Historical Map Prints for Sale! Walk-in Sales only

James A. Gibson Library

Historical Map Prints for Sale! Walk-in Sales only


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St.Catharines in 1934

This poster was created by scanning original 1934 air photos and merging them together to create a mosaic view of historic St.Catharines. The poster measures 20 x 20 inches. Cost: $25.

View enlargement here.

Please phone ahead to order a printed copy. 905.688.5550 x.5890

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Third & Fourth Welland Canals - 1934

This poster was created by scanning original 1934 air photos and merging them together to create a mosaic view of the historic canals. The poster measures 28 x 17 inches. Cost: $25.

View enlargement here.

View zoomable image here.

Please phone ahead to order a printed copy. 905.688.5550 x.5890

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Samuel de Champlain, 1632

Samuel de Champlain's final map stands out among the early maps of Canada as a magnificent compilation of geographic information about New France as it was known in 1629, the year the French were expelled from the St. Lawrence River Valley by British Privateers.

View enlargement here.

$7 each

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Partie Orientale de la Nouvelle France ou du Canada

Tobias Conrad Lotter, 1762
This map is typical of the German school of thought towards map making with its ornate artwork and engraving. 

View enlargement here.

$7 each

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[The Famous Beaver Map]

 A New and Exact Map of the Dominions of the King of Great Britain on ye Continent of North America

Herman Moll, 1715, revised 1732 or later.
This map, aptly called the "Beaver Map" popularized Canada's national emblem with the 'View of ye Industry of ye Beavers of Canada in making Dams'.

View enlargement here.

$7 each

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Partie de la Nouvelle France

Alexis-Hubert Jaillot, Paris, 1685
An attractive map by the first French Cartographer to add decorative touches to scientific presentation.

View enlargement here.

$7 each

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Map shewing Mounted Police Stations & Patrols throughout the North-West Territories during the year 1886

J. Johnston, Chief Draftman, Department of the Interior
This map shows the territory of what is now Southern Saskatchewan and Alberta at a time when those provinces were still only districts.
The North-West Rebellion of 1885 had just taken place.  Shown here are the stations on the patrol routes (white lines) of the North West Mounted Police (now Royal Canadian Mounted Police), the railway, telegraph lines (both constructed and planned), towns and settlements, and Indian reserves.

View enlargement here.

$7 each

 

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Bishop's North-West War Map

George Bishop Eng & Ptg. Co., Montreal 1885
The map was produced during the North West Rebellion.  Images were copied from government publications and the map was originally published by the Canadian Pacific Railway.

View enlargement here.

$7 each

 

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Plan of the present state of the fort erecting at Point Mississauga, at the entrance of the Ni[a]gara River

George Williams, 29 July 1814
Fort Mississauga was begun in the spring of 1814 as part of the increased defences at Niagara, although it was never more than an incomplete field work during the war.  Its central tower was partially constructed from the brick remains of Niagara town buildings burned by the retreating Americans in December 1813.

View enlargement here.

$7 each

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Plan of the Fort at Point Henry in its present state. May 1814

Copied by George Williams, 24 June 1814.
Overlooking the harbour and naval yard, Fort Henry was part of the expanded defence works built at Kingston during the War of 1812.  Constructed of timber and earth faced with stone, the fort was demolished in 1832 to make way for the large stone citadel that stands today.

View enlargement here.

$7 each

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Sketch of Fort Niagara, in its present state. July 6th 1814

George Williams, 27 July 1814
One of the British forts relinquished to the United States in 1796, Fort Niagara was captured by British and Canadian forces in December 1813.  Fort Niagara, with minor improvements, was retained for the balance of the war.  With the signing of the Treaty of Ghent, the fort again reverted to the United States.

View enlargement here.

$7 each

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Plan of the present state of Fort George. June 20th, 1814.

J.B. Duberger, 9 August 1814
Initially constructed in 1796 to replace Fort Niagara, Fort George was largely destroyed during operations in 1813.  In 1814 efforts were undertaken to reconstruct the fortifications; nevertheless, the site was of diminishing importance and was finally abandoned in 1828.

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$7 each

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Plan and Sections of the Works of Defence propsed to be constructed at Amherstburg, Upper Canada

Gother Mann, 21 January 1799
The headquarters of the British Right Division during the War of 1812, Fort Amherstburg was little changed from this earlier plan.  Destroyed by the retreating British and Canadian forces in September 1813, the site was then occupied by an American force until July 1815.  Fort Malden was constructed on the ruins of the first fort.

View enlargement here.

$7 each

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Map of the Counties of Wentworth, part of Brant, and Lincoln, Haldimand, Welland

Drawn & Engraved by Ellis & Co, Toronto
The map shows the survey grid, canals, roads and road allowances, and railways:  the Buffalo to Brantford (1856), Chippawa to Niagara (1854), GWR to Niagara Falls and to Hamilton and west; and the suspension bridges at Queenston and at Niagara Falls are shown. 
It was probably prepared after 1856 and before 1859 when the Welland Railway was completed and while Ellis was at the address listed.

View enlargement here.

$7 each

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Plan de la Cataracte de Niagara et de l'Isthme qui separe les lacs Erie et Ontario

Engraving by P.F. Tardieu, Place de l'Estrapade No. 18
In M.G.S. de Crevecoeur, Voyage dans la haute Pensylvanie (Paris: Mardadon 1801).  It shows places including: Newark (Niagara-on-the-Lake), Queenstown (Queenston), Fort Chippeway, and Fort Erie as well as roads, relief and settlements.

View enlargement here.

$7 each