Joanne Crawford receives the “Novice Researcher Grant” from the Canadian Association of Nurses in Oncology

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Joanne Crawford receives the “Novice Researcher Grant” from the Canadian Association of Nurses in Oncology

Published on November 12 2012


Every year one ‘novice’ oncology nurse researcher in Canada is awarded with the Novice Researcher Grant from the Canadian Association of Nurses in Oncology.

Joanne Crawford is a lecturer in the department of nursing, she was awarded the Novice Researcher Grant to help fund her doctoral research examining colorectal cancer screening behaviours in South Asian immigrants.

“It is important to understand how we can promote cancer prevention through screening given that colorectal cancer not only can be detected early but is also a preventable disease” says Crawford, who for the past 9 years has been immersed in promoting cancer screening for immigrant populations.

According to Crawford, South Asian immigrants are the largest, fastest growing ethno-cultural population in Ontario and Canada.

Among the top access barriers to cancer screening for this population is English language proficiency. Some sub-groups of South Asian immigrants report language barriers as a reason for not knowing about cancer screening and prefer to communicate using their own language.

“Messaging from awareness campaigns and promotion of the new ColonCancerCheck program in Ontario is not always accessible to ethno-cultural populations, resulting in the need for tailored community based strategies.” says Crawford.

Her doctoral research is an exploratory mixed methods research study consisting of an initial scoping literature review, and three phases: the initial data collection through cross-cultural focus groups, the development of an instrument for quantitative review, and the final stage to ‘pre-test’ the instrument on a cross-section of the population.

The Novice Researcher Award will be essential to support remuneration for South Asian research assistants who are multilingual in Punjabi, Urdu, and Hindi.

Transcription, translation, and back translation for focus groups and cross-cultural adaptation of the instrument are resource intense activities that need to be rigorous and thus, require additional resources.

The Novice Researcher grant will supplement an Ontario Population Health doctoral award received from the Population Health Improvement Research Network (PHIRN) in March 2012.

The next stage of research has begun with recruitment for focus groups in key communities across Hamilton.

For more information or to get involved with this research, please contact jcrawford@brocku.ca

 

Joanne Crawford
Joanne Crawford

Lecturer
Department of Nursing
Recipient of Novice Researcher Grant from the Canadian Association of Nurses in Oncology