Café I Panel bios

Faculty of Graduate Studies

Café I Panel bios


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Kate Zavitz was in the first SJES cohort and graduated in 2004. Kate then attended Osgoode Hall Law School, graduating in 2007 with the highlight being her time at the Parkdale Community Legal Services in the Workers’ Rights division. She articled and practised for three years at a small law firm working in union-side labour law, employment law, and professional regulatory law. She left private practice to work as a staff lawyer at a legal aid clinic for low-income injured workers. After that she moved on to the City of Toronto Office of the Ombudsman, where she has worked as an investigator for the past three years. Kate’s SJES thesis was titled “International Volunteers at a Costa Rican Organic Farm: Sheepish Volunteers, Proud Tourists and Unwitting Developers.”

 

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Allison Burgess is the Sexual & Gender Diversity Officer within the Human Resources & Equity portfolio at the University of Toronto. She holds a PhD in Sociology & Equity Studies in Education and the Graduate Collaborative Program in Women & Gender Studies from the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education of the University of Toronto (OISE/UT). Her PhD dissertation examined queer histories, activisms and organizing in Toronto. Allison’s thesis for her MA in Social Justice & Equity Studies examined the implementation and impact of a campus Positive Space Campaign. Allison’s SJES thesis was titled “Disrupting Heterosexual Space? The Implementation of a Campus Positive Space Campaign.”

 

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Lysanne Louter is a bilingual Toronto journalist with 10 years experience working in television, radio and print. She is currently working as a producer/director for CBC’s the fifth estate. Previously, she produced current affairs and news coverage for CBC’s The National. She has produced breaking news and documentaries in countries around the world including China, Burma and the Philippines. Her recent report “Made in Bangladesh” exposed the Canadian connection to the Rana-Plaza garment factory collapse. Lysanne’s work has also appeared on Radio-Canada’s investigative program Enquête, The Toronto Star, the Calgary Herald, and the Montreal Gazette. She has a bachelor’s degree in Journalism from Ryerson University. Lysanne’s SJES major research paper was titled “Free Speech and Reporting on Rights: Canadian Newspaper Treatment of Bill C-250.”

 

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Cheryl Athersych works as the Project Coordinator for the Ontario office of the Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives, an independent, non-partisan research institute concerned with issues of social, economic and environmental justice. As project coordinator, Cheryl acts as the first point of contact for public, volunteer and membership/donor inquires; coordinates CCPA Ontario public events, workshops, meetings, strategic discussions and research groups; assists with grant applications; manages databases; fundraises; manages the budget; edits work and oversees paid interns. She has an undergraduate degree in Linguistics and Sociology and has completed the coursework for her PhD in Sociology at York University. Cheryl’s SJES thesis was titled “Women’s Social Networks in Niagara: The Experience of Homelessness and Poverty.”

 

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Terry Trowbridge is now a first year PhD student in Socio-Legal Studies at York University. Since 2007, he has learned about grant writing, program design, and research on the margins of St. Catharines, Ontario, from a dynamic team of advocates for local street-level substance addicted sex trade workers. He has had ecofeminist literary criticism published in Rampike and Ariel, and co-authored essays about poetry and cryptography in Rampike and conference proceedings of the IEEE and AMC. His poems will appear in upcoming issues of The Great Lakes Review, The Dorchester Review, and The Canadian Journal of Family and Youth. Terry’s SJES thesis was titled “The Clemente Course in the Humanities and Critical Pedagogy: A Comparative Analysis of Earl Shorris and bell hooks on Poverty, Racism, Imperialism and Patriarchy.”