.
Completion of this course will replace previous assigned grade and credit obtained in VISA (GBLS) 1F98.
 
Visual Arts (VISA) 1Q99
Introduction to the History of Western Art
(also offered as LART1Q99 and IASC 1Q99)

Analysis of key monuments and on the prerequisite technology, as well as on various ways of looking at the visual past and present. Focus on the visual arts from prehistory through the early 20th century.
Note: no studio work. Materials fee required. Students must take VISA 1Q98 and 1Q99 to replace previous earned credit in VISA 1F98.
Completion of this course will replace previous assigned grade and credit obtained in VISA (GBLS) 1F98.